Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Enterprise

"Damage"

****

Air date: 4/21/2004
Written by Phyllis Strong
Directed by James L. Conway

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"I'm about to step over a line — a line I thought I would never cross. And given the nature of our mission, it probably won't be the last." — Archer

In brief: Excels in delivering a single-mindedly sustained tone. Grim, gritty, and captivating.

The Enterprise, battered and crippled under an onslaught of Xindi weapons fire, is spared when the Xindi suddenly break off their attack and allow the Enterprise to limp away. Meanwhile, Archer is supplied transport aboard a Xindi aquatic vessel and released via escape pod into the Enterprise's custody. If things were looking pretty desperate at the end of "Azati Prime," "Damage" quickly turns things around (one might say too quickly) such that things can turn bad in completely other ways.

Call it the episode's Degra ex machina. Degra, who seemed so powerless in "Azati Prime" as to be under the thumb of the evil reptilian commander, stands up and asserts authority here — enough authority to assemble part of the Xindi council (less the reptilians), who authorize Archer's release and order off the Xindi attack ships, much to the dismay the of reptilians. It's quite a whiplash-like turn of events, and Degra, while still cautious, has clearly turned the corner and seen the duplicity that his own people (or, more specifically, the reptilians and insectoids) are capable of.

Could Degra really turn the council's tide and take so much control so quickly? Would he really order Archer's release and send him back to the Enterprise rather than hold him for more questions? I have my doubts, but no matter. These early events are just plausible enough to work, and they simply move the plot along to what the show is really about.

And that can be summed up very aptly by the title, "Damage." This is a show about not simply the severe physical damage inflicted on the Enterprise in the attack, but about the cumulative damage that has been inflicted on this crew by their grueling mission. There's damaged morale (casualties and other emotional traumas). Damaged mental states (T'Pol's drug addiction — yes, drug addiction). And damaged moral fiber (Archer crossing a crucial ethical line).

"Damage" is, in short, about how when things get ugly, and when time is most definitely not on your side, tough and distasteful decisions might have to be made. In some ways, "Damage" could be for Archer what "In the Pale Moonlight" was for Sisko — although perhaps the most demoralizing notion is that for Archer there's his realization that there may be more such choices in his future. This time "probably won't be the last," he notes ominously.

The episode includes some of the season's best dramatic scenes, as well as a captivating, unrelentingly dark tone. It's a grim, tense, and thoroughly watchable chapter about the crew's response to a devastating blow. The Enterprise is in shambles, the death toll is in the teens, the warp drive is wrecked almost beyond hope, and every deck of the ship lies in ruins. By far more than any episode yet this season, this episode fully and compellingly captures a tone of desperation. It's surprising how much mileage the producers get out of trashing all the sets and covering everyone with grime, cuts, and bruises. From a production standpoint, this is effective.

Equally important is the acting. This is a battered and tired crew, and that's apparent in nearly every scene and performance. Archer's steely resolve to get the job done still remains his primary disposition, but Scott Bakula depicts it with even more seriousness and urgency, if that were possible.

There's also a brief Travis/Hoshi scene that sells the tone in the periphery. Travis, ever the optimist, reassures Hoshi, "We're getting home." The look on Hoshi's face is not even close to being so hopeful. These are two characters who have been sidelined almost to the point of total irrelevance, but the story here remembers them long enough to put them to good, if brief, use in selling the tone.

Meanwhile, we've got T'Pol, who has reached the end of her rope, although for very different reasons. Emotionally unstable and descending into near-madness, we learn here that she's been experimenting with deliberate Trellium-D exposure for months now, injecting small amounts of it into her bloodstream to unleash her emotions, first turned loose by her accidental exposure to Trellium in "Impulse."

Basically, she has become a drug addict, and finds herself here suffering from severe withdrawal symptoms, which explains her odd behavior in "Azati Prime." I've gotta say, it's something we haven't seen happen with a regular character on Star Trek, and I think it's an interesting choice, particularly for a Vulcan. It's not used as a means for sending a "message" about drug use (like, say, TNG's "Symbiosis") but rather about the point of view of one individual's struggle as she becomes overwhelmed.

There's a sequence here that's kind of brilliantly executed, where T'Pol wakes up from a disturbing sex dream turned violent, and goes on a crazed mission to get her Trellium-D fix from the cargo bay. The bay has been decompressed as a result of the battle damage, so she puts on an EVA-suit and rummages through the debris. She's nearly killed when she falls and decompresses her suit. Then we follow her back to her quarters, where she liquefies the Trellium, puts it into a syringe, and pumps it into her body. Under James Conway's direction and Jolene Blalock's performance, this sequence takes on an engaging energy of single-mindedness. T'Pol's obvious disorientation is matched by an equally obvious practiced determination that reveals a calm beneath the mania; she has clearly done this many times before. As an exercise in pure technique, this is entertaining; as a document of a character in sudden free-fall, it's riveting.

Realizing she has a serious problem, she reports her condition to Phlox, and explains that she thought experimenting with Trellium would be safe at low levels, but then, "I wanted more," she says simply — which pretty much sums up drug addiction at its most basic level. Phlox helps her detox with a side-effect inhibitor that makes the detox process come across as perhaps too easy, although the show promises future consequences since T'Pol will not simply be able to bottle her emotions after all this synaptic damage.

On a plot level, the story keeps things moving along, and includes a scene where Degra and part of the Xindi council seek answers from a mysterious female sphere-builder (Josette DiCarlo) who communicates with them from her people's "transdimensional realm." I'd say it's pretty obvious she is not to be trusted. She's a manipulator playing the roles of both instigator and peacekeeper, while claiming to want to play neither part.

Degra perhaps senses this — and at the very least wants more information — so he sends the Enterprise a coded transmission with the coordinates and date for a rendezvous. The problem for Archer is the rendezvous is in three days, a timetable the Enterprise cannot possibly make without warp engines.

Enter a starship from an unfamiliar alien race of explorers, who have hit a spatial anomaly and need help. They're unfamiliar with the expanse and have not run into the Xindi. The Enterprise offers assistance, and then Archer asks the alien captain (Casey Biggs, last seen in Trek dying for Cardassia) for a warp coil so Trip can repair the Enterprise's warp drive. The aliens cannot spare this; they would themselves become stranded in the expanse without it.

So, then. The Enterprise needs a warp coil or the rendezvous will be missed and the entire mission will be lost. Archer comes to the unavoidable conclusion that an ethical line must be crossed for the sake of the mission. He plans to attack the alien ship, board it, and steal its warp coil by force. This concept goes further than the airlock scene in "Anomaly" because it's no longer just about Archer and another individual, but about Archer making his crew, and by extension all of humanity, complicit in an act of piracy perpetrated upon a ship full of innocents.

The decision and subsequent debate leads to two excellent scenes: There's a quiet one where Archer seeks Phlox's counsel about matters of ethics, solemnly ending the conversation with, "There could be more casualties." Then there's the fiery scene between Archer and a still-on-edge T'Pol, which makes for one of the most solid and memorable histrionic scenes on this series. I liked Archer's attempt to mitigate his decision: "We're not going to make a habit out of it." T'Pol counters: "Once you rationalize the first misstep it's easy to fall into a pattern of behavior." The argument builds to a potent moment where she shatters a data pad on Archer's desk.

These are two well-written and well-acted scenes. When "The Expanse" aired and made clear the new direction this series was headed in, these were the kind of scenes I had in mind. (It's kind of a shame it took the season until episode 19 to get here.)

Also novel: We have an action scene that grows genuinely and logically out of the story's needs instead of being a mindless detour. The raid on the alien ship involves all the usual action devices already seen this year, including the MACOs, explosions, and phaser shootouts, but — hey! — it actually really matters and we actually really care about what's happening on the screen. There's something at stake much larger than who wins the conflict. It's about more, even, than the fate of the larger Xindi mission; it's about the fact that for the Enterprise crew to be victorious over these innocent aliens is still to lose something, because principles have been willingly compromised. There's a moment where the alien captain demands, "Why are you doing this?!" Archer's response: "Because I have no choice!"

And that's what "Damage" boils down to. It's about making the hard choice in the interests of the immediate needs and — one hopes — owning up to the consequences later. Not since Sisko was sitting in the captain's chair has such a troubling action on Trek been so vividly depicted.

Next week: Archer attempts to solidify a crucial alliance.

Previous episode: Azati Prime
Next episode: The Forgotten

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26 comments on this review

Jacob T. Taylor - Tue, Jul 20, 2010 - 4:10am (USA Central)
So far the best episode of STAR TREK: ENTERPRISE ever! I could easily relate to T'Pols addiction to the Trelloum and loved her awakening from a bad dream sequence while having a restless bad dream. It was very familar to me and chilling. It has been on my mind for years that not since early TNG,then Jem Hadars white dependance, has drug addiction been mentioned. I applaud the writer for not making moral judgments in this episode. No one ever plans on becoming an addict. It was a nice touch of reality in TREK. Archers decision is something that is less likely to be seen on other TREK series. By Picards time he was an evolved human, who wouldnt compromise his morals for anyone. Here we have Johnathan Archer doing just that. I also felt it was interesting that this episode was coupled with TPols addiction in doing what she had to do- just as Archer was. As is the case in many drug addictions moral right and wrong no longer apply to an extent and getting well or better to end the hell is the only thing that matters. Just as Archer is trying to fix Enterprise and make it better. Four popcorns! :)
Carbetarian - Thu, Dec 30, 2010 - 5:21pm (USA Central)
Just a side note first, I enjoyed seeing Casey Biggs in this episode even though he didn't do much in it.

Anyway, yes, more good stuff from Enterprise... FINALLY! While I was a little uncomfortable about Archer basically becoming a pirate here, it was an interesting plot choice. As almost all of my past comments would suggest, I just can't get into the Captain Archer, Super Hero Of The Universeā„¢ aspect of this show. But, still, this was a good outing none the less.

Far more successful, was T'Pol's story. Her struggle with drug addiction was easily the most intriguing part of the episode for me. The choice to deal with an issue like that gives the show some much needed depth, in my opinion.

I'm not sure I'd be willing to give this one four stars. But, I would go 3.5 for sure!
Marco P. - Mon, May 9, 2011 - 8:25am (USA Central)
I disagree with Jammer about the plausibility of Archer's release. It makes no tactical military sense whatsoever, not even with the "hidden-message-within-the-aquatic-pod-giving-Archer-a-rendezvous" subplot. When you hold captive the captain of the ship sent to destroy your superweapon, you don't just release him back into the wild. Not unless you're stupid (or have been written as such by incompetent script writers).

I also disagree with Jammer comparing this episode to DS9's "In the Pale Moonlight". In DS9 until that episode, Sisko had been written (and portrayed by Avery Brooks) as a very moral, upright, StarFleet leader (much like his Kirk, Picard, and Janeway counterparts). It is that strong moral fiber which provides the sharp contrast with what he is willing to do (and ultimately ends up doing), and is the vital ingredient making "In the Pale Moonlight" so poignant. With Archer however, we are dealing with someone whose behaviour has continuously ranged from the utterly stupid to the severely unethical. "It probably won't be the last" Archer says, but he forgets it isn't the first either. So is it significant a StarFleet captain is reduced to piracy because he has no other choice? Yes. Is it significant for Archer? Not really, despite what the writers would have us believe.

These problems aside, I will admit the rest of the episode is pretty well done. Trellium-D drug-addiction is certainly an interesting take on T'Pol's recent erratic behaviour, one which (I *hope*) will have consequences in subsequent episodes. Also interesting is how the damage (in all its forms) sustained by the Enterprise ship and its crew is portrayed. Like I stated in my comment about the previous episode "Azati Prime", Star Trek has always had the constant of great production values. "Damage"'s depiction of mayhem and damage fallout (producers "trashing all the sets and covering everyone with grime, cuts, and bruises" as Jammer puts it) is no exception.

Finally, I'm not too convinced with the appearance of "SHE" (the Sphere builder), but it is interesting to see a schism forming between members of the Xindi council, which at the very least (one hopes) is bound to give further background information on the supposed Xindi "enemy". An enemy which, at least in part, seems to be soon destined to become allies.

At any rate, much like last episode, I am sufficiently intrigued to WANT to see what's next. So not a 4-star outing for me, but well above average ST Enterprise mediocrity.
wildcolonialboy - Wed, Jan 4, 2012 - 8:57pm (USA Central)
I was actually really disappointed, because in the end of the T'Pol Archer scene, it kind of intimates that her strong opposition is due to her Trillium addiction.

I really would like to have seen some stronger opposition from the crew, and really think they could have had a better confrontation between Archer and Damar.. I mean, alien captain dude.

Archer was too angry, I wanted to see him upset and apologetic. He was a bit too swaggery considering he was really doing something quite unseemly.
bcx - Wed, Jan 4, 2012 - 9:02pm (USA Central)
Agree with Marco P.

For me, this was a bare 3 stars, and nowhere neaR ITPM, which for me remains in the pantheon of greatest Trek episodes.

I think that part of it is that I actually don't think Bakula is a great actor, or at least I don't find him very sympathetic in this role. Only T'Pol and Phlox give me any joy, and Trip and Hoshi to a lesser degree.

The rest are deadweight (and is there ever an episode where the conn officer is more than a token?)
Locke - Wed, Jul 25, 2012 - 11:06am (USA Central)
I often wondered if Archer bothered to tell someone later (The Xindi, Starfleet) to go back and pick up/help the ship they robbed... or did they just forget about it and let them spend three years getting home :P
Vylora - Thu, Aug 9, 2012 - 12:29am (USA Central)
I don't subscribe to the 'person with high moral fiber must always be as such' way of thinking. It is too limiting, completely illogical, and rather unrealistic especially under dire circumstances.

Would I bring a whole government into a war under false pretenses if it meant saving an entire quadrant? Yes. Would I pirate a ship and leave them stranded for 3 years if it meant saving billions of lives? Absolutely. Would I feel horrible about these decisions? Excruciatingly so. But I would have to live with them.

I bring this up because I have read reviews and comments on a few sites/blogs that contain a lot of ignorance concerning gray-area polemics. Life is not simple black and white and good storytelling will realize this. Great storytelling will exemplify it.

This was great storytelling - 4 stars.
Elphaba - Fri, Sep 21, 2012 - 12:03am (USA Central)
This is no In the Pale Moonlight, mostly because Archer was never morally upright to begin with. But by Enterprise standards, this was one of the best episodes of the series. By far. Nowhere near In the Pale Moonlight though.
CeeBee - Sun, Oct 14, 2012 - 3:45pm (USA Central)
I don't understand T'Pols trellium-D addiction. Why does she need to inject herself with a stimulant? In Fusion one night without meditation already made her nearly flip. Vulcans are known to meditate to repress their emotions. They don't need anything to get emotions but stop repressing them.
I don't like the way this series depicts Vulcans, and I don't like how they treat T'Pol in particular.
Cloudane - Sat, Dec 1, 2012 - 1:40pm (USA Central)
Marvellous.

You see, there's a difference between things like In the Pale Moonlight and this episode, and other things like the airlock incident and the Trip clone.

With the airlock and with that "Simm" character, Archer just doesn't seem to show much remorse, if any at all. He just snarls around being a bully and doing horrible things, and comes across as, well frankly, a total d**k.

Contrast with this and ITPM - we have a desperate captain, under desperate circumstances, trying to do the right thing... and visibly struggling with the morality of what he has to do. It's a decision he doesn't take lightly at all, and that makes ALL the difference when it comes to seeing things from his point of view and sympathising with his struggle.

This is how you do "overstepping the line in desperation" and make it compelling, not having him marching around with a scowl on his face throwing people into airlocks - much much better and well deserving of 4 stars with the addiction plot thrown in too.

I do agree with wildcolonialboy - "I was actually really disappointed, because in the end of the T'Pol Archer scene, it kind of intimates that her strong opposition is due to her Trillium addiction."
It did seem to suggest that, as she then basically calms down and says she didn't really mean it. I'm just... hoping that she kind of did, and just didn't mean to get emotional.
Cloudane - Sat, Dec 1, 2012 - 1:45pm (USA Central)
P.s. I do think Archeer was let off the hook a little bit. Wonderful that he had the chance to retain some of his humanity and compensate the aliens as best he could for the act of piracy, but I was half expecting they wouldn't have been able to take down the force field and the ante would be upped to "would the captain beam the coil out, destroying the alien ship in the process?".

I'm sort of glad we didn't have to find out the answer to that one.... I think..... but I'm really not sure, as now we just don't know. Maybe a similar dilemma comes up soon.
John the younger - Sun, Jan 13, 2013 - 1:13am (USA Central)
I would generally agree with Marco P and wildcolonialboy.

Issues aside, one of the better ones this season.
Arachnea - Thu, Feb 14, 2013 - 8:15pm (USA Central)
I'm sorry Marco P., but I utterly disagree with your statement: Sisko was not moral. He used blackmail, coercion and he was discriminating. The writers wanted us to believe he was upright, but for a 24th century captain, he certainly wasn't.
Having said that, Archer is between 20th and 24th century morality and I agree he's been depicted as childish, irrational and sometimes very unethical.

But as Cloudane mentioned, this episode was different because the struggle was shown and we could emphasize with it.

I also agree that the conversation between T'Pol and Archer was great but I'd have preferred her having an outburst after this scene, not in that scene. Her lines would have been more potent.

A nitpick, but the writers could have thought of T'Pol exposing herself to Trellium D in order to make her body accomodate, so Enterprise could equip its hull with the compound.

So, a very exciting and gritty show laced in good action and depth. (I apologize for my grammar. I'm sure it's all wrong, but it's too late for my brain to try and make an adequate translation).
mark - Tue, Feb 26, 2013 - 6:50pm (USA Central)
A potentially great episode marred by the serious misstep of T'Pol becoming a drug addict. It damaged her character for me, irrevocably. Terrible choice on the part of the writers. (Jolene Blalock agreed, as she made clear in subsequent interviews.)

Do people have moments of weakness? Sure. But T'Pol, on a mission to save a world, decides to experiment with a deadly substance because she thought experiencing emotions was fun? I find T'Pol just a little bit contemptible after this, and have lost any affection I once had for the character.
Michael - Fri, May 31, 2013 - 12:03am (USA Central)
A terrible episode! Not one corpse or child to whom I could masturbate. 0 stars!!!
Amid Robbers - Sat, Jun 29, 2013 - 1:04am (USA Central)
This episode reminded me of the reimagined Battlestar Galactica. Human beings under dire circumstances, struggling between doing what is morally right and doing what is necessary to survive. Darker character traits (addiction, desperation, even piracy) emerging under extreme duress.

This may be the best Enterprise episode so far.

Overtones as well of 9/11 and the Patriot Act; how far will we go to preserve our way of life, and what aspects of our way of life will we sacrifice in order to defeat our enemies? Star Trek has always been at its best when it served as social commentary.
Mahmoud - Tue, Oct 15, 2013 - 1:50am (USA Central)
Don't have too much to add to what's been posted above, but I do have just one question: why the heck are there two "humanoid" Xindi on the Council?

You have Degra and the other guy (the dark-skinned humanoid). How come we don't see a) aquatics and b) insectoids? If the insectoids and the reptilians are evil together, we is the former so quiet? (My guess: CGI production costs).

CGI might explain why we don't see Insectoids and Aquatics very often. OK. But for a 5-species "race" held together very tenuously reaching over vast differences and a turbulent past, why are humanoids the only ones with two characters represented?

One more thing (yes, I lied about having just one point to make): are we expected to believe Degra, having seen firsthand the damage to Enterprise, sets up a rendezvous 3 days away at warp speed?

(BTW, not going to lie, when I saw Casey Biggs there I was wondering if we were looking at the first encounter with purposely hard-to-recognize Cardassians. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think we are/were privy to first contact and first "souring" of relations between Humans and Cardassians? Think of just how massive the repercussions of Archer's actions would turn out to be if that was a Cardassian vessel he marauded and that he essentially set the stage for the massive death toll of the wars in the centuries to come?)
Adam - Wed, Oct 16, 2013 - 9:28pm (USA Central)
T'Pol always has the most interesting dreams.
tlb - Sat, May 24, 2014 - 8:41pm (USA Central)
Anyone else notice a lot of similarities between "she" and the Borg queen? Bald, pale, cold female with her shoulders and collar bone exposed...
Snooky - Mon, Jul 14, 2014 - 6:31pm (USA Central)
I don't see it as a four-star outing. I found it reprehensible. Picard would have figured out a third option. It does fit with Archer's character, though, to go for the low-hanging fruit and not really debate or consider other options. How about bargaining with the other vessel not for their warp core, but for transportation on a temporary basis? Hitch a ride, in exchange for Enterprise applying the tritium-D or whatever it is to shield them in the expanse.

The Enterprise found the ship again (which is hard to understand if it warped away) -- why not ask for a lift? Explain the circumstances and short timeline, and tell them if the humans can reach the Xindi in time, the Xindi can probably help them both out. I didn't feel like Archer really considered other options -- so turning Star Fleet into pirates is a huge fail for me.

At the very least, they could have had Archer shown later on asking Degra to send a ship to the victims, to replace their warp coil, and think of it as "borrowing" rather than stealing. In fact, while Archer regularly makes me roll my eyes, this is the first time Trip angered me, because he went along with the piracy without arguing.

T'Pol being addicted ... that's OK as a story development. I like that it shows she's been experiencing a character arc for months, and hasn't just been an out-of-character Vulcan. I do like the idea above that if she'd been using it to build up a resistance, it might have been more noble, but Vulcan doesn't equal more noble or, apparently, less inclined to addiction.

And yeah, T'Pol has interesting dreams...quite yummy, until she turns into a Vulcan Zombie!

Another thing I just don't get. Why were the Xindi, who keep demanding proof from Archer, so willing to believe the time-traveling female without proof? Why are the Xindi reluctant to believe Archer experienced time travel when the whole basis for them attacking Earth is to prevent a FUTURE event, told to them by a mysterious time traveler? None of it makes a lick of sense.



Yanks - Wed, Jul 16, 2014 - 10:58am (USA Central)
More outstanding suspenseful trek!!

My blood was definitely pumping during this one.

Some of the comments above just make me face palm...

Disagree with Marco. Sisko's committed no immoral acts prior to ITPM? Really? ... did I just read that? Did you see "For the Uniform"? He was not written as a straight Star Fleet card like Picard was. (I'm glad for that)

Archer was inexperienced, not immoral.

I also have no problem with the council releasing Archer. His ship was in shambles and going nowhere. His previous exchanges with Degra revealed Archer needed to prove more... why would he flee? Where would he go at impulse?

"Picard would have found another option" ... maybe, but Archer is on his own and is the last hope for humanity, ship falling apart, multiple crew members dead... he doesn't have the luxury of Star Fleet support and many years of command experience like Picard had. If I'm Archer I don't let them leave the first time. I seize their ship and take what I need to complete my mission to include personnel if I deem it necessary. As it was, he made every effort to not kill anyone and left them supplies for sustainment...

Archer's actions here were not "immoral", they were necessary and mandated by the situation. Do you call a starving person with no money stealing food immoral? I think not.

The only "thing" I had issues with within this episode was the reason for T'Pol's addiction. It should have been something like after her massive exposure on the Seleya she was going through withdrawals and had to take it to support Archer, Enterprise and the mission! Something other than "I began to experiment". "selfish" just doesn't fit her character. (see Twilight and even Broken Bow) She's much more honorable and dedicated than that.

That brings this episode down to 3 stars for me. Sadly. Easily a 4 star episode had the writers not really screwed that up.
Mario - Fri, Oct 10, 2014 - 3:56pm (USA Central)
Based on "VOY: Year of Hell" I have doubts about the feasibility to going to warp with the hull in that condition. At the end of "Year of Hell part 1" Tuvok warned that going to warp with the hull in that condition would result in extreme damage (and it did, with hull fragments coming off during warp flight)
Yanks - Sun, Oct 12, 2014 - 12:19pm (USA Central)
Mario,

Voyager was screwed up there. Why would anything "fall off" when there is no friction in space?
Grumpy - Sun, Oct 12, 2014 - 1:46pm (USA Central)
You see, Yanks, once the hull components are shaken loose of the ship's structural integrity field, they are no longer propelled by the warp envelope and drop back into normal space. The speed of light, in this case, acts as friction. As for why Voyager is more fragile than NX-01, clearly the newer ship relies more on the active SIF, whereas the older model was more robust. Compare this to the active safety features of new automobiles, whereas older cars survived crashes due to sheer mass.
Grumpy - Sun, Oct 12, 2014 - 6:26pm (USA Central)
Whoops! My previous comment was intended as a parody of tech-wanking, but it's indistinguishable from the real thing.
Yanks - Mon, Oct 13, 2014 - 7:24am (USA Central)
I don't know that is true. During ENT's Divergence we see Trip repel between the Enterprise and the Columbia without being dropped out of warp...

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