Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Voyager

"Flesh and Blood"

***1/2

Part I: Air date: 11/29/2000
Teleplay by Bryan Fuller
Story by Jack Monaco and Bryan Fuller & Raf Green
Directed by Mike Vejar

Part II: Air date: 11/29/2000
Teleplay by Raf Green & Kenneth Biller
Story by Bryan Fuller & Raf Green
Directed by David Livingston

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"It may be the warriors who get the glory, but it's the engineers who build societies." — Torres

In brief: Ambitious and interesting, with well-realized characters and ideas.

It's probably the end of the road for anything relating to the holodeck or holograms; with "Flesh and Blood," the Voyager writers have taken the concept as far as it can go. They've done it here with an abundance of compelling arguments and smart ideas, which is more than enough for me to set aside qualms with cans of worms opened by exploring these issues.

I complained — quite loudly, in fact — about last season's dreadful "Spirit Folk" and to a lesser extent "Fair Haven." Both of those episodes were stupid holodeck farces that didn't have the brains to overcome the problems of their implausibility. But with "Flesh and Blood," the fate of holograms and their rights as possible lifeforms is a big chunk of the point. There's some genuine depth here. It's miles ahead of a silly example of the holodeck running awry. It's also miles ahead of fourth season's "The Killing Game," to which this two-parter serves as a sequel. "The Killing Game" was an action show with no brains, whereas "Flesh and Blood" is an action show with interesting issues and debate.

Like "Killing Game," this outing involves the Hirogen. It builds upon the previous episode's end solution, where Janeway negotiated a truce by offering the Hirogen holodeck technology so they could simulate their hunts as an alternative to hunting sentient beings.

Yeah, yeah — I have to ask what the Hirogen are even doing way out here. It makes somewhere between very little and zero sense that Voyager could run into Hirogen who were affected by Voyager's actions three years ago. I suppose they've been steadily moving toward the Alpha Quadrant too, in leaps and bounds, in order to thank Starfleet for giving them the holo-technology. Uh-huh.

Never mind. That's the underlying continuity/believability-breaker, but it's fairly minor and not worth dwelling on. (Given how flexible Voyager's position in the Delta Quadrant has been in the past, if the writers are going to break this rule again, they might as well do it for a worthwhile story, which this turns out to be.)

A distress signal brings Voyager to a Hirogen training facility where something has gone very wrong. The facility is a big holodeck, and it turns out that the holograms here took control of their environment and slaughtered all the Hirogen hunters on board. They then transferred their programs to a vessel equipped with hologram emitters and escaped. The only survivor the Voyager crew finds on the facility is a young Hirogen engineer named Donik (Ryan Bollman), a non-hunter who had the sense (or cowardice, depending on your walk of life) to hide.

How did this massacre happen? The Hirogen at first claim the technology went spontaneously berserk, but it turns out they're lying; Donik's job as a hologram engineer was to modify the holograms so they could learn and adapt. These aren't your average holograms; they're special holograms on a level as advanced as the Doctor — thinking, learning, sentient AI.

Janeway agrees to help the Hirogen hunt down the renegade holograms and deactivate them. Forming an uneasy alliance (featuring the expected dosage of tension between Janeway and the Hirogen leaders), they undertake a mission that Janeway feels obligated to carry out; she gave the Hirogen this technology three years ago, and she doesn't want it becoming a roaming threat. The Hirogen, of course, see this mission as another hunt.

The story gets much more complicated when the holograms abduct the Doctor, transferring his program to their vessel. They are led by a man named Iden (Jeff Yagher), a hologram with Bajoran form. Iden tells Doc that the holograms are fighting for their own freedom and survival; the Hirogen use them simply as programmed prey, but, like Doc, they have the ability to evolve beyond their programming. Iden sees himself as a liberator; after he freed himself and obtained a ship, he liberated holograms from three Hirogen facilities, and intends to free more of "his people."

The beauty of the episode is its plentiful complexity. It's not simply about hunting the holograms, and it's not simply about the possibility that hunting down these holograms is wrong. It's about the dialog and situations that arise in the meantime, prompting us to ponder both sides of the issue. Who are these holograms, and have they earned the status of having rights? At what point does technology attain rights, exactly? Would reprogramming the technology to regress it into something more rudimentary be tantamount to a forced lobotomy? And would deactivating such technology be the same as imprisonment or a death sentence?

With its two-hour length, "Flesh and Blood" has plenty of time to dive into a lot of well-written discussions, in addition to the action that moves the story forward. Many of these discussions are between Iden and Doc and reveal different points of view, both of which have merit when considering the characters' origins. Iden thinks of Doc as a slave who serves "organics." Doc doesn't see it that way, since he has been afforded the opportunities to pursue interests that push beyond the boundaries of his original function. But Iden's prejudices against organics are certainly understandable. He was programmed to be hunted and killed over and over again by Hirogen hunters. His purpose was essentially one to be tortured (the Hirogen, thorough in their desire to create credible prey, programmed these holograms with the capacity to feel pain and suffering).

There's a nightmarish sequence where Doc suddenly finds himself being hunted by a sadistic Hirogen. This turns out to be an implanted memory from one of Iden's own people. There's perhaps nothing quite like living through the plight of someone else to possibly understand where they're coming from (cf. last season's "Memorial").

There's an abundance of plotting in the story's two hours, including several ship chases, a few clever tactical maneuvers, Hirogen ships firing on the holograms and on Voyager (and vice-versa), a technical procedure contrived by Torres as a temporary measure to try to shut down all the holograms' programs, and a trek through a nebula. Between directors Mike Vejar (part one) and David Livingston (part two) and all the writers involved in scripting the two teleplays, "Flesh and Blood" is well constructed and well paced. A lot happens, but we're never lost, and the story keeps a firm grasp on all the details to make it something that makes sense and also remains entertaining.

As a sign of trust, Iden agrees to negotiate, transporting Doc back to Voyager, where he pleads with Janeway to consider the holograms' position. Intriguing is how Janeway's position on the matter doesn't depict her as the episode's hero; she's more of an antagonist if we were to assume Doc as the story's hero. She won't put others in the potentially dangerous path of these holograms, even if means deactivating them. Really, there aren't clear-cut heroes anywhere here, which is to the story's credit. Instead, there are viewpoints. Janeway's position at least partially stems from the guilt of having uncorked these holograms by sharing the holo-technology in the first place. Doc is so immersed in the plight of others of his "kind" that he flees Voyager and willingly returns to assist the holograms.

All of this is well documented by the plot, but what makes this story stand out are the details in the characterization, particularly once Torres is beamed to the holograms' vessel to help them build a generator that will allow them to live on an isolated world. (Iden says his mission isn't one of continued violence, but finding a place where his people can live peacefully without being hunted by the Hirogen.)

Even the choices for the holograms' forms proves interesting. Iden's Bajoran identity is appropriate given DS9's milieu of Bajoran freedom fighters trying to end oppression, and Iden even comes preprogrammed with spiritual beliefs. There's also a Cardassian hologram character here, named Kejal (Cindy Katz). Her name is of Bajoran origin, given to her by Iden, which translates as "Freedom."

The Doc/Iden scenes are good, but equally impressive are the more subtle discussions between Torres and Kejal. Torres isn't sure if helping these holograms is a good idea, since the technology she's rigging could be abused for hostile purposes. I appreciated the added dynamic of Torres' discomfort with Cardassians, held over from her old Maquis days. There's a nifty little nod to stereotypes of Klingons and Cardassians, and an even niftier point where Kejal draws a parallel between Torres joining the Maquis to fight Cardassian oppressors and the holograms' current uprising against the Hirogen. (I'm tempted to wonder how much irrelevant Alpha Quadrant information these holograms would've been provided by the Hirogen, but why quibble.)

The story's latter passages involve a turning point where Iden evolves from what appears a sincere freedom fighter into a megalomaniac who sees himself as a messiah to save all enslaved holograms. This turning point is probably a bit extreme and sudden, but still reasonably portrayed. There's a well-depicted example of pointless violence where Iden steals some holograms from a passing merchant vessel, and then destroys the ship and its two "organic" pilots. The holograms he stole turn out to be non-sentient drones capable of only a few rudimentary functions. They do not have the ability to grow the way Iden and his crew do.

Which is interesting, because one of the implicit ideas here is the contrasting level of growth between Iden and Kejal. Iden's megalomania stems from his hatred of the Hirogen and the violent tendencies they programmed him with — tendencies he ultimately is not able to overcome. He constantly goes back to his nature of fighting any organics who stand in the way of his holographic society.

Kejal, on the other hand, is able to grow beyond her original violent directives. (Earlier, Torres tells Kejal, with a tone that hints of personal experience, "It's not easy to change who you are. Trust me.") The notion of preprogrammed instincts and one's ability to grow beyond them (or not) hints at the "nature vs. environment" debate, something I'll mention but won't elaborate on (since I can't go on forever). What permitted Kejal, but not Iden, to evolve beyond her inherent violence? Was it fate? The difference in their overall purpose and experiences? These are typically human questions, aptly applied here to artificial intelligence.

The end of the story involves a massacre scenario where Iden beams a ship full of Hirogen to the surface of a harsh planet, and intends to wreak vengeance upon his oppressors by turning the hunters into the hunted. It's a decent idea, ultimately forcing Doc to kill Iden to end the cycle of violence, but it's not all that original and doesn't quite live up to the subtler arguments earlier in the episode. It's executed at a breakneck pace, cramming what could've played as a long action scene into a surprisingly short amount of time — but it somehow remains coherent.

The performances and guest performances are on target. Jeff Yagher brings urgency and sincerity to Iden; Cindy Katz portrays a calm and confident Cardassian; and Ryan Bollman is good as the scared young Hirogen engineer who shows that at least one Hirogen character doesn't have to growl every time he has a line.

"Flesh and Blood" is a well-crafted Voyager outing. As an "epic two-hour telefilm!" it's by far the best of the series' three (excluding the pilot), the other two being the dumb and bloated "Killing Game" and the entertaining but relatively thin "Dark Frontier." As a holodeck show, it puts most others to shame by thinking about the issues it raises instead of bulldozing through them in favor of idiotic farce ("Spirit Folk") or sidestepping necessary questions of programming capability ("Nothing Human"). It's an adventure that uses characters and ideas wisely, and the best outing so far this season.

Upcoming: Reruns. See you in 2001.

Previous episode: Nightingale
Next episode: Shattered

Season Index

54 comments on this review

Immanuel - Sat, Sep 15, 2007 - 2:17pm (USA Central)
The Hirogen were always portrayed as a nomadic species. So it isn't hard for me to believe that they spread themselves throughout the quadrant. And assuming different hunting parties sometimes communicate with each other, all they'd have to do is transmit the specs. of the holodeck technology...gradually "passing along" the information in this manner. Just a theory.

I agree with your 3.5 star rating here. This episode also features one of the favorite Voyager teasers. :-)
indijo - Sat, May 24, 2008 - 5:18pm (USA Central)
Considering all they know and have experienced about the Hirogen, the most unbelievable aspect of this episode is the simple fact that Janeway would go out of her way to help them, while putting Voyager and its crew at extreme risk. The Hirogen are obviously the epitome of murderous fascists in the Delta Quadrant, why be so damn nice to them?
EP - Tue, Mar 10, 2009 - 3:07am (USA Central)
I thought this was a thinly-veiled gun control allegory episode, particularly when Chakotay essentially says, "Holograms don't kill people. People kill people." They didn't take it much beyond that, though.

It was absurd that Tuvok was able to incapacitate a Hirogen with the Vulcan nerve pinch. As if every species has vulnerable nerve clusters in the same spot.

I also thought this was another one of those cautionary tale episodes, showing the consequences of Janeway mucking around in the quadrant. Of course, the plot didn't really touch on this point for any length of time. Perhaps Janeway got a rap on her knuckles when she returned to the Alpha Quadrant and filed her report (before she got promoted to Admiral, of course).

Whatever. This episode has excellent music, and provided the basis for some excellent cards for ST CCG, so I won't register any other petty complaints.
gion - Mon, May 18, 2009 - 6:32pm (USA Central)
Had a hard time taking the whole things seriously after witnessing the spectacle of holograms lying on a sickbed, the doctor asking whether they could move their limbs. This is comedy-material, not sci-fi drama.

Still, the story was otherwise thight, the drama was good and the battle sequences were very nice. It's just as shame the writers neglect the little things that would make it more believable.
David - Sat, Aug 1, 2009 - 12:03am (USA Central)
Outstanding part 1, disappointing part 2. Iden's whiplash-quick change from an idealistic freedom fighter seeking only a peaceful homeworld to a sadist with a God complex was not convincing in the least.
Zarm - Mon, Dec 7, 2009 - 10:08am (USA Central)
I don't think the Hirogen's presence here and in Tuskan... the wrestling episode... are so egregious considering that when introduced, they occupied a network that spread from the Delta to the Alpha quadrants (Message in a Bottle)- clearly theirs is a widespread society (already established as nomadic) that appears to have widely traveled along the same path that Voyager will need to take to get home. Given this, I don't think it's unreasonable that the ever-traveling Hirogen are still encountered... perhaps only implausible that the holographic technology has disseminated this far out (unless the Hirogen have another relay/communication method).
Nic - Wed, Feb 10, 2010 - 11:00am (USA Central)
I really hate Iden's blatant change in character. Up to that point you could have sympathy for all the characters involved, but as soon as he turns into a megalomaniac, it makes the Doctor's choice way too easy, and by the end of the episode, there are no grey areas left. That's really too bad because the rest of the episode had so much potential.
Michael - Sat, Jul 17, 2010 - 8:13am (USA Central)
*sigh*
[Hirogen vessel intercepts Voyager and starts firing at it. Shields @ 68%.]
Tuvok: "Shall I reutrn fire?"
Janeway: "Not yet."
[Hirogen ship fires again. Shields @ 52%.]
Janeway: "Open a channel. This is blah-blah-blah. We don't wanna fight y'all."
[Hirogen ship fires again. Shields @ 36%.]
Janeway: "Stand down or we will return fire."
[Hirogen ship fires again.]
Janeway: "Fire."

I'm surprised she didn't offer the Hirogen vessel personnel a chance to talk about their misplaced aggression and explore their relationships with their mothers before deciding to return fire!!

And what was that nonsense with one hologram propping up another that was apparently "injured," or a hologram being scanned on a sick-bed, or a hologram praying to some spirit?!? WTF!?!

Doc: "Captain, these people are on the verge of creating new lives for themselves." PEOPLE!!? They're H-O-L-O-G-R-A-M-S!!!

So, we had human rights, alien rights, android rights, animal rights... - now it's time for hologram rights. Political correctness marches on.

Overall though, a good and exciting episode though some of the ethical philosophical discourse scenes were too long. I agree with Jammer's rating. On to part 2... - watch this space! :D

P.S. Harry "Can't-Get-A-Lock" Kim was trumped again, this time by a Hirogen who locked him out of the comms system. Man, that guy is beyond caricature!!
Michael - Sat, Jul 17, 2010 - 10:22am (USA Central)
Part 2: Wow, the Hirogens are some piece of work. And I thought the Klingons were a bunch of primitive asswipes!

I loved the second part, too, even more than the first part. Sure, the hologram leader's character 180 happened improbably fast but I actually found his earlier partrayal as "purer than pure" far more unlikely than his sinister incarnation from the second part. Besides, most "freedom fighters" turn into megalomaniacs to some degree either during or after their struggle. Nelson Mandela is the only instance that comes to mind who defies that observation.

The ending was lame but, of course, in these modern times nobody is ever to be blamed for anything because values and principles are all relative and one mustn't be judgmental! I'd have reset The Doc's program to its original parameters but that's just the stick-in-the-mud old me.

LOVED the action/battle sequences. Great sound track, too!

Definitely one of my favorite Voyager shows!
Elliott - Thu, Aug 12, 2010 - 2:58am (USA Central)
It's true the God complex transition is a little sudden, but I blame that on the SHORT air-time for this series. DS9 was such a disappointing show, but I so wish Voyager had been afforded the luxury of extended story arcs as DS9 had. In these two parters and meagre sequel episodes, the writers do their best. Anyway, the seeds for the God complex are planted from the beginning with Iden's religious beliefs. I agree the choice of species is very telling about not only the episode's philosophy, but the show's as well; I LOVE that Voyager turned DS9 back on its head, just as DS9 tried to do with TNG and TOS--the Bajorans' culture (by trek standards, barbaric and backward) is afforded every doubt and excuse in the later TNG seasons and DS9, but Voyager, not bound to the befuddled Alpha Quadrant's new politics, can reëxamine those issues afresh--Iden's religions (Bajoran whole-planet wormholeism and his new "Children of Light"--why does that sound familiar?) are revealed to be a means to power, something Iden understandably craves after being a torture-pleasure slave. Words like "prejudice," "liberate," and "peace" are thrown around to garner sympathy, but it's all about power. While there's no hero in the Hollywood sense, Janeway, Kejal and the Doctor are Greek-style heroes--unable to exonerate themselves from the mistakes they have made, but courageous enough to do whatever they can do take responsibility for their actions.
navamske - Sat, Oct 16, 2010 - 7:20pm (USA Central)
At the end, Janeway declines to discipline the Doctor on the basis of the fact that he's become "as fallible as those of us who are made of flesh and blood": "How can I punish you for being who you are?" This is absurd. Maybe she feels she can't take action against him in the context of his being a hologram, but he's still a Starfleet "officer" in the sense that he's expected to follow and conform to Federation law and Starfleet protocols. I guess she can't "bust" him because he doesn't have a rank, but some sort of disciplinary action seems more than appropriate.
Jay - Sun, Mar 13, 2011 - 1:08pm (USA Central)
So a couple episodes earlier we had a humanoid race that was seemingly at war with photonic insurgents...are these it?
Tom - Tue, Apr 5, 2011 - 11:15am (USA Central)
When we first saw the Hirogen, weren't they about twice the size of the Voyager crew? Did they shrink over time?
Cloudane - Fri, Apr 8, 2011 - 3:31pm (USA Central)
More Red Dwarf copying :) (Holoship: Rimmer gets invited to escape the clutches of the biologicals and join his own kind)

Interesting episode, I would tend to agree that it gives us the more or less face-on handling of the holographic sentience issue that the series has desperately needed for some time.

I wouldn't call it a full resolution (that would require a clone of TNG's excellent "Measure of a Man" and could probably only be done in the Alpha Quadrant anyway), but I've come to accept that the Trek writers took a more philosophical approach with holograms than they did with Data. Data was pretty much unquestionably sentient from activation, whilst holograms seem to take a more gradual and grey-area approach.

When you think about it, we can't even decide when a human becomes sentient (hence the whole abortion debate, and let's not get into it) so even though I've complained about the lack of "Measure"-like certainty on the issue in the past, in hindsight it seems pretty fair really. This episode makes good use of the issues whilst still leaving it some degree of mystery. That's fine.

(I heard the hologram rights thing is brought up again late in the series so maybe I will get my original wish but at this point I'm not fussed either way)

It's fantastic to see consequences of earlier actions. In a series that has for so long prided itself in its isolated episode format, to bring one of Janeway's much earlier decisions crashing down on her is a real treat. I've missed that. More please :)

Oh and did they rearrange the ending music? Sounded a little different.. even though the differences are minor it sounded befitting a mature series in its final chapter.
Cloudane - Fri, Apr 8, 2011 - 4:21pm (USA Central)
^ Back to normal next episode. Guess it was a 2-parter credit music thing.
Kieran - Wed, May 4, 2011 - 6:04am (USA Central)
"How can I punish you for being who you are?" This line probably seemed profound to whoever wrote it, but it's just nonsense. If a guy murders someone because it's "who he is", should he escape punishment? Unless Janeway means Doc cannot be judged like a full person can be, which seems to go against the whole point of the episode.

Still, apart from the Doctor escaping all punishment and Iden's turning into a nutjob just so we can have a proper bad guy, I thought this was a pretty solid episode with quite a few interesting points raised.
Kristen - Thu, Oct 20, 2011 - 4:58pm (USA Central)
Kristen's brain in first five minutes:
"Simon Tarses is in the Delta Quadrant?!?!"

Kristen's brain about ten minutes later:
"The Hirogen based a hologram on Simon Tarses?"

Kristen's brain ten minutes after that:
"Why, he isn't acting like Simon Tarses at all!"

Kristen's brain now:
"I miss Simon Tarses. I'm gonna go watch 'The Drumhead'."
Paul York - Tue, May 1, 2012 - 11:17am (USA Central)
Hologram rights is a good thought-experiment, because they are sentient and intelligent, and in this episode, they can also suffer and experience emotions. The deeper issue, that pertains to our existence, is the rights of individuals, whether human or non-human. Any creature, whether of this world or another, whether human or not, has basic rights, and recognizing and respecting that is supposedly what Federation values are about. I love ST (all of them) but wish that for once animal rights would have been addressed directly, instead of allegorically through aliens experimenting on humans or Data or the Doctor talking about their own rights. Sentience, intelligence, and a capacity to feel and suffer are the fundamental issues ... and nonhuman animals have all those capacities. That is why Riker in TNG tells some aliens that humans no longer eat animals, and why Janeway tells an alien vivisector that humans no longer experiment on other beings. There is also the issue of the rights of those in the future, which the temporal prime directive is meant to protect -- something that our species would do well to consider vis-a-vis the use of fossil fuels causing global warming. If humanity has the values of the Federation of Planets we would cease harming animals and would build an entirely new infrastructure on Earth, with renewable energy and protection for biodiversity. That is the true work for engineers at this time in history, not twiddling on making destructive technologies more efficient.
Elliott - Tue, May 1, 2012 - 11:31am (USA Central)
@ Paul York :

I'm all for antivivisection in most instances, but most animals don't possess anything close to sentience. Maybe dolphins and chimps and apes, but that's about it.
Justin - Tue, Jun 26, 2012 - 11:29am (USA Central)
Meh. I'll take "Dark Frontier" over this any day.
Jelendra - Tue, Jul 3, 2012 - 5:08am (USA Central)
Not too bad. It was a nice action packed adventure with a lot of stuff that made me like it less than Jammer did. I get why Janeway chooses to go after the holograms though it would have been a lot easier to walk away and let the Hirogen deal with it.

Why are we still dealing with the Hirogen after all these years ?

Doc pulls a fast one that puts everyone at risk, and he isnt punished or reprogrammed ? (I wouldnt want him to be reprogrammed either, but its what makes sense here...)

David - Mon, Nov 19, 2012 - 1:58pm (USA Central)
Jem'hadaar hologram? Not sure that would work out. Holograms were created three years ago. Was that before or after the first alpha quadrant transmission?
Destructor - Mon, Dec 10, 2012 - 8:55pm (USA Central)
I thought it was pretty well established in the first episode to feature the Hirogen (Hunters) that the Hirogen hunting grounds covered a massive area that stretched to the edge of the Beta Quadrant, as dictated by a network of communication relays that they used to coordinate (and Voyager destroyed- oops)- so it's entirely reasonable that they are a nomadic, wolf-like species that covers an extremely wide territory but does not have an organized government or homeworld as such.

I noticed the Jem-Hadar thing as well, but Sisko did encounter them about three months before Voyager left the AQ, so it's likely they were added to their database of alien species in order for other officers to study. More confusing is why a hologram programmed to think it was a Borg drone would cooperate with Iden and the others.

The 'irrelevant AQ information' was probably NOT programmed by the Hirogen. They probably asked to see some AQ species for them to hunt, and the technology itself gave them the associated traits of that species, just as it would if Worf asked the holodeck to create some sparring opponents for him.
Jay - Mon, Jan 14, 2013 - 10:21am (USA Central)
@ David...

Sure there coul dbe a Jem'hadar hologram...by the time Voyager launched, it was mid-season 3 on DS9, the the Jem'Hadar/The Search I&II had happened. The Jem'hadar would be in the Starfleet database henceforth...
Arachnea - Thu, Jan 31, 2013 - 1:44pm (USA Central)
That was an excellent two-parters with subtle characterization and a good story.

That is, until the very end... I also thought the change in Iden was too abrupt, but I could live with it. What I found wrong - in an episode where there's an emphasis on consequences - that the Doctor doesn't suffer any consequences (except his own guilt).

I critisized Sisko a lot, so it's only fair to analyse Janeway too. I guess she is prejudiced against Paris. In another episode, we heard the captain tell Kim she wouldn't have been surprised if Paris had done what Kim did (which is totally wrong to tell to a co-worker).

So, Tuvok, Chakotay, Kim and now the Doc are just reprimanded while Paris is not only being demoted, he's put in the Brig (with no visitors, which is also wrong and a good way to have someone become irrational and getting psychologically disturbed) for a whole month. That means Ops, security and seconding are more valuable than the pilot ? And than the only medic ? Or that means there's an obvious double standard.

Well, I've said it, now I can move on :p. It's a shame, because the rest of this episode was great.
Jeffrey Bedard - Wed, Mar 20, 2013 - 7:52am (USA Central)
I agree with Navamske. The EMH purposefully gave Iden tactical information in order to transport to Iden's ship and make sure that Voyager's plan failed. At best, borderline mutiny. At worst, full on mutiny and treason. And in the end nothing happens to him. Perhaps one of the perks of being a hologram is that it gets you out of being punished like an organic.
Adara - Thu, May 9, 2013 - 10:47am (USA Central)
If I lived in the ST future, I'd be a freedom fighter for holographic rights too. Deliver these children of light! :P
Leah - Thu, Jul 18, 2013 - 11:50pm (USA Central)
A nice meaty episode, but I am also of the opinion that Iden's change in character was entirely too abrupt. It would have been far better if he had been somewhere in the middle but just enough to force a response, and Doc having to kill him would have been a much harder choice. Heck, I'd even accept that maybe some power surge causes the violence and aggression subroutines he was programmed with in the beginning to take over again, choking out the progress he had made toward being something more. But perhaps he'd still have moments of clarity so the breakdown is believable and gradual, which would make him more of a tragic character.

The other thing that bothered me greatly was the flip-flopping of the entire holographic group. At first, they all seemed keen on the idea of starting their own society and getting away from "organics." Only that one Starfleet-looking one showed an overt bloodthirsty nature throughout everything. But as soon as Iden goes off the deep-end, so do all of the others with the exception of only Kejal. With the capacity to grow and evolve, I would think more of them than just one would have gotten past being easily-swayed sheep.

Oh, and yes, Doc's lack of consequences was a pretty egregious issue. He IS still a member of the crew and therefore should be held accountable for his actions. Though, I can't help but wonder if letting him off the hook was Janeway's way of acknowledging her own fault over everything. As if to say, "This is as much my fault as it is anyone else's so we're just going to call this one a joint debacle and move on." Then again, she's such an inconsistently written character that I can never figure out her motivations from one situation to the next.

Last thing, I really liked the little Hirogen engineer guy. I liked seeing a Hirogen that had more interest in a cerebral career than in participating in the barbarism of the hunt, and that even though Janeway's actions of giving them the tech had caused a lot of trouble, it also had at least one positive result: the chance for this guy to become more than what he thought he was born to. An interesting parallel, and it makes sense in that respect why he'd actually identify with the holograms.
azcats - Mon, Aug 26, 2013 - 12:07pm (USA Central)
so, kim has sex with an alien and gets reprimanded and the doctor sabotages the ship by turning down the shields and he gets "to err is human?"

but fun episodes.

3.5 stars.
SpiceRak2 - Fri, Sep 13, 2013 - 7:36pm (USA Central)
I may be the only one to feel differently about the Doctor deserving "punishment" for his actions. I will admit that the Janeway/Doctor scene at the end was a disappointment, but for different reasons.

Janeway said that she, in essence, "created the monster" by letting the Doctor exceed his programming and therefore she can no more blame him than herself. That seems so arrogant to me. He made the choice to betray Voyager. BUT, I feel it was with good reason: even in that very scene, Janeway showed a lack of respect for the individual that the Doctor has become. If he were like everyone else, she would have done two things:

1) Come to terms with her continuing bias regarding the fact that the Doctor is a hologram. She should have acknowledged that he was driven to disloyalty because despite his "freedoms," he is not treated anything like another member of the crew and NEVER taken seriously. She still sees him as a tool and not a sentient being. A ship-wide communication could have been made regarding the treatment of the Doctor.

2) With this new acknowledgment, she should have disciplined the Doctor, but to a lesser degree. Perhaps, his holo emitter could have been confiscated for three months and a report put on his record.
Elliott - Fri, Sep 13, 2013 - 8:47pm (USA Central)
@SpiceRak2

I see your point about Janeway, but it's important to remember 2 things :

1) Janeway specifically mentions in "Author, Author" how Doc's insubordination changed her perception of him as a lifeform, and

2) when she first confronted Iden, Janeway may have been polite and cordial at first, but she had the "off switch" in her back pocket--a tactic which could only be employed as a result of her opponents' nature, being AI; I think Janeway accepted Doc's sentience in S5's "Latent Image", but it was accepting that he was sentient like a human(oid) is sentient, not as an intrinsic part of HIS nature as a hologram. When it came time to punish Doc, Janeway had it seems two options; punish him like a human officer (revoke his privileges, reprimand him, etc.) or punish him like a hologram (returning to that "off switch" scenario which is at the heart of the moral/philosophical issue of the episode). Choosing either would be insufficient in setting a precedent and acknowledging that a fundamental shift in perspective had occurred. In the future, Janeway would just be negligent not to punish the Doc (and indeed, in "Renaissance Man", she does), but at this point, punishing him would be too small a way of thinking, of feeling and of giving weight to the crisis which had just transpired; by not punishing him at all, Janeway is humbly admitting to her own fallibility and to a complexity which is beyond her ability to cope with given the tools at present. Understanding and accepting "new" ways of life often requires this kind of thinking, of accepting that the parameters of the "old way" are too narrow to function any longer. I thought it was a beautiful scene and by choosing the "third" option, gave the philosophical core a gravitas that any other choice would lessen.
SpiceRak2 - Sat, Sep 14, 2013 - 1:59am (USA Central)
@Elliot

Fair enough. That is interesting. The humility, or actually, I would call it reverse pride, that I perceived from Janeway seemed more a product of guilt for being open to sharing Starfleet technology in the first place and less about any new perception of the Doctor and Hologram life forms. I didn't get the impression that she saw anything more than a member of her crew making a critically and devastatingly poor decision. There didn't seem to be enough emphasis on the Doctor's motivation for that decision. One would assume that in order for the Doctor to commit to something this egregious, he would have to be pushed beyond his limit of logic and loyalty.

Case in point: as Janeway first speaks to the Doctor in that final scene, she acknowledges having a hope that there was a glitch in his programming. Of course that serves to solidify her regret for the situation, but it also seems dismissive of his feelings...dismissive of her role in driving him to this point.
DPC - Thu, Sep 26, 2013 - 8:45pm (USA Central)
"This turns out to be an implanted memory from one of Iden's own people. There's perhaps nothing quite like living through the plight of someone else to possibly understand where they're coming from (cf. last season's "Memorial")."

Very true. Recall in TOS, "The Immunity Syndrome", when Spock tells McCoy about "suffer the death of thy neighbor" and how if humans had their history would be less bloody? This VOY episode reflects on that and takes it to a personal level. The EMH loathes the instilled 'torture', but it is a thoughtful and complex episode.

And it's nice to see repercussions from Janeway bending the prime directive in ways she thinks will help her but, oops, really don't.

The EMH's fast one to give the other holograms an edge came out of nowhere, as what he did damaged a lot of equipment and hurt and almost killed many. Did the EMH learn "the hypocritical oath", perhaps?

The only thing that bugs me is that they're holograms. I usually love high concept stories, but the premise takes much disbelief to suspend. Manage to do that and it's a 5/5 story. I still can't help but to rate it 3.5 or 4, despite a very worthy and complex topic, mostly because I can't see the Doc risking others' lives as such and that using holograms is a trifle convenient. It's easier to forgive the latter than the former...

But even season 7 of VOY does have much life in it, despite these more extravagant episodes having as much to nitpick as there is much to wholly admire in attempting to say.
Jo Jo Meastro - Mon, Oct 14, 2013 - 1:00pm (USA Central)
The action and the fascinating debates and ideas are all presented close to perfection. For the first time, Voyager has done a story which can rival the daring depth and the effortless complexity of DS9 on top form.

I liked the edge this story has. The shocking treatment and the proceeding fallout of holographic beings is unflinchingly ugly. It mirrors real life where right and wrong spill together, ugliness reigns supreme and people suffer to the point it can no longer sustain anybody and the whole sorry thing dies bitterly. Okay, it doesn't go whole hog with mirroring reality; but it definitely feels more honest and gritty compared to most Voyager adventurey conflicts.

Yet he need to restore normality does taint the final resolution of the story. The conflict sacrificed much of its complexity when it needed to end and of course the Doctor had to be pardoned.

But I think these inevitable wrap-ups were done as well as they possibly could, keeping its philosophical heart intact. 3.5/4 stars.
Adam - Sat, Dec 7, 2013 - 10:04pm (USA Central)
I just watched this one. Enjoyed this episode a lot. Good morality play, good action, nice to see some familiar Alpha Quadrant faces, the Jem 'Hadar, the Breen, the Bajorans, etc. The scenes between the Doctor and Iden, B'Elanna and the Cardassian Kejal, were great. I really liked the scene between the Doctor and Janeway at the end.

Voyager had its problems, but it seemed to do the two part epics quite well most of the time. I agree with Jammer's review of this.
Nick - Tue, Feb 4, 2014 - 9:47am (USA Central)
I agree with some others here, Part I was decent and compelling, however the Plot quickly fell apart in Part II.

The most egregious part of the episode came in the final wrap up, where Janeway spent about thirty seconds contemplating the can-of-worms of releasing the holograms wrought, and to top it off, the Doc gets pardoned. A reset-button if ever there was one. No lesson learned, no moral, just another f#ck up. ;)

Starfleet will have much to answer too once they expand into the space previously journeyed by Voyager, to answer the many grievances of species affected by the cavalier technology sharing by Janeway and Co.
Chris P - Sun, Feb 9, 2014 - 12:26am (USA Central)
A Hirogen in the mess hall locked the bridge out of their own comm system, amongst too many other strange behaviors and decisions and contrivances to lazily nudge the plot forward. Great subject matter but almost nothing happens naturally in this episode and thus I had too much trouble enjoying this episode. Why do they insult their audience almost every week?

1.5 stars.

Amanda - Tue, Feb 25, 2014 - 5:14pm (USA Central)
"How can I punish you for who you are?" Really? Ask Tuvock, Chakotay, Belanna, and Paris who got a lecture for their infractions.
Ric - Thu, Jun 5, 2014 - 11:02pm (USA Central)
Just after the episode where H. Kim finds out he is far from captain material, here he breaks his own multiple incompetence records: he can't lock on a hologram being transferred outside the ship.

Also, we have to watch Janeway threatening an uncooperative alien in the sense that if he does not cooperates, she will abandon him and his men, wounded, in the next habitable planet! Preposterous.

These Voyager annoyances aside, it was quite a good episode. Sure, with problems here and there, like the overly naïve behavior of the Doc. Which is even slightly out-of-character. But with some inspired details to compensate, like the "hologram rebellion" that is quickly touched in the episode.

It is just sad that Voyager didn't deliver what such a plot promised. I just wish we had a real hologram rebellion arc to deeper debate the thin boundary that separates programmed beings from living beings.

On the other hand, the last scene was amazingly good. One of the best in a very long time. Sure, by the book the Doc deserved more punishment. Sure, being complacent can be accused by some viewers as just-another-Janeway-irresponsible decision. But under the circumstances, I do feel she did the best: let Doc live with the weight of his mistakes forever, after acknowledging that we has crossed barrier of a programmed being to one that can REALLY make his own moral decisions.

For me, that was what this episodes was (or tried to be) about. For a moral perspective, the living Doc was fully born in this episode.
Sean - Fri, Aug 1, 2014 - 3:44am (USA Central)
"It's true the God complex transition is a little sudden, but I blame that on the SHORT air-time for this series."

Elliott, please. This show was practically guaranteed seven seasons given the popularity of Trek at the time. It had plenty of time for whatever character development or plot threads it wanted. That's not an excuse you can make for this show. You have to face the fact that the writers simply weren't concerned with such things. They wanted to do episodic schlock and that's what they did. It's true that Paramount held them on a short leash, but it's equally true that Berman and Braga are bad showrunners.

As for the religion, so one person wants to use religion for his own personal gain and suddenly every Bajoran who's religious is only in it for the personal gain? That all religious people are like that? DS9 did not say that, and indeed also had a recurring character who used religion for her own personal gain: Kai Winn. She believed she was doing what was right, even if she really was motivated by power at every turn. And even if she didn't really believe she was motivated by power.
Elliott - Fri, Aug 1, 2014 - 12:15pm (USA Central)
@Sean: I actually concede that point entirely. All the Trek spinoffs could have benefited from about 1 less season in their runs (unless they were going to add something worthwhile to the mix). You see S7 as fan-trolling, which is kind of odd, I see it as them trying something new with the final season. In that context, S7 was too late for them to start this off if they weren't getting an eighth season (which they knew they weren't). It should have started at S6. Stretching this episode into three parts would have made time to show Iden's transition properly.
Sean - Fri, Aug 1, 2014 - 3:18pm (USA Central)
@Elliott: I do appreciate that they were doing something like Harry Kim finally getting some development, but it really was, as Jammer said, too little too late. This was something they should have done a long time ago in season 1 or 2. That episode only served as a reminder of how little the characters actually change.

In the same way, I do appreciate them trying something different, but too little too late can apply to most of season 7. As I'm sure you agree. They decided a long time ago that Voyager was going to be an episodic schlocky action show, and so they stuck with it. It was only in season 7 when they reversed course and decided to do some character development, it really was far too late.

Which is why I feel bad for Enterprise, because Enterprise is a copy of Voyager it was already too late for it to be good before it started.
Sean - Fri, Aug 1, 2014 - 4:04pm (USA Central)
Oh, and regarding one less season, I do really enjoy DS9's season seven. I would agree that it could have done with one less season if all of the seasons were pushed back and there were less alien of the week episodes when DS9 was trying to be TNG on a space station in seasons 1-3. That's not to say all episodes of those seasons were bad, just that the seasons after 3 tended to have very few bad episodes, usually just a ferengi episode here or there.
Elliott - Fri, Aug 1, 2014 - 4:28pm (USA Central)
I think Voyager really found its stride in S5--most of the episodes in that season were good to great and most of the characterisations were very strong. It managed to be fun, thoughtful and engaging. The next step, logically was what they tried in S7, but they waited too long and rode the fumes during S6, meaning that there wasn't really enough time when they finally did start arcing to do it properly. That's why, from a S7-perspective, the series feels shortchanged. In this way, it's a lot like Enterprise's 4th season. They were in their fourth year, but when they finally started doing the show right, there wasn't enough time left.

DS9 could have condensed its 6th and 7th seasons. There was of course necessary closure in S7, but most of the characterisations were whacky, the Dukay/Winn arc was laughable and the war got tedious. S6 had some real high points, but close to half of it was waisted air time. They could have made one strong season with what they had, maybe throw in a Jake episode to give his character some closure and be better for it. As it stands, DS9 S7 feels like a tremendous nose-dive. They never got better than S4 on that series.
Sean - Sat, Aug 2, 2014 - 12:18am (USA Central)
I couldn't disagree with you more on almost everything you said. Season 5 of Voyager was not that terribly good. It was just more of the same from Season 4. There were some good episodes in there, but for the most part it wasn't really any different from any other Trek show. Season 7 may be like Season 4 of Enterprise (although not necessarily as good), I haven't seen finished it yet to make that judgement call, but the problem with that is that Voyager had seven seasons to make this clunker. They had plenty of time, and they squandered it. With Enterprise, it's quite possible had they got the customary, by then, three more seasons they might have been good (as long as Berman and Braga continued to not be involved). But with Voyager, they most definitely wasted their time.

DS9's season 7 was quite good. I quite enjoyed the Dukat/Winn arc and the war was the best part of the show. Those last 10 episodes are very enjoyable and engaging to watch back to back. Season 6 had some of the greatest Star Trek episodes ever made, especially my personal favorite Star Trek episode In the Pale Moonlight, but the last fourth of the season wasn't necessarily the best with the obvious exception of Valiant. Season 4 is also quite good with many highlight episodes including the attempted Starfleet coup and Hard Time, but it's not as good as Season 6 imo.
Elliott - Sat, Aug 2, 2014 - 2:31am (USA Central)
Well, you're of course entitled to your opinion, but even most dedicated DS9 fans concede that its last season was rather weak and I've encountered few defenders of the Winn/Dukat storyline, but to each his own I guess. I'll happily take Voy S5.
Paul M. - Sat, Aug 2, 2014 - 5:09am (USA Central)
Whenever I sit and watch Voyager, I inevitably arrive at the same conclusion: yeah, it's kinda fun, it's usually not boring to watch, it has its moments, its great episodes, but at at the end of the day, it's a hollow experience. Voyager says nothing of importance, at least not consistently. To me VOY is a Trek version of one of those TV procedurals that hold my attention for a while and is pretty much forgotten soon after.

I like shows that try to say *something*, that strive to be more than a sum of their parts. I can forgive a lot of bad stuff if a series at least in good faith attempts a new take on a trope, or has dynamic, changing characters, etc. If there's one thing I can't stand, it's laziness and going where we'we all gone before god knows how many times. I've abandoned more than one great looking, nicely acted, decently plotted TV series exactly because i's "been there, done that".

I don't know, when it comes to Trek, it probably has to do with whichever series was your entry into Trek; you'll probably have a soft(er) spot for that one -- I assume Elliott grew up on Voyager? It's understandable, I guess.
Elliott - Sat, Aug 2, 2014 - 11:26am (USA Central)
TNG premiered about 3 months before I was born, but since it went into syndication I ended up seeing the whole series from top to bottom before I went into high school (that's around age 14). I dovetailed in with Voyager when it aired (though I wasn't into all the internet hype at that time--too young; it was just another Trek to me). I started Enterprise and thought it was awful, so I didn't watch it. I was aware of DS9's existence but not really sure when it was on.

As an artist, i can guarantee there's nothing "new" to be created; originality is a point of view and often a fetish amongst consumers, but it doesn't really exist. You can trace back bits and pieces of every episode of Trek including TOS to other sources and slap on the "derivative" sticker dismissively, or you can appreciate the craftsmanship and particular emphasis or nuance the artists who pieced these episodes together put into them (or didn't). Was Voyager basically TNG with a new crew?Yeah, pretty much. Was TNG TOS with a new crew? Also yes. The big difference is that decades separate the latter whereas only months the former. Of course, now that they're all off the air, it doesn't really matter does it? I can switch instantly from one to another whenever I want.

Whenever I sit and watch DS9, I feel insulted, mocked and betrayed by writers who felt entitled to twist and corrupt everything Star Trek sought to be. And it didn't feel like loving mockery à la "Galaxy Quest" or "Space Balls," but a mean-spirited reversal designed to cash in on some sort of neo-gothic cynicism. Maybe you're right; if I had drunk the DS9 koolaide as a child or teen I wouldn't have liked Voyager for its return to form.

I honestly don't understand this complaint about "been there done that"--I mean we're discussing shows which went off the air many years ago. We're RE-watching them for our on enjoyment. Are we getting something new and original out every time we do this? Every time we re-read a good novel or see an play? Art is at its core ritualistic, like religion. We our souls feed on it. Star Trek, for all its derivativeness is a special kind of soul-food. It has an uncanny ability to engender hope and a real feeling of progress. DS9 just leaves a bitter taste in my mouth.
Sean - Sat, Aug 2, 2014 - 5:45pm (USA Central)
So Elliott, from what I can gather from your comments, your thing is that Star Trek is not so much a story of real people in these situations. People who naturally change because of what's happened to them. To you, Star Trek is a mythology, sort of like stories of gods and heroes who don't learn from their mistakes and never change. But that's why they're endearing to you. You see the same story over and over again and you enjoy it. You like the mythological core of Star Trek, as you see it, that was established in TOS and TNG: the stories that are told time and time again. And so you like Voyager. Because for many people here, Voyager was just a rehash of stereotypical stories that we've all seen before, but for you it was more of that mythological core that you love.

That's probably why Jammer and so many others disagree with you. We have a fundamentally different philosophy to Trek. I enjoy Trek as a story of real people in these situations. They change over time as things happen to them. They're not the same people day in and day out. No one in the real world is. We like realism in our stories, once we buy the premise of the stories taking place hundreds of years into the future. To us, realism is what makes Trek stories so good: showing a reflection of ourselves in people hundreds of years into the future who are fundamentally different from ourselves. Dealing with ideas and issues that we would never even think about for ourselves if we weren't watching Trek.

And that's fine. The two philosophies are radically different. It's at least nice to understand why you don't like DS9 and like VOY, pretty much the polar opposite of myself and Jammer and several others in the comments here.
Paul M. - Sat, Aug 2, 2014 - 6:08pm (USA Central)
I must admit I have trouble understanding why you take DS9 so personally. I dislike Voyager, sure, I can't stand Abrams' movies, but hey, I move on, deep down I don't really care. But to "feel mocked, insulted, and betrayed"? By a TV show no less? Why should you feel that?

I don't buy that originality doesn't anymore. I also don't quite get what you mean by that. If a piece of art is to a large extent unlike what came before, it's original, for better or worse. If it blatantly rehashes existing tropes without adding much of its own voice, it's not. And no, it's not faddism or "consumer fetish", at least not where I'm concerned. It's a simple function of why spend inordinate amount of time watching derivative stuff (though fun and not without any worth) when I could be watching something that engages me in a way I didn't expect.

And frankly, talking about Voyager, it's a mediocre show. Even if it had been the first Trek show on air, with no "derivative" baggage keeping it down, it would still have been a problematic, weak-ish TV series with its by-the-numbers plotting, static characters, over-reliance on tropes and cheap actiony solutions. It is an insipid TV product even when viewed on its own, or maybe especially when viewed on its own, without the larger Trek mythos and values to prop it up.
Elliott - Wed, Aug 6, 2014 - 3:12pm (USA Central)
@Paul M.

Star Trek wasn't just space adventures for me and other people I've known. It wasn't just a TV show. Trek stands for certain ideas and certain principals, and, in spite of its pop-culture permeation, stands alone in that regard. I cherish Trek for those principals and so, yes, I take personally what the franchise does with its creation. DS9 is at heart the loud-mouthed, cynical, adolescent, neo-con upstart in the franchise and I take exception to that. The "betrayal" has to do with the fact that the writers and producers were the same folks that worked on TNG and, a soon as they felt they could come out from under the Roddenberry shadow, put forward this massive dump on his memory and his vision. Voyager respected its origins and understood the value of Trek's message. Yes, from a purely TV-production perspective, there were problems, just like on all the series, but it was real Trek, even when it got dark (unlike DS9 or Enterprise). You see Voyager as insipid, I see it as inspired, you see DS9 as intriguing, I see it as insidious.

Regarding originality, I'm sorry but I can pick apart any story and identify from where its pieces were stolen. Eventually this process leads one back to mythology where all stories originate. Creating the guise of originality is an illusion, a magician's trick that writers use to fool your senses. The less the audience knows, the easier this trick is to pull off, but the writing is honest, one can be aware of this trick and enjoy the story no less. In fact, understanding the foundations upon which the story has been forged makes it, for me anyway, *more* enjoyable. I like seeing bits of Endymion and Janus in these characters, or Three Sovereigns and Five Empires in these wars. It deepens my understanding and broadens my pleasure.
Eli - Mon, Sep 1, 2014 - 8:29pm (USA Central)
I was going to respond this episode after having watched it, but was a bit distracted by the DS9 and Voyager debate in the comments above.

Regarding comment (and any others like it): "And frankly, talking about Voyager, it's a mediocre show."

Is this a suggestion that Voyager is objectively mediocre or that the author feels it is mediocre?

I understand the desire to form a consensus in our experiences of culture. However, I don't know why people feel the need to argue that evaluating a cultural work or a work of art is a truly objective experience. For instance, some people say DS9 was good or Voyager was not as good as if this statement is a fact. Consensus is one thing, but fact is another. I don't believe anyone can say as fact that DS9 is good or Voyager is bad. Sure it's fun to come to a consensus. It's fun to have a poll like the Sight and Sound film poll. It's fun to say the critics think Vertigo is the best film ever made (because it won the 2012 poll). (If anyone who is reading this is curious about the poll I referenced, it has a Wikipedia page.) But, it's not a fact that Vertigo is the best film ever made. That's silly.

Of course, Paul M. and any others with similar beliefs have a right to make comments like the quote above. Nonetheless, I feel that I must rally against the idea that truly universally objective conclusions can be made drawn about the quality of a certain work of art or culture.
Eli - Tue, Sep 2, 2014 - 6:02pm (USA Central)
In regards to the comment Kieran made that the doctor was being pardoned due to his innate fallibility:

I thought the doctor was being pardoned because it was evident that he was a sentient hologram saving other sentient holograms. Janeway pardoned him because she felt it would have been like judging another life from for wanting to saving his or her own life forms. I interpreted this to be the moral quandary.

But that was only my interpretation and I'm not certain that was the intended meaning. This point was not clear in the episode.

It also wasn't clear (to me) to what degree the doctor was aware that he was putting the Voyager at risk. It would have been helpful had this been more clear in the episode. It makes the doctor look unnecessarily bad that things got so dire for Voyager after the sentient holograms tried to defend themselves (from Voyager).

All and all, it was an interesting episode with some very effective scenes containing very apt dialogue. The dialogue between the doctor and the leader of the sentient holograms was a highlight.
Flying Tiger Comics - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 - 10:00pm (USA Central)
Any captain who didn't lobotomise the obnoxious, wasteful and irritating picardogram after this little effort should be put up for general court martial herself.

Absolutely ridiculous stuff and when you think what this show could have done... Gah.

Submit a comment

Above, type the last name of the captain on Star Trek: TNG
Notify me about new comments on this page
Hide my e-mail on my post

Season Index

Copyright © 1994-2014, Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution of any review or article on this site is prohibited. Star Trek (in all its myriad forms), Battlestar Galactica, and Gene Roddenberry's Andromeda are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc., NBC Universal, and Tribune Entertainment, respectively. This site is in no way affiliated with or authorized by any of those companies. | Copyright & Disclaimer