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Pam
Wed, May 11, 2016, 9:08am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Day of the Dove

Sometimes I watch an episode, then come here to check out the analysis... and wonder if I've watched the same episode as everyone else. I thought this one was pretty horrible. I was laughing through most of it for the bad acting and worse dialogue. Everyone seemed so over the top. And I know that it was supposed to be the effect of the alien presence, but what about The Naked Time? That was a similar kind of thing, and though the acting there was also a bit over the top, it was fun and engaging and very well done.

But in this one... Chekov was just a maniac; Shatner was at his most self-parodying; Nimoy was patently done with the whole thing (though he gave a decent performance, his delivery lacked its usual crispness); and Kelley was just a joke.

Even though we have the luxury of witnessing the end result of their progression, the Klingons in blackface were a bit hard to watch. Not only did it look like their faces were smeared with liquid poo, the whole concept of the Klingons at that time seemed inherently racist.

And this episode seemed extra sexist, even for Star Trek. Not just Chekov's attempted assault on Mara, but the way she was treated in general. Shatner yanked her around the whole time, even when she was cooperating. And apparently while the alien made the men aggressive, it just turned Uhura into a whiny mess. The whole thing left a bad taste in my mouth. Finishing this season is going to be a grind, if - as has been mentioned here - this is one of the best offerings of season three.
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Pam
Thu, Feb 25, 2016, 10:21pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: The Loss

Oh, 'scuse me. Three people.
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Pam
Thu, Feb 25, 2016, 10:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: The Loss

Watching this series as an adult, I have a hard time understanding why I liked Troi so much when I was little. Maybe it was just because she was pretty and I wanted to look like her. She's insufferable to me these days, as much as I still want to like her. Nostalgia, I suppose.

Did anyone else notice how over it Stewart was about a third of the way into the episode? I don't think he'd rate it among his favorites. It seemed almost like two different stories at the same time. I mean, who resigns their position on the ship in the middle of a crisis? Who starts packing their crap up when the ship's about to be destroyed? Where did she think she was going to go? There didn't seem to be much urgency from...well, anyone in this episode, really. The bridge crew acted mildly concerned, but that's about as far as it got. Ho hum, we're about to be sucked into a cosmic string. How unfortunate. That will surely put a crimp in my holodeck plans.

And seriously, it took four people to write this stinker?
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Pam
Thu, Feb 4, 2016, 6:40am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Bread and Circuses

Did Gene Roddenbery or Ronald Reagan write this episode? Free health care and pensions turn people into willing slaves?

I am glad I'm more than half done with TOS, because the overt sexism and American/religious proselytizing are becoming harder and harder to stomach. I hope there are at least a few good ones coming up in season three.
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Pam
Tue, Feb 2, 2016, 6:36am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Omega Glory

This. Episode. Is. Dreck.
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Pam
Wed, Jan 27, 2016, 6:43am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: By Any Other Name

"I'm stimulating him." Lol.
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Pam
Thu, Jan 14, 2016, 6:10am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: Hollow Pursuits

This is one of my favorite episodes so far. From the opening scene, to Picard's slip-up, to Geordi, Riker, and Troi walking in on Barclay's fantasy, it was hilarious. Good writing, good acting. Troi was actually useful, and Wes wasn't completely obnoxious. I have nothing to complain about, except I, too, thought they should have been running to Cargo Bay 5 (with only 3.5 mins to destruction) instead of taking a Sunday stroll.

Also, "Haha, he said flux capacitor!"
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Pam
Thu, Jan 14, 2016, 4:09am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: A Piece of the Action

Ouch. I guess I stand alone on this one. I found the plot aimless yet repetitive, and the ganster theme just annoying. The only good part was the game of "Fizzbin." Spock, as usual, was used to good effect, but no one else was. DeForrest Kelley actually looked embarassed to be in several of the scenes. When I saw the three and a half star rating Jammer gave it, I was looking forward to this. Unfortunately, it did not hold up. Not nearly as much fun, nor as clever, as "The Trouble With Tribbles."
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Pam
Wed, Jan 13, 2016, 5:29am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: Tin Man

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzz...
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Pam
Mon, Nov 9, 2015, 1:27am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Friday's Child

This episode is one big eye roll. Cliches piled upon cliches abound, along with poor editing, poor pacing, poor acting by the "natives," terrible costume design (is this where Bob Mackie got his inspiration for Carol Burnett's "Went With the Wind" drapery-still-on-the-curtain-rod dress?)... And on and on. Two stars is way too generous for such a big pile of something unmentionable in polite company. Nothing anyone said or did made any sense. Shatner was pretty wooden throughtout, especially in his reaction to the death of the redshirt. And how did that guy, "young and inexperienced" (and apparently mentally incapacitated) as he was, make it out of Star Fleet Academy, much less onto the Federation's flagship??

PS, trust Kirk to bring fists to a knife fight, yet not receive so much as a scratch.

I give this mess two smelly toes down.
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Pam
Tue, Oct 13, 2015, 12:48am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Catspaw

"Captain. A little more alacrity, if you please."
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Pam
Wed, Sep 23, 2015, 4:56pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: Elementary, Dear Data

Let me start by saying that I LIKE this episode: model ship, bad British accents, and Pulaski included. The model ship because it provides a bit of insight into Geordi's character, and I am ever a fan of character exposition. The bad accents lent to the element of fun, and it was also fun to watch Pulaski jump up from the sofa and brush crumbs from her dress when the Captain showed up in Moriarty's laboratory. Also you can tell she is thoroughly enjoying holodeck playtime.

What I DIDN'T like was the lackluster, meaningless ending. Why would Moriarty give up control of the ship so easily? I realize that the computer had somehow granted him consciousness, but when did conscious equal conscience? What is it about sudden awareness of himself that turned him into something OTHER than Moriarty?

Don't get me wrong, I love Daniel Davis's portrayal of the character: he totally sells the idea of a two-dimensional construct becoming a three-dimensional, sentient being (even if only on the holodeck). But I don't get why he would give away his advantage simply because Picard says "I don't want to kill you."

Another thing, how would he get that advantage? How is it that the Captain of the ship can't override the command of a holographic simulacrum? Surely there would be fail-safes built into the system so that someone's holodeck jaunt doesn't wind up endangering the entire ship and crew..?

And Troi's one line in the whole thing was utter nonsense.

Good thing I have a healthy ability to suspend disbelief (and ignore Deanna Troi), because I really do like this episode. Honest.
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Pam
Wed, Sep 2, 2015, 12:02pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Offspring

I found this episode overly mushy, entirely unsubtle, and the acting on almost everyone's part as wooden and unfeeling as the android who was the central figure. The plot, acting, and script bang the viewer over the head with the obvious, cliched themes. I found myself rolling my eyes at almost every interaction, and couldn't wait for this one to end. It was too much story packed into 40 minutes. It may have been better without the admiral business, which was a real distraction from the main event. But as it stands, this has to be one of my least favorite episodes of the series so far. I do not understand the undying love that so many have for this one. I may have to go back and watch "Measure of a Man" to get the bad taste of it out of my mouth.
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Pam
Wed, Aug 26, 2015, 5:04am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Devil in the Dark

I couldn't help but think that the Horta greatly resembled Pizza the Hut, and I kept thinking that they probably could have healed her faster if they had just put her pepperoni back on.

Spock's initial attempt at the mind meld was highly reminiscent of Troi's little performance in "Encounter at Far Point," when she taps into the creature that basically IS Farpoint Station. I wonder if they told Marina Sirtis to study that scene in preparation. The wailing of "Pain!" over and over again was no more attractive from Spock than from her.

All that having been said, I did enjoy the episode, and the spirit of the message they were attempting to convey. One little nit, though... Shouldn't Bones have said, "Dammit, Jim, I'm a doctor, not a stonemason!" instead of "bricklayer"?

Whatever. I agree with Jammer, three and a half stars.
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Pam
Wed, Aug 19, 2015, 3:19am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Space Seed

So I'm wondering if there's any significance to the similarity between Khan's name (Khan Noonien Singh) and the name of Data's creator (Dr. Noonien Soong), or if that was just supposed to be a tribute to the episode/character. I get it: Eugenics and building super--or even perfect--humans; what I want to know is if they're actually related within the mythology of the show.

Otherwise, I'm not a fan of the episode. The rampant misogyny, stupidity, and bad acting turned me off almost completely. Bones's sanguine quips to Khan while having a knife pressed to his throat were about the only bright spots.
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Pam
Sun, Aug 9, 2015, 4:39am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Tomorrow Is Yesterday

I liked it. Also, when Kirk throws a punch, he really THROWS a punch.
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Pam
Fri, Jul 24, 2015, 3:32am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Conscience of the King

Jammer may have missed the context of McCoy's last remark, but he certainly understood the spirit. Having Lenore crack and spend the rest of her life in LaLa land is not justice. She got off too easy.

This episode was a flop for me because it was way too sloppy. Too many shortcuts taken just to advance the plot -- they've all been mentioned, no need to retread that ground. Having said that, the chemistry among Kirk, Spock, and Bones was great, and Yeoman Rand's glare at Lenore was, indeed, classic. An interesting glimpse at Kirk's past is another redeeming feature, but still, 2.5 stars is a bit generous.
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Pam
Fri, Jul 17, 2015, 4:07am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Bonding

I agree with most of these reviews, but I felt the kid was a bit short-changed. He had the potential to be a good actor. It seemed to me that it was his direction that was off. He basically had to sit there while the adults talked about him over his head. I had the impression of a kid who was trying to be stoic, perhaps attempting to emulate the good captain. He's already experienced the loss of one parent, and maybe at that time was told to be a good little soldier, be strong for your mother, blah blah blah. I know this is supposed to be an enlightened future, but there are still slightly sexist elements to the episodes here and there, so it's a possibility.

I felt there was a subtlety to his acting that was hampered by the lackluster script. An example of that subtlety is in one of the scenes where he is hugging his "mother," and you can see in his face that he knows it's not really her, but, well, he's twelve, and his mother had just cone back to life. Who wouldn't fight hard for that fantasy to be reality, even against one's own better judgement?

It certainly had the potential to be a lot more, not to mention the potential of the character to show up again here and there throughout TNG's--or even DS9's--run. I'm hoping someone has appropriated this character and had fun with him, either in a fanfic or a novel. I'm on the hunt now. Because how many human children are Bonded to a Klingon? That's a great backstory, such a missed opportunity by the Star Trek writers. Hopefully someone else out there has picked up the ball.
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Pam
Tue, May 19, 2015, 3:02pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Emissary

As soon as I saw who was inside the probe, I knew this was going to be an exciting episode. I haven't got much to say (there's plenty of brilliant analysis here already), except that I, too, enjoyed this more than Jammer. But then I tend to enjoy character-driven episodes a wee bit more than plot-driven ones, and so I can ignore the weak excuses for having K'Ehleyr show up on the Enterprise, and just enjoy the fact that she's there. I must have missed this episode when it originally aired, because I remember being surprised when all of a sudden Worf had a son a few seasons later. I'd probably give this one at least three, if not three and a half stars.
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Pam
Tue, May 12, 2015, 7:00am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: Pen Pals

Even though it had its moments, I found myself rather unimpressed as a whole with this episode. It didn't start well, with Riker stating that he'd like to give Wesley some command experience (eye roll), then it moved on to Data rather inexplicably pulling a console apart, at his own behest. (And considering that Data happens to be third in command of the ENTIRE SHIP, how is it that Worf is looming over him in a most disapproving manner, even grilling him as to what he is doing? At least in the last episode, he ended his command to "BE GONE!" With a "...sir.")

As others have stated, the hand-wringing over whether or not they should help, since they have the technology to do so AND cover their tracks at the same time ready to hand (or nearly so) just seemed like time-filler to me. And seriously, I'd have thought Troi would be better with kids, being an empath and all.

To be fair, I did enjoy the acting in this episode, especially from Stewart, Spiner, and Frakes. Even though Data was out of character in regards to his new "friend," I felt perhaps it was intended to signify his continued growth beyond being just a machine. I would probably give this 2 1/2 stars, mainly for the little asides between Picard and Riker, and also for watching Data's struggle between helping his friend and following orders, which is very human, indeed.
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Pam
Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 5:22am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Schizoid Man

WHEN will Data learn to stop revealing the fact/location of his "shut-off" switch?? He can absorb vast quantities of information in seconds, but he can't figure this out?

I suppose his naivete is just part of what makes him human.
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Pam
Wed, Apr 22, 2015, 5:40am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Outrageous Okona

@Elliott: The way Wesley looked adoringly up at both Okona and Riker in the span of about two minutes definitely had me thinking the same thing.

I'm about 15 minutes into this one, and I'm relieved that my phone is about to die. Every other word out of Okona has me rolling my eyes so hard they're about to roll out of my head. I'm committed to watching every episode, but I may have to come back to this one.
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Pam
Tue, Apr 21, 2015, 6:09am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Child

Just watched this creeptastic episode (yay, Netflix!), and I agree with a lot of the comments. The two main story lines are disjointed and without much tension. I spent most of the first half cringing whenever Troi was on screen, but I did feel a bit of vindication on her part in regards to Riker. His charming outburst questioning the identity of the "child's" father had me triumphantly (mentally) crowing, "In your face, Will Riker!" His wishy-washiness when it came to Troi always irritated me.

As for the virus plot... Zzzz. Dr. Porn-Stache's majestic facial hair was more riveting.

The one saving grace of the episode, I felt, came from an unlikely source: Wesley Crusher. He was helped along by Golberg's Guinan, of course. The conversation after she joined him at the viewport was one of the most genuinely human moments Wes ever had. The Ten Forward set provided an overall depth to the atmosphere of the Enterprise that we didn't realize we were missing until it appeared. It was a nascent glimpse of the Enterprise as being more than just a tin can full of random people. It was also a community.

Then Wes had to ruin the whole moment by, well, becoming Wes again.

Overall, this creepy/boring episode get's about a star from me, and that only because of Whoopie Golberg's injection of some much-needed class into it.
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