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DANIEL PRATES
Sun, Feb 23, 2020, 6:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Stardust City Rag

@Trent I agree with your remarks. But actually, I was saying that the first reviews of 'this episode' were all positive (maybe the first few dozens or so), then all the sudden, people started trashing it. Is it because we got to think it over?
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DANIEL PRATES
Sat, Feb 22, 2020, 5:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Stardust City Rag

I think we can all agree that eye-patch, cartoon french Picard was pretty lame. It is right there with strip-teasing uhura from "the final frontier". The review is correct, those are ex-borg hunters and they don't know Picard, locu-freaking-tus?
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DANIEL PRATES
Sat, Feb 22, 2020, 5:07pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Stardust City Rag

Sven,

That is what I think too. I guess most of us are torn by this series. We want to like it, we have high expectations towards it... for me at least it feels that I can't decide whether I am liking it or not. I kinda am ... I think. This episode felt good to me. Then I read Jammer'a review and it got me thinking.
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DANIEL PRATES
Sat, Feb 22, 2020, 4:05pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Stardust City Rag

Funny how the reviews started on a very positive tone, only to veer off towards bas reviews after a while.
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Dan
Fri, Feb 21, 2020, 3:07pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Stardust City Rag

"Roddenberry’s vision"

Jesus.

If Trek had stuck exclusively with the above, it would have been over long, long ago. There are only so many stories you can tell with such a limited scope.

People who think Trek "died" when DS9 came out and such should probably not bother with the new incarnations, because you're just setting yourself up for frustration. Just keep re-watching TOS and the first couple of seasons of TNG. Those are representative of the "vision" you place on a pedestal. Hope "Code of Honor" doesn't wear out its welcome too quickly.

Whether an episode of Disc or Picard succeeds or not (all subjective, obviously), I'm glad that the writers are doing something different. Picard *shouldn't* be the same person we left 15+ years ago. Seven *shouldn't* be the same person we left almost 20 years ago. TREK *shouldn't* be the same show it was 20, 30 years ago. Do people really want yet another version of "starship visits planet, does stuff, leaves, reset button is pushed for the next episode"?

Also...when did people stop being patient enough to let a show tell its story before deeming it unworthy? It's not like we have to sit through 26 episodes.

I dunno. Maybe I just need to stop reading the comments...anywhere.
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Daniel
Thu, Feb 20, 2020, 3:19am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Stardust City Rag

whoa.
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Daniel
Sun, Feb 16, 2020, 2:00am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

Vashti, the planet where the Qowat Milat and Elnor live, was originally a human Federation colony planet on the edge of the old Neutral Zone--one that uncharacteristically accepted mass numbers of Romulan refugees with open arms. They helped with the construction of habitats, supported with the resources of the Federation ("archi-printers" and replicators). When the Federation decided to cancel the resettlement efforts at the behest of the member planets threatening to secede because their needs were seemingly neglected, all of that was yanked and Vashti crumbled, needing the qalankhkai and the Fenris Rangers to assist with the problems that neglect and power vacuumns engender.

If you look at the establishing shot of the refugee colony in the opening shot and the shot when Picard returns, the buildings that were under construction were never completed. If you came from a modern 24th century city, with modern amenities and fourteen years later, you're still dealing with infrastructure that looks like something from the mid 1800's western frontier because of promises unfulfilled, you'd be forgiven if you were upset.

I agree with Richard that the story about the Romulan refugee crisis would've made for an incredibly compelling series. Between the show and the book, we finally get to see a side of the Romulans that isn't some robotic functionary wearing boxy silver insulation, and it's kinda great.
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Daniel
Sun, Feb 16, 2020, 1:30am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

@DaveinMN
According to the preview clip for next week's episode (the one from the Ready Room show), the ship is a Kaplan F17 Speed Freighter.

Evidently in the 24th/25th century you still get personalized pop-up ads, except these are holographic and has animation that responds to when you flick it away.

That part of 21st century reference I could've done without--hopefully we could've eradicated SPAM by the time we invent warp drive.
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DANIEL PRATES
Sat, Feb 15, 2020, 7:40am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

So the series have now introduced a romulanesque Bene Gesserit of sorts, with a romulanesque tolkien elf of sorts. Hmmmm.
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Daniel
Sat, Feb 15, 2020, 4:18am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

And then they sang another song in Sickbay:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VFB70KL89g
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Daniel
Sat, Feb 15, 2020, 4:16am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

Okay, to those complaining that other Trek series didn't succumb to the culture of the time of its airing, I present to you the TOS episode: The Way to Eden, the flower power jam session aboard the Enterprise:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pNQYHvhnms
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Daniel
Fri, Feb 14, 2020, 8:15pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

I know that the Star Trek novels are *technically* not canon, and even the official novelizations can veer into Memory Beta territory. However, I'm about halfway through the Star Trek Picard: The Last Best Hope book written by Una McCormack. According to an interview, the author was supplied with the Picard scripts as they were written.

A couple interesting notes to perhaps color in the background--it doesn't excuse the show from omitting details or using clunky means of exposition:

The prospect of having to evacuate just under a billion people from the blast radius of the supernova to worlds light years away within a short period of time (the book says that Romulan reluctance to provide accurate data meant that they underestimated the time they had to do the job) meant that the very fabric of Starfleet's mission would have had to be changed. Refitting existing ships, constructing an armada of over 10K Wallenberg class transports was only a fraction of the problem. The Dunkirk example that Picard made in the interview was actually kind of apt--every bit of available resource would have had to been recruited, regardless of original mission. This eclipsed the scale of the Qo'nos-Praxis crisis by orders of magnitude. (I think according to ST VI the Klingon's main ask of Starfleet was to dismantle the starbases along the border so they didn't need to expend as much of their economy on the military)

That meant that much of the exploratory and scientific missions (the core purpose of Starfleet) would have had to been put on hold for years. If you were doing research in some field that required resources that needed to be reallocated, your research was effectively mothballed.

Manpower was a major consideration--a simple back of the envelope calculation of just the newly-built transport vessels: 10,000 ships x 100 crewmembers (If Enterprise D had 500-600 Starfleet crew members out of a complement of 1014, and Voyager had 160ish, let's figure they found some ways to automate tasks), we're looking at a million Starfleet officers and enlisted crew. Factor in support personnel to maintain supply chains, maintenance, etc... and you can double or triple that. You couldn't just transport and drop off the Romulan refugees at the new planets, you needed to provide resettlement support and construction assistance. (Assume that the 24th Century version of Starfleet learned from our experience and didn't simply dump the refugees into massive tent cities a la the Syrians). Millions of personnel who were originally trained at Starfleet Academy and the other service academies for one purpose, dedicating a big chunk of their career for another.

Raw resources and materiel were another major consideration--the Federation may officially operate a post-scarcity economy, but that doesn't mean that the basic fundamentals of economy are obviated. Economics, in short, is the study of "unlimited needs and wants, and limited resources". The tritanium used to build the hulls and superstructures had to be mined and processed from somewhere. In the 24th century, they're able to recrystallize dilithium to extend its life, but the vast amounts of dilithium needed had to be mined from somewhere. Tremendous amounts of antimatter and deuterium fuel needed to be spun up. Federation member worlds would be contributing the resources, and evolved society or not, you'd be forgiven if you were miffed if vital resources from your home world were being diverted to aid a species that only grudgingly accepted assistance when confronted with the information that Starfleet found out.

The Federation membership and political structure according to all of previous Trek history doesn't appear to be a federalized structure--strong central government that can override much of the decisions of the individual states (e.g., United States). It's more along the lines of the government under the Articles of Confederation, or more recently, the EU. Member states join and contribute resources and combine their political and economic clout, but each state more or less maintains most of their autonomy and sovereignty. Vulcan as a Federation founding member state did not subsume its identity and remake itself to be more like Earth. It kept its own traditions, maintained their own science academies and fleets, and internally, oftentimes looked down on individuals who decided to join Starfleet instead of the Vulcan Science Academy (e.g., Spock) Take a look at how hard it is for the EU to even decide on fairly uncontrovertial issues and get legislation passed, and now scale that up to a governing system of hundreds of billions of people with different cultural histories, values, and patterns of thought.

Yet, the Federation did agree to take on the rescue. They committed the resources and spun up the transport ships while all available existing ships were refitted. A500 synths were manufactured (according to the novel they were not of the positronic type that supported Data-like sentience), and then the attack on Mars happened.

Significant loss of life, destruction of your primary ship yard, the loss of viability of a key planet in the heart of the Federation, and the loss of all of the resources that had been committed. To start over would mean having to find some other place to not only build a shipyard, but also all of the destroyed ships. The worlds that had contributed their manpower and wealth would have to be asked to give again.

The novel depicts the election of Federation council members who ran on more isolationist platforms--supported by Federation citizens unhappy with the decisions they made.

Is it believable then, that 14 planets would be indignant to the point of threatining withdrawal if forced to contribute again? I think so. Ethically and morally indefensible, but understandable nonetheless.

Could Picard's continuing mission under Starfleet's aegis after the synth attack have been managing the resettlement efforts of the Romulans that were saved? I think the admiralty would have been happy to have him do that, since it was by no means a small task. But as he said, quoting Voltaire, he let the perfect be the enemy of the good and walked away.

Time and time again during TNG and the movies, we saw Picard apply his exacting sense of morality and standards to Starfleet and the Federation. And he usually got his way, emboldening him for the next challenge. That's Gene Roddenberry's imprint on the character and the franchise. Garrett Wang tells a story at the conventions and in interviews that at the beginning, Rick Berman assembled the new cast and told those who were depicting humans that they were to underplay their human aspects and deliver their lines more military so as to make the aliens more real. There's nothing wrong with a perfect society and perfect group of people exploring strange new worlds of imperfect species. The problem is you quickly run out of stories that aren't Starfleet officers telling alien species how backward their society is, because the Federation is society evolved. The reality is there will always be some conflict, some difference in opinions and values, differences in priorities. If there weren't, they would essentially be the Borg.

The purpose of Picard and the rethink of the Star Trek universe is to show what happens when one is perhaps too rigid when you need to build consensus and trust. What happens when your hero is actually found to be a real human being and is actually fallible? How do people who depend on him react when he makes promises he can't keep? The parallel lesson of the 21st century vs the 20th century is that you can't simply solve your problem simply with advanced technology. In our century, the optimism of the Internet and AI has been shaded by social media and problematic implementation of AI algorithms. The massive move towards battery production has raised the ugly realities of sourcing rare earth elements and lithium from regions that exploit human labor. Decomissioned wind turbines have massive blades made of resin and fiber composite that can't be recycled. One could imagine that you can't simply install a bunch of industrial replicators at a colony and say job complete. Trying to automate labor by having synths in key facilities introduced a critical unanticipated vulnerability.

The interesting story here is one about understanding your limitations yet not giving up. The Federation and Starfleet is depicted in less than flattering light at the beginning so as to show its resiliency and what it could be when the mission is restored. DS9 used the Dominion war to highlight optimism and acts of heroism from humans, Klingons, Bajorans, Ferrengi, and even Cardassians in the face of unremitting hostilities. Aron Eisenberg, who portrayed Nog, told how much he was affected by the stories from war veterans who saw themselves in the storyline where Nog lost his leg in a battle (DS9: The Siege of AR-558/It's Only a Paper Moon) and had to deal with PTSD and recovery. Kira's arc throughout the series is one of recovery and self-actualization as well. That's the virtue of serialized storytelling--you get to show growth- but you have to start at some lower point, and you can't expect it to happen in 44 minutes.

People who watch Picard expecting TNG with its "alien of the week" format are naturally going to be disappointed. It's been done already, and to a certain extent, the mantle has been taken up by the Orville. Picard is supposed to be a human drama set in the Star Trek universe, and is about the optimism and heroism of a man who knows he's not long for the world, and is trying to right the wrongs and fulfill the promises he made, in a mission with such unfavorable odds, he won the sword of a Qowat Milat. Maybe he gets to save the universe and the soul of Starfleet as well.
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Daniel
Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 4:44pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

@Dave in MN

The motion during transport thing always bugged me too--and they've done it in all of the series and most of the movies. Then again, I have to suspend my disbelief about that tech in general, since I still think the massive amount of energy required to dissasociate your molecules means you're technically "killed" at the transport site and then duplicated at the destination.

Also, remember how they used the transporter on the Doctor in Voyager when he was on his mobile emitter? The transporter effect focused on the body rather than the emitter. How would a transporter dissasociate a hologram, when it's not composed of matter? Sigh.


@Drea

I thought the same as you too, re: Picard's behavior at the social club and trying to draw out Elnor. But I'm starting to think that it's more to do with his degraded ability to suppress his impulses--like the FNN interview. Picard was upset and disappointed that he failed to convince Elnor to join his quest, and then saw the sign as he was waiting for transport. A younger Picard without the incipeint stages of his syndrome would have suppressed the impulse to not make a bad situation worse. But one that has moved closer to absolute candor chose not to walk it off.

Dunno, just a theory.
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John Daniels
Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 1:38pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S1: Fortunate Son

Bored and needed something to watch and found this series. The first episodes were awesome, until this one.

The writers must had a vacation and let the interns losse writing this one. If this was the Klingons the captain would not be giving them his dumb pacifist speech.

Any way were the other guys so afraid of them having a prisoner? They have every right to take them prisoner and judge him. If these people attacked me and hurt my family I would have done far worse to them. This episode is just embarrassing. I have not finished it but I may tried to get through it.
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Daniel
Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 9:43am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

@Karl Z (re: #5)

Actually, at the beginning of the holodeck scene in a "blink and you'll miss-it" moment, the emergency hospitality hologram (EHH?) said that the re-creation was part of a care package sent along by Zhaban.

Yet another reason why the two Romulans in Le Barre are my favorite characters in the new series. Every little scene shows just how much they love and care about JL.
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Daniel
Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 6:55am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

Slightly off-topic to the episode, but I'm really liking the faster transporter beam effect.

I suppose in the TOS/TNG era, it was a pretty novel visual effect, so they milked it for time--something like 7-8 seconds to do one side of the beam in or out.

By now, we all know what a transporter does in Star Trek, and as long as we get a cool shimmering effect, the production doesn't need to spend more than a second on it.
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Daniel
Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 5:18am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

Kid Elnor: "My feelings are hurt. I actually did think you were fond of me."

That line gave me a real heart pang, especially given that Picard basically abandoned him for fourteen years after that.
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Daniel
Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 3:43am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Absolute Candor

So even Frakes is directing it as such -- the Cersei/Jamie vibes I was getting about Narek and Narissa in the third episode wasn't a quirky coincidence. There's something intentional about it there.

It's interesting how Chabon used Jurati's character to represent "us" - a literary device used to allow for exposition. Also: "Am I a part of the crew?" Secret mole/spy vibes aside, her character is really growing on me. (Also the audiobook tie-in to the Picard/Romulan rescue back story fills in a lot about Jurati's history at Daystrom. She's not an android. Also when Picard was made an android, he arranged for Worf to take over as Captain of the Enterprise-E.)

Kinda weird that they recreated the chateau in the holodeck. It wasn't that Picard was too emotionally tied there; episode 3 established that he was always uneasy there and just wanted to be back in space. It did allow for some clever misdirects when they were cutting the previews. It made it seem as if parts of this episode and the conversation with Seven happened back on Earth. (That itself was a head-scratcher--made me think that they'd advance a little on the overall plot and then touch base back on Earth) Now we know we won't see Laris or Zhaban for at least the next several eps.

A lot to unpack in this episode; I'm going to watch it again in a couple of minutes. But this episode really pushed home the consequence of Picard letting perfection become the enemy of the good. Even without a rebuilt rescue armada, he could have still done some real good, inside or outside of aegis of Starfleet and the Federation. He was so shell-shocked from Starfleet Command accepting his resignation he gave up on his promises--even to young Elnor. As a civilian he could have still tried to help the survivors with the resettlement process. It seems to me that the resentment the Romulan survivors, Elnor, Raffi had for Picard wasn't that he resigned from Starfleet so much as he just stopped doing whatever he could with whatever situation he found himself in. The Jean-Luc Picard they thought they knew would find some way to keep his promises. Heck, he might've even saw fit to adopt Elnor--something that could've been possible after his separation from service.

I don't remember if it was a commenter on the board or some review I read elsewhere, but it's a real treat to watch Patrick Stewart the actor act as Picard in this iteration. Both directors seemed fit to have the camera linger on Picard during dialogue scenes even when he's not speaking. His wordless acting, reacting to everyone calling up his flaws and broken promises is amazing to watch. You're totally sold on the fact that Picard has many regrets and guilt stemming from his actions (or inaction, rather), and he's got no basis to respond or defend himself.
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DANIEL PRATES
Sun, Feb 9, 2020, 1:46pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: The End Is the Beginning

You guys make a good point on Picard's character development in the last 18 (fictional) years, bur really, to me it seems more likely that Patrick Stewart is now a better, more developed actor. That seems to me to be the actual cause of how we "feel" Picard different.

Another subject: Raffi is also quite the potty-mouth, isn't she? And not only post-decadence Raffi; flashback-Raffi also. We definetivelly are seing some evolution in ST's manners, uses and practices.
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DANIEL PRATES
Sun, Feb 9, 2020, 7:04am (UTC -6)
Re: Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

This movie's main defect is to take away from Kyle Kayarn's hands the job of robbing the death star plans. Not cool! I always thought that Lucasarts' game stories were canonic.

Maybe both stings happened at the same time, a plan B of sorts?
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Daniel Prates
Sat, Feb 8, 2020, 4:30pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: The End Is the Beginning

@XanderW nailed it some posts above; Patrick Stewart seems off somehow. My theory is that he is now, 30 yeras later, a much better actor: has he overgrown the 'stiffness' that characterized Picard as we knew him? The younger Picard was a no-nonsense, stiff, hard guy; this new Picard seems more of a gentle, more at-ease person. Of course you could explain this as the character having evolved, matured etc.; but I really feel its just Patrick Stewart not being able to go back to a more coarse way of playing a character.
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Dan Nugent
Fri, Feb 7, 2020, 6:35pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: The End Is the Beginning

TBH, I loved Star Trek but in all the series I had to wade through some tripe to get to the occasional good or great episodes. My final verdict on this will when I have seen all 10 episodes.
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Daniel
Fri, Feb 7, 2020, 3:48am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: The End Is the Beginning

@Booming

Actually, once you're at the flag officer rank level (generals, admirals) your rank is more associated with your billet (functional position). You're given a rank commensurate to the duties and span of responsibilities of your position. A captain leads one vessel, and a commodore leads a small flotilla or task force. An officer appointed to lead the Judge Advocate Generals corps is promoted to vice admiral or lieutennant general in the US Navy. When you're done with your tour of duty, you either retire or go back to your old position without the upgraded rank. The rank stays with the office. Most choose to retire at the upgraded rank.

If you're tasked with the evacuation of hundreds of millions of Romulans and need to command an armada of 10,000 starships and hundreds of thousands of Starfleet officers (and probably hundreds of 1-star and 2-star admirals), I'd imagine a four-star admiralty position would be warranted.
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Daniel
Fri, Feb 7, 2020, 2:58am (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: The End Is the Beginning

I really liked this episode--especially because of the introduced dynamic between Picard and Raffi. I've been estranged from people I considered really close to me--and the honest truth of it is that time and even more time makes things more and more awkward and difficult to move towards reconciliation. Especially if there were wrongs committed--real or perceived.

Raffi living in a shack in Vasquez Rocks while Picard retired to his chateau in Lebarre didn't bother me like it did others from an economics standpoint. The "new world economy" of Earth guarantees that people won't go without their basic needs, but it doesn't guarantee them a mansion or that really nice San Francisco condo Reg Barcalay had in Voyager. For fourteen years, she didn't starve or seemed destitute--she chose to disengage from society instead of moving on and doing something else when she was shoved out of Starfleet. There are inherently going to be nice places to live and mediocre ones even in the 24th century--beachfront properties, cliffside views, and high density apartment complexes in cities. How do you allocate housing fairly and equally when size and quality varies?

I also don't buy people's complaints about this being a "dark" time for the Federation and Starfleet. There is no imminent threat from the Borg, and the Dominion War--the costliest war in manpower and ships to the Federation is now a distant memory. For most people on Earth, their day-to-day lives are "paradise". Sure, Cardassia lost over seven million troops and 800 million civilian lives in the endgame of the war, and Romulans have been relegated to refugee status, but they weren't part of the Federation. On balance, it appears that the average Federation citizen, the average Starfleet officer seems happy.*

But there's always going to be people relegated to the periphery--either due to their own choices and decisions, or because they were unfairly cast off by the greater society at large. If you're on the inside, like Picard was for most of his life, it's hard to envision how people on the outside live. In 400 years, (300 if we start at First Contact Day, 2063) we don't magically evolve out of behavior and problems that have plagued us for thousands of years. Having the first two levels of Maslow's hierarchy covered by Federation society helps us move towards self-actualization, but it doesn't obviate the entirety of the DSM-(I guess they'd be up to verson 500?). After all, people like Reginald Barcalay still exist, with psychiatric conditions treated by therapists like Deanna Troi (ret). People populate that Federation penal colony in New Zealand, where Tom Paris was for a while. Starfleet itself, being a military organization, is an entity that demands uniformity and followership amongst its ranks. If you don't conform or comply, you better believe it has no compunctions against casting you out like the stuff collected in waste extraction. The Federation itself was willing to abandon the colonies on the border with Cardassia in the effort to foster peace--the Maquis resulted from that choice.

Part of what made DS9 more of a compelling watch was that it dealt with characters who had setbacks and yet tried to better themselves. They weren't perfect with nothing left to improve. Sisko lost his wife at Wolf 359 and listlessly spent a few years administering the now destroyed Utopia Planitia Yards, considering quitting Starfleet. Kira spent her life as a freedom fighter/terrorist, and now had to figure out how to come back from the war. Odo was the ultimate outsider, and O'Brien had to figure out how not to get tortured or killed once or twice a year. We meet the characters in Picard at their narrative start point in the first act. Picard was the ultimate company man, who thought his illustrious career and gravitas would let him get his way. When he couldn't, he took all his toys and went home, sulking for fourteen years--secretly wishing he was still captain of a starship. Raffi was the product of overly ambitious parents who didn't have the time to raise her (according to Michelle Hurd). She was extremely bright but tended to latch onto people who could be proxy parent figures--like Picard. When Picard resigned from Starfleet, my guess was that she could've bounced back, but the devastation of being abandoned by a father figure really traumatized her, re-opened old wounds that never fully healed. Now how do these characters recover and then thrive over the course of the episodes?

Random Thoughts:
Not sure if it's more of an artifact of editing, but did anyone notice that Jurati fired the disrupter from outside of the study? All of the operatives that were taken down by Laris and co. were dropped inside of the room. Unless one skittered across the floor, I couldn't figure out how she managed to get one, not get noticed by the last guy so she could shoot him.

Couple that with Raffi scolding JL about not at least having her do a background check on Jurati--I have a sneaking feeling she's not fully who she appears to be. Something doesn't smell right.

Speaking of smells, I'm glad I'm not the only one who's getting Jamie and Cersei vibes from Narek and Narissa.

The one unforgivable thing the writers could do to get me to stop watching would be to kill of Laris and Zhaban. They're my favorite characters out of the new series, and aside from the Tal Shiar-trained badassery, I think most of us really like them because of their genuine love and care for our beloved Jean-Luc, not just the Admiral, but the man--that they've done so for the last fourteen years.

*One note about the state of the Federation, I recently watched a clip of ST: Insurrection that popped up in my YouTube feed, and in it, Picard was commenting on how desperate the Federation was to make new friends in the midst of the Dominion War to welcome a new world to its collective that had only discovered warp drive a few years prior. A Federation that's more EU-like than US-like in its membership structure could plausibly be very concerned if 14 worlds were threatening to bolt, especially if one or more were keystone planets. Brexit happened, and there are still populist elements in Italy and Spain and a few other countries nurturing secessionist feelings. EU member states don't surrender their total individual sovereignty to the union, and I don't imagine Andoria, Betazed, Vulcan, or Trill doing the same for the Federation.

**Random dark thought. For the multiverse/Prime vs Kelvin timelines to exist, it means that going to the past doesn't necessarily change your future--you just happened to navigate back to a universe where what you did in the past has continuity. That means there is a universe with a 24th century Earth that was destroyed in the 23rd century by a probe trying to talk to humpback whales, another universe where the Borg successfully assimilates Earth in 2063, a universe where the crew of the Voyager have to figure out how to live the rest of their lives in 20th century Earth, and another universe where a group of Ferrengi and their changeling friend change the course of Earth's history after being discovered at Area 51.

***Also, every Star Trek time travel story where they worry about how to get back to the future forgets about basic relativistic physics--one simply needs to travel at high impulse speeds and let time dilation do its thing. According to one of the Trek technical manuals, traveling at full impulse for anything but short distances is highly discouraged for that exact reason.
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Daniel
Tue, Feb 4, 2020, 4:14pm (UTC -6)
Re: PIC S1: Remembrance

The acid spitting: what it looks like is he bites a suicide capsule of sorts. It being acid, he still manages to spit some on her to get her as he himself dies. Not the clearest of scenes tho, I had to watch it two times to get it.
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