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wolfstar
Fri, Jan 18, 2019, 6:43am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Brother

I'm settling on 2.5 – it's flashy as hell, all sound and fury, but nothing that happens makes any sense. Saru is solid as usual, and actually Sonequa is fine – I feel like she's settled into the role better and is more confident and assured. Low points were the action sequence with the pods, which was total nonsense, and Tig Notaro's incredibly wooden performance. I complained in S1 about Tilly being too broad and it was even more the case in this episode. None of her scenes worked or were funny (or at least sympathetic), they were all just really awkward, as was the elevator scene. Stamets still isn't working at all as a character, and the Spock material isn't working for me either (the scenes of him as a child were laughable and cringeworthy). Pike was OK, but I'm concerned that they're gonna do a Lorca on him – I have a bad feeling that being the captain of Discovery is like being the defence against the dark arts teacher at Hogwarts...

Still 2.5 despite all the above issues because this is incredibly professionally produced, well paced and acted, and very much a first chapter.
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wolfstar
Sat, Jan 12, 2019, 5:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Home

Hmmmmmmm... this was on course to be a 3/3.5-star episode, and could have been a really solid instalment, if it hadn't derailed into that ridiculous, overwrought hostage plot. Not only is it terribly written, the specifics of it are firmly in torture-porn territory, which is a catastrophic tonal mishmash with the rest of the episode (a sentimental hour in which we say goodbye to a regular character who's ill and trying to repair her bond with her family). The conclusion pulls things back somewhat – the goodbye scene and Alara's gift are excellent – but I have to settle on 1.5 stars.

The scenes on the Orville all more-or-less work, and the scenes on the planet don't. Her family's disdain for the "military" isn't properly explored or grounded – supposedly it's because Selaya is a society of intellectuals, but none of the Selayans we meet seem intellectual, more like WASPs. The idea of a whole planet of snobbish WASPs could have worked, but not as written here. The main issue with the whole episode is the script – Halston Sage is fine as usual, and it's a shame she's leaving (I wonder why?).

The family conflict is incredibly standard and doesn't ring true at all, making it hard for us to invest in, and the series's ongoing gag of aliens who speak and act just like modern Americans (Alara's family, and her successor on The Orville) is wearing a little thin. Really, as soon as Alara arrives home – at the very latest by the point she notices the light on in the other house – we know some situation is going to emerge that will put her skills to the test and remind her that her worth isn't just her strength. I actually think the climax of Melora was better scripted and realised in that sense. I don't think Robert Picardo and John Billingsley, both of whom are usually fantastic, were well utilised here.

Whlie Alara's departure is well-handled, her going home doesn't ring true (especially given the suitable treatment developed for her condition). What's she gonna do, just stay at home with her family? Go to college? What about peers and colleagues? There are other issues – Alara has trouble lifting the weight and says she used to be able to lift much heavier weights when she arrived... but just a couple of scenes previously (when Dr Finn diagnoses her), her drop in muscle mass comes as a total surprise to her, even though she says she's been working out a lot recently. Presuming the 20% loss in muscle mass was gradual, she should have noticed it in the gym a lot sooner.

I don't wanna sound like I'm totally down on this one, because there are things in here that work – the extended scene with Alara just sitting quietly on the beach, for instance, is fantastic, as is the scene of her gazing up at the stars before falling asleep. But it's a mess overall.
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wolfstar
Sat, Jan 5, 2019, 6:13pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Primal Urges

The situation with Topa (operating on an infant to make it anatomically conform to a specific gender or expectation) is more directly analogous to intersex people and FGM than transgender people. I think Seth did a good job on both About A Boy and this episode, and I was pretty critical of his other season 1 episodes. I didn't have high hopes for his handling of gender issues either, but I've been really pleasantly surprised, especially by the original sci-fi approach. I'm not comfortable with saying certain topics shouldn't be addressed by certain authors - Far Beyond The Stars was written by white guys, and the writers of The Outcast and Rejoined (great eps) weren't trans or gay. This episode's main topic is how technology can facilitate porn addiction and sex addiction, which is a male issue generally (both straight and gay men) rather than a trans issue. Bortus is not "gay" in any sense as his sexuality is the mainstream (and only possibility) for his race, but he is same-sex attracted and in a same-sex relationship, and thus gay viewers can certainly relate to him. Klyden and Topa are not "trans" as they were both made anatomically male as infants without their knowledge or consent... this is most analogous to the handful cases in 20th century America of boys who were raised as girls after botched circumcisions. The fact Klyden pressed for the procedure to be carried out on Topa is also strongly analogous to FGM, which is typically performed by women who underwent it as girls themselves.
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wolfstar
Sat, Jan 5, 2019, 9:27am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Primal Urges

I almost think this is a moot argument because it's one of those things that's going to happen, full stop. We don't even know if their society had contraception, for one thing. It just comes down to biology. The only reason kids were shown was to make the ending more emotive - the whole society had no credible basis at all, right down to the fact they were identical to 21st-century American humans apart from the women having things in their hair, and "the set of standard metal basement doors" protecting the entrance to their world, as Dougie pointed out. We know from human history that people sometimes do hold off from having kids during times of massive upheaval, followed by a boom in reproduction once things have stabilised afterwards (e.g. during and after WWII). But there's no way you can prevent people from having sex or reproducing. In other places and at other times in history, people keep having kids (or even have more) during times in which their survival is threatened, which increases the chances of their genes being passed on even if just one kid survives. Like the leader whose husband and child were rescued while she opted to stay behind - she successfully reproduced and passed on her genes. I agree it isn't necessarily moral and I personally wouldn't have a kid during a period of disaster or impending destruction, but biology isn't moral. People are always going to reproduce whatever the circumstances, all the more so in societies where women don't control their own reproduction.
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wolfstar
Fri, Jan 4, 2019, 2:05pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Primal Urges

3.5 - absolutely loved this episode, which given the concept could have easily turned out flippant and vulgar but is instead funny, smart, original and substantive. It marries comedy with drama better than almost any episode so far while picking up a key storyline from one of S1's strongest episodes and not taking easy choices in terms of the resolution. Bortus's inability to forgive Klytus for what was done to their child is compelling and completely understandable, and I was thrilled to hear him articulate it in the counselling session - and even more thrilled when the episode didn't neatly put the issue to bed in the last act, with Bortus believably saying that he's not sure he can ever forgive or understand but choosing to stay with Klytus out of pragmatism and thankfulness for his family. There is a lot of Sons Of Mogh and Hollow Pursuits in here yet the episode still feels so fresh and meaningful. It's also really well-directed.

Bortus's porn scenarios are hilarious, hot and relatable - they get the balance just right between being ridiculous and funny to the audience (especially in the context of Lamarr, Dan and Isaac trying to eradicate the virus while the simulation is running) yet being exactly what we imagine Bortus would be turned on by. I applaud the show for going there, and Gordon's masturbation line was hilarious, partly because there's such a realism and honesty to it - it's not a throwaway wank gag but part of the show's general acknowledgement that porn and masturbation are simply things that people do. Porn is not the joke here, neither is the same-sex relationship, and there is emotional truth to everything that happens in the episode - it's for those three reasons that Primal Urges truly succeeds. It's an excellent example of the show doing an episode that Trek could never do (and I'm not sure I'd want it to) and doing a great job of it. I agree with Trent on The Game btw, it's way underrated and has become more relevant than ever, and it uses Wesley (and Ensign Lefler) really well.

As a gay guy, I love The Orville's depiction of same-sex relationships, not just because it's an original sci-fi spin on the concept but because the fact Bortus and Klytus feel like real people and the fact they're in a same-sex relationship isn't the point. This isn't a rights episode (like The Outcast), a doomed queer romance (like The Outcast, Rejoined and Chimera) or a superficial-only "look, they're gay" moment with little to no further substance or characterization (like Stamets/Culber or the Sulu STB moment). It also has the balls to maturely tackle sex addiction/porn addiction, an issue that's absolutely rampant in gay male culture, in a way that's relatable yet never a direct analogy. My only nitpicks are J Lee's continued weak line delivery, the fact Dr Finn conducts the couples counselling (instead of a ship's counsellor), and the rescue story - which is very well executed but disposable and doesn't really work, other than in terms of Bortus's story. Bortus's interaction with Isaac, and his little monologue in the shuttlecraft, were fantastic.
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wolfstar
Fri, Jan 4, 2019, 12:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Ja'loja

Oh, I also appreciated the use of music in this one.
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wolfstar
Fri, Jan 4, 2019, 12:18pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Ja'loja

I was feeling 2.5 stars throughout most of the runtime, but by the end, the episode's heart is so much in the right place that I'm going up to 3. The Ed/Kelly parts are indeed the weakest - Seth Macfarlane is unfortunately the weakest link in the cast (even more so than J Lee) and I had the impression that Ed/Kelly had already worked through their issues and moved on at the end of last season (Cupid's Dagger and especially New Dimensions). So I was surprised at how Ed was written in this episode, it seemed to be a step back in terms of character development - although he repairs it and makes good in the end. The teacher guy is a welcome and well-cast addition, but I thought Kelly was written as too unreasonable with him in a couple of scenes.

Halston Sage is great, Scott Grimes's comic acting is strong, and further development of the Isaac/Finn storyline is welcome (even if the resolution of the dispute was overly pat). I love the tone of this episode - warm, comic and most of all familial - and how the focus is split so well between the characters, all of whom it's enjoyable to spend time with. (I also appreciate the broader use of supporting characters in this ep - we learn more about Dan, a new bridge officer is introduced, Dr Finn's kids are featured again, the bartender and Moosha are used sensibly, and even Bortus's child makes an appearance.) Hopefully we can move on from the Ed/Kelly stuff now.
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wolfstar
Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 5:31pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Shakaar

Fantastic analysis, Ruth.
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wolfstar
Sun, Dec 23, 2018, 8:27am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: The Wire

Totally agree Rahul - I've always seen the Cardassians as much more akin to the Soviet Union/Russia, with Bajor as Poland. The Nazis comparison is just too facile.
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wolfstar
Fri, Dec 14, 2018, 5:47pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: General Discussion

Section 31 is a retcon that was invented for a single DS9 episode (Inquisition), then followed up in a later not-quite-as-good episode (Inter Arma) and resolved in a terrible episode that showed that the concept and its ramifications were too big for the writers to address with any sophistication (Extreme Measures). Its usage in Enterprise S4 was rather fan-servicey but at least sensible and restrained - it wasn't necessary but it worked fairly well, and gave an underutilized character (Reed) some worthwhile material. The problem with the continuing use of the Section 31 concept (in Into Darkness and now Discovery), though, is that writers just use it as a cheap way to circumvent Trekkian values and make the Trek universe 'edgier' in a really shallow way - they're not interested in exploring the ramifications of Section 31's existence or the ethics of its actions, they just use it as a get-out clause that allows them to include non-Trekkian content and characters as a way to be 'cool' because they don't have the skill to write good stories that exist within the confines of the Trek value framework (which has a LOT of leeway, as has been repeatedly proven from TOS right through to ENT). Section 31 was conceived as a way of shining a light on the darker side of the Federation, but in the hands of hack writers, it's been reduced to something pseudo-edgy that can be namedropped to explain away non-Trekkian actions, characters and motivations. I could honestly live without Inquisition and Inter Arma for the blessing of no more tenuous Section 31 stories.
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wolfstar
Thu, Dec 13, 2018, 8:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: General Discussion

Thoughts on the new Discovery trailer: I could do without the stakes of the villain wanting to "end all sentient life in the galaxy". What is good, though, is that characters like Tyler and Stamets will be free to exist as people this season, rather than as plot functions the way they did in S1. Also good to see Saru's sister, glad there will be more Saru material. Feeling fairly positive about Anson Mount but not sold on the new Spock or (still) SMG - and the less Mirror Georgiou, the better. Hoping for more of an ensemble feel rather than the story once again being told from Burnham's perspective.
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wolfstar
Wed, Dec 12, 2018, 3:46am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Necessary Evil

I prefer Necessary Evil to Duet too. It's a much more natural story, whereas Duet is highly contrived and certain elements of it are written and executed in a very stagy way.
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wolfstar
Sat, Dec 8, 2018, 6:51pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

It's an interesting discussion. I loved TNG as a kid (I must have been about 7 when season 1 of TNG was airing, and it really captured my imagination) and I absolutely adored and was obsessed with DS9 as a teenager. I liked Voyager too, but stopped watching near the end of S5 (more out of apathy and life circumstances than active dislike, and I quit Enterprise after about 10 episodes (out of active dislike). I didn't watch the last 2.5 seasons of Voy and the last 3.5 seasons of Enterprise until the 2010s. I was shocked how bad S6 of Voyager was but happy that it improved a lot again in S7. The first two and a half seasons of ENT are awful, and the final, very fan-servicey season, while it had its heart in the right place, isn't as good as fans often give it credit for. I'll always argue that the main drop-off in quality occurred not between DS9 and VOY but between VOY and ENT. VOY was still putting out great thought-provoking, emotionally involving episodes like Imperfection, Critical Care, Lineage, Author Author, Workforce and Flesh And Blood in its final season. Whereas ENT S1+2 were a deadly-dull train wreck. For me, Voyager is nowhere near as good as DS9, but Enterprise never produced anything remotely on the level of The Thaw, Counterpoint, Resistance, Year Of Hell, Retrospect, Meld, Relativity, Tinker Tenor Doctor Spy, Warlord, Mortal Coil, Remember, Jetrel, State Of Flux, etc. When Voyager was at its best, it was as good or better than TNG - the problem was just that it wasn't at its best nearly enough of the time.
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wolfstar
Fri, Dec 7, 2018, 7:29am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: General Discussion

Saru is Discovery's most engaging and best-performed character, and his race is its most interesting concept. So I'd been optimistic about this. Unfortunately it was far too facile, definitely weaker than Calypso. I'm starting to think these Short Treks just aren't a good format at all.

Until now we've been told that Kelpiens are hypervigilant and constantly aware of threats, with a finely attuned survival mechanism and great speed, all as a result of being a prey species that has to use its wiles to ensure its own survival - but here they're shown essentially as domesticated and docile, and willingly lining up to be killed (by who?) as part of an ingrained religious system. This goes against what we learned in season 1.

The beacon technology essentially falling into Saru's lap, him being able to use it to not only send a message but establish a dialog, and Starfleet being sent to rescue him and him only from the planet, are all highly contrived. Yeoh is a welcome presence but Georgiou's dialog is terrible here. Saru's relationships with his father and sister are also poorly sketched and incredibly formulaic. He has conflict with his father, who's conservative, rigid and loyal to tradition, but feels protective of his sister, who's innocent and pixie-like? Gee, where've I seen that dynamic before, apart from every formulaic family drama ever?

The idea of Saru as some agrarian peasant from a pre-warp society plucked from obscurity because some technology fell into his lap goes against what we've seen of him so far and doesn't serve his character well.

1.5 stars
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wolfstar
Wed, Dec 5, 2018, 1:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S1: Dax

Above comment is a great critique of this episode that (because of its good execution, dramatic subject matter and early point in the series) seems better than it actually is... it doesn't live up to the sum of its parts.
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wolfstar
Wed, Dec 5, 2018, 1:07pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Sub Rosa

I agree with Corey. There are several episodes in S1 and S2 that are way worse, and in this season, I also find Masks and Emergence considerably worse. This and Genesis for me are enjoyable schlock (likewise the similar Man Of The People, and DS9's Fascination).
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wolfstar
Mon, Dec 3, 2018, 6:47pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Measure of a Man

I'm the same, this has long been a 2.5 in my book. The idea is great (as are the performances) but the trial is borderline nonsensical - the execution just doesn't cut it. I like Melinda Snodgrass's later episodes (Pen Pals, The Ensigns Of Command, and The High Ground) much more, as well as The Offspring, which is exquisite. For me it's not so much the fact the trial is even taking place that's the problem (though I agree with the criticisms above), more the way it's portrayed and how it proceeds.
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wolfstar
Tue, Nov 27, 2018, 5:06pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: General Discussion

I'm not American, and am more left-wing than right. I think the whole Discovery/SJW debate, while it might superficially seem a silly way to write off the show, and to fly in the face of past Trek's values, is worth having - it opens up interesting faultlines and allows us to look at how discourse has changed, and how approaches to television writing can sometimes change for the worse in response.

DS9 only had one straight white male in its main cast (and in its entire recurring cast, the only two straight white American males are Admiral Ross and Eddington), yet no-one calls it SJW Trek or would think of doing so. Not only that, many of those who dislike Discovery - perhaps even the people calling it SJW Trek (which for me is going a bit too far) - would point DS9 or the similarly diverse TNG as their fave. Likewise, TOS had an alien, an African woman, a Scottish guy, a Japanese guy and a Russian guy in its main cast of characters, with Kirk and McCoy being the only 2 straight white American males... and yet no Trek fan would think of berating its political correctness or calling it an SJW show. So why do many people who love TOS, TNG, DS9 and have no problem at all with these shows' diversity (in fact, they welcome and enjoy it) call Discovery "SJW Trek"? What are they actually getting at, what are they picking up on?

For me, it's about whether you consider diversity a starting point - an ingredient that goes into the mix to make a good Star Trek show - or an end point, an achievement in and of itself. TOS, TNG, DS9 and VOY had baked-in diversity and treated it as just one ingredient - having a varied main cast of characters (of different species, ethnicities and genders) wasn't the end goal in and of itself but a natural springboard for engaging characters, interesting interactions and good storytelling, in an inclusive future that we could all imagine ourselves being a part of. Since then, over the past decade or so, with the rise of social media and the resulting culture wars etc., diversity and representation have been placed on a pedestal to the point that some writers and creatives increasingly don't think beyond them: they think representation alone is enough, that as long as you tick all the right boxes, people will automatically be happy at seeing a member of their identity group on-screen and will enjoy the show merely on that basis - to see themselves represented - so you don't have to bother with decent writing, characterization or storytelling, or to properly flesh your characters out and give them depth, relatability and compelling motivations. As a gay guy, I'd take the thoughtful allegories of Rejoined, The Outcast, Chimera and Stigma anyday over Stamets/Culber on Discovery. They're Trek's first out characters, but Culber's characterization doesn't extend beyond "look, a gay", and Stamets is (as Zack Handlen on AV Club put it) "just a persistent vocal tone" crossed with a BSG hybrid (ie. like most of the Discovery characters, he is a function, not a person). There's hardly anything I call tell you about these people - they're not relatable, likeable (Culber seems nice, but we barely knew him) or even interesting. The show thinks it's enough to go "look, some gays" without putting any further effort in, as if that's all it takes to delight us - the shallowness and narcissism it assumes of the viewer is actually insulting. Because both characters are openly gay, we're supposed to see this as progress, when actually it's retrograde because almost no effort has been put into their characterization beyond their sexual identity, and they've thus been reduced to their identity label.

So for me, the issue with Discovery's characters in contrast to DS9's equally diverse cast (and that of TOS, TNG, VOY...) is that it's as if the Discovery writers thought representation was the only thing they had to do. The characters have barely been thought about or developed beyond the box they tick and the plot-driving function they fulfil. DS9's the most diverse Trek series but it never once felt tokenistic because all of the characters and performances were so rich - they weren't there to fulfill quotas, they were complex, engaging, relatable people who had great storylines and wonderful interactions with each other. I could say similar about TOS and TNG. Discovery's diversity feels tokenistic and surface-level, as if we're automatically supposed to find certain characters awesome - even as they constantly do stupid or awful things - just because of their gender or identity. Kira and Sisko are my all-time favourite Trek characters, whereas Michael is a terrible character and poor SMG is constantly hamstrung by the writing (as Michael's thoughts, actions and motivations have no consistency or solid underpinning and vary wildly depending on the dictates of each week's plot), yet the show almost forces us to side with her (by virtue of taking her perspective, as if she were a first-person playable character in a video game). The show essentially celebrates Mirror Georgiou as a cool badass anti-heroine, yet Lorca was character-assassinated and disposed of within the space of a single episode, via a couple of terrible lines of dialog that served to supposedly made him racist and quasi-Trumpist, at which point we apparently weren't supposed to think any further and were supposed to instantly dislike and no longer care about the captain we'd spent the whole of the season up to that point getting to know. (There was a "Poochie has to return to his home planet" vibe to it - as if someone said in the writers' room "How do we make Lorca evil?" and someone else said "Have him say something racist, then have him say 'make the empire glorious again'". It's so facile.)

That's why I think people, including those who loved previous Trek series that were just as diverse if not more so, are perceiving Discovery as (for want of a better term) SJW Trek. Because for the other Trek series, diversity was a starting point, whereas for Discovery, it's an endpoint.
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wolfstar
Fri, Nov 23, 2018, 4:22pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: The Big Goodbye

Terrible but with some good gags - 1 star. I really take the point made by Sarjenka's Little Brother above, though - TNG came straight out of the gate with 4 God-Like Being episodes in just its first 8 hours (Encounter At Farpoint, The Last Outpost, Where No One Has Gone Before, Justice), so even though the episodes that followed in this mid-part of the season weren't great, they at least signaled that the show intended to tell different kinds of stories instead of just falling back on GLB encounters all the time.
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wolfstar
Wed, Nov 21, 2018, 8:04am (UTC -6)
Re: BSG S1: Act of Contrition

Fair point.
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wolfstar
Sun, Nov 18, 2018, 2:59pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: The Naked Now

Zero stars, and a facepalm for whoever wrote this episode.
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wolfstar
Fri, Nov 16, 2018, 4:17am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Aquiel

I enjoy this episode too - I certainly wouldn't put it below 2 stars, and for me it's more 2.5 or 3. Yeah, it's obvious from the start that the dog (as a Chekhov's gun) is the culprit or must have something to do with the outcome. But I enjoy the twists of this episode, the fact it's in character for Geordi, and that Aquiel (who is well-played) comes over very much as a real, flawed person who isn't Starfleet-perfect. That she's not the killer - merely a somewhat labile and unprofessional person who is nonetheless relatable and human (even if she isn't) - works in the episode's favor. Of course, the scene where her and Geordi use the crystal - which we're meant to think is her about to take over his body - is totally corny, but again, that's part of the episode's charm. The Klingons are well-portrayed, both in their tensions with each other and Worf's reaction to them. The whole thing is rather ingenious and holds together well. I think it also works well for us to think Aquiel is dead for the first two acts, as it helps us see things from Geordi's perspective. Even if this is one of the less-good episodes from a season 6 perspective (bearing in mind it comes immediately after a run of 4 great episodes), it's light years ahead of the duff episodes from TNG's early years - the concept is good, as is the direction, the pacing is excellent, and all the guest actors are good in their roles.
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wolfstar
Wed, Nov 14, 2018, 11:54am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: General Discussion

3 stars for Calypso - strange and compelling, and I liked the more literary approach. Karl's comment above is fantastic. It strains credibility that the ship could float in space undisturbed and with full power throughout the TOS and TNG eras plus another 800 years (just how far out is it?), and that the computer would gain complete sentience in that time (especially without having any additional input or anyone to interact with). But I'm happy to overlook these contrivances for what was a pleasant and thoughtful 20 minutes with its heart in the right place.
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wolfstar
Mon, Nov 12, 2018, 6:09am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: General Discussion

They were bad Star Trek, but they were Star Trek. There's definitely a golden period of Berman-era Trek from 1989-1999 (TNG Season 3 to VOY Season 5, including the whole of DS9), followed by a long weak period of decline from 1999-2005 (VOY S6 to ENT S4), which nevertheless isn't without its strengths by any means - there were plenty of good episodes in VOY S7 and ENT S3-4, for instance. Nemesis is indeed terrible but I have a lot of time for Insurrection, a classic TNG story told with a lot of heart.

However, even during this period of decline in which Voyager (in its late seasons) and Enterprise (right from the start) were creatively lacking and increasingly running on empty, they still largely had a Star Trek feel, Star Trek values and Star Trek science.

I think the rush to serialization with Discovery is part of the problem. Let's face it, if DS9 had tried to open season 1 (instead of season 6) with a complex war arc spanning multiple episodes, it'd have fallen flat on its face. The confident, cohesive storytelling that we associate with DS9 from S3 onwards (but especially S6-7), with all the different characters and elements working in sync, is something that took years to build up to and develop - not just on DS9 but through TNG's worldbuilding with the introduction and development of the Cardassians and Bajorans and the deep look into Klingon society throughout the Worf/Duras arc. Discovery tried to roll out a complex serialised show straight out of the gate not only without having built up any foundations of it own, but also not making meaningful use of the foundations provided by previous Trek series (ie. instead of using Okuda-science, Moore-Klingons and Roddenberry/Berman values, the show threw all those out of the window and built itself around its own nonsensical pseudo-science, completely reinvented Klingons whose society, culture and values are totally unlike the ones we know, and a Starfleet that also bears no resemblance to the one we know in terms of its culture and values). I could care less about aesthetic changes like how the Klingons look, the technology, how the ship looks etc, but it's when you totally change the culture, values and science across the board that the show becomes something else, something completely unlike Star Trek. Voyager and Enterprise were bad a lot of the time but their culture, values and science was solidly Trekkian with minor exceptions.
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wolfstar
Sun, Nov 11, 2018, 12:38pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part II

3.5 for both parts.
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