Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:

Total Found: 10 (Showing 1-10)

Page 1 of 1
Set Bookmark
ZITA CARNO
Fri, Jul 20, 2018, 2:47am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: The Omega Glory

I will disregard all the political squabbling in this episode and turn my attention to what I feel is a key scene in the last act. We see Captains Kirk and Tracey slugging it out in front of a bunch of spectators. And we see Spock watching them. In fact, he is watching one of them very intently---Sirah, Cloud William's mate, who has been watching with unusual interest. And we see Dr. McCoy asking Spock, rather testily I might add, what he's doing. And Spock replies, "I'm making a suggestion." Yes. What our favorite Vulcan is doing is performing---and not for the first time---something called telepathic hypnosis, directed at Sirah. And he's very good at it. He influences her to pick up a communicator and get it to him and open it---which signals the Enterprise to get a security team down to the planet's surface on the double. No Vulcan voodoo, no magic---just another demonstration of what Vulcans call "wuh tepul t'wuh kashek"---the power of the mind and what it could be capable of: something that I have always found fascinating and which I have been investigating.
Set Bookmark
ZITA CARNO
Fri, Jul 20, 2018, 2:14am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: Requiem for Methuselah

I found this to be a tragic love story, Shakespearean in scope, about two men---one an immortal who had lived thousands of lives and the other a very human 23rd-century man, both in love with a woman whose one flaw, a major one, was that she was not human. Following this tale I was sharply reminded of Offenbach's opera "Tales of Hoffman", in which Act One finds the poor goof falling for a woman who turns out to be a robot. I sensed that Flint had bitten off more than he could chew, and he made a costly error in throwing Captain Kirk and Rayna together, because she (it?) not only learned human emotions but also human desires such as freedom of choice, and it was her inability to choose that ultimately destroyed her: her last words were "I...love..." Of course, Kirk was really hit hard by the whole thing and when he returned to the Enterprise he disconsolately shut himself up in his room. The ending is one in which I had to choke up because it was so beautiful; Spock and Dr. McCoy had been discussing the situation, and just before Bones left the room he said sadly "I do wish he could forget her"---and I caught an undertone in his voice which told me that he was giving Spock the green light to do what he could to help. And Spock did; he performed not only an act of compassion but also a powerful psychological save---a quiet mind-meld, a whispered suggestion, and a telepathic block to give Kirk the time he needed to recover his emotional equilibrium. And I thought, "If that isn't love, what is?"---I witnessed a demonstration of just how deeply Spock cared for his commanding officer.
Set Bookmark
ZITA CARNO
Fri, Jul 20, 2018, 1:24am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Infinite Regress

I haven't watched too many of the Voyager episodes, my preference being the original series, but I found this one to be a real thriller. It was a well written story centering on the trials and tribulations of Seven of Nine as she grappled with a whole slew of invading entities threatening to destroy her, and Jeri Ryan turned in a real tour de force of a performance. And when that doctor, whom I can't stand because he's always so full of himself, failed in his efforts to remedy the situation, he was forced to step back and let the Vulcan, Tuvok, have a go at it---and Tuvok came through, going all-out with a powerful and dramatic Vulcan mind-fusion (not unlike the one Spock used in "The Paradise Syndrome", by the way), joining Seven's mind and helping her drive off the invaders. I always enjoy the mind-meld sequences in Star Trek, and this was one of the most electrifying.
Set Bookmark
ZITA CARNO
Thu, Jul 19, 2018, 9:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: Is There In Truth No Beauty?

I agree 100% with "Anonymous" who lashes out at those viewers who have to get sex into every aspect of the series. I have the impression that they are all in the grip of a terminal case of pon farr. I will say that every episode of this series, good, bad or indifferent, has something to say, and what this episode gives us is a provocative investigation into the subjects of truth, beauty and what they mean to all of us. And I have nothing but sympathy for poor Miranda Jones---a prisoner of that most destructive of all human emotions, that all-consuming jealousy which prevents her from attaining her desired objective (becoming one with Kollos)---and a great big shout-out to our favorite Vulcan for breaking through that screen via the Vulcan mind-fusion, forcing her to realize this. This may not be the greatest episode of the series, but it's a good one.
Set Bookmark
Zita Carno
Thu, Jul 19, 2018, 9:52am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: The Paradise Syndrome

At one point Spock asks Bones "Do you think he's strong enough for the Vulcan mind-fusion?" And Bones replies "We have no choice." The mind-fusion is the most powerful of the standard mind-melds, and even there we have a couple of variants. We have a quieter version that occurs in "Is There In Truth No Beauty?" in which Spock becomes one with Ambassador Kollos---a true sharing of information and experiences---and then there's the no-holds-barred version we see here, the one that has to be performed in order to break Kirk's amnesia, in the process knocking the wind out of Spock. Then---in a "Voyager" episode, "Infinite Regress", Tuvok has to go all-out as he joins Seven of Nine's mind so the two of them can repel the invading entities that threaten to destroy her. Three different varieties of the mind fusion, and to someone like me who is fascinated by mind melds in general, most enjoyable.
Set Bookmark
ZITA CARNO
Thu, Jul 19, 2018, 2:27am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Dagger of the Mind

This was the first instance of the use of the Vulcan mind-meld, and one thing must be mentioned: a lot of credit has to go to Dr.McCoy who pushed the reluctant Vulcan with the urgent "Will it work---or not?" Bones may have called himself an "old country doctor", but he was light-years ahead of everyone else, and knowing Spock's formidable mental powers he insisted that it be tried. And it worked; Spock actually used a combination of the mind-meld with telepathic hypnosis, delivering in a quiet half-whisper two strong suggestions of wellbeing and relaxation and weightless suspension ---and he got van Gelder calm enough to talk about his ordeal.
Set Bookmark
ZITA CARNO
Sun, Jun 24, 2018, 5:38am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: Spectre of the Gun

I thoroughly enjoyed this episode. I saw it as two things: first, a provocative exploration of the nature of reality vs. illusion, and second, another booo-hisss at Starfleet for sticking the Enterprise crew into hot water yet again. My favorite scene was that incredible triple mind-meld, coupled with powerful hypnotic suggestions, in which Spock convinced the landing party that the bullets did not exist and could not harm them---and the shootout in which the wooden fence was turned into inedible Swiss cheese! And, of course, Kirk-Fu at its best. Yes, Enterprise met the Twilight Zone, and it was good fun all around.
Set Bookmark
Zita Carno
Mon, May 7, 2018, 3:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek III: The Search For Spock

This (Star Trek III) was a gripping science-fiction action-suspense thriller, and there were so many Moments that I lost count. Chief, of course, was the grand-larceny starship sequence, so hilarious that my sides still ache; and you just have to love Scotty for the dual engineering work he did---first, making extensive repairs to the Enterpri se and second, his brilliant sabotage of the Excelsior so it would creak and groan to a complete stop at the spacedoors! The other was the scene between Kirk and Ambassador Sarek---the turning point of the whole film. When Sarek, in anguish and desperation (a most human emotion), asked Kirk "May I join your mind?" he was, as is the Vulcan way, asking permission to participate in the mind-meld, and when Kirk nodded assent the result was something deep, quiet, beautiful and yes, intimate, a voyage of exploration and discovery, a full communication of the two minds. Oh yes---there was the dramatic fal-tor-pan---the refusion, the restoration of Spock's katra to its rightful owner, with T'Lar (as portrayed magnificently by Dame Judith Anderson) instituting an incredible double mind-meld with both Spock and Bones as part of the ancient ritual...I held my breath all the way and somehow felt that I was there, with the command crew of the Enterprise, witnessing it all. In all, one of the greatest films in all of Star Trek. There are more great moments, but these are the three that stick out most of all for me.
Set Bookmark
Zita Carno
Thu, Jan 4, 2018, 5:08pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Dagger of the Mind

A further comment: As I was watching this episode I was reminded of something I had read in a Sherlock Holmes story; he had observed that "When a doctor goes wrong, he is the first of criminals." I also remembered an expression I have run into a number of times: "Hoist by his own petard"---and I thought that this was wxactly what happened to Dr, Tristan Adams. He had fallen victim to his own nefarious machinations. Again, a very good Trek story on many levels.
Set Bookmark
Zita Carno
Fri, Dec 22, 2017, 10:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Dagger of the Mind

This was a very good, suspenseful psychological thriller on all counts. Morgan Woodward did a fantastic job as the former assistant who escaped and demanded asylum,and it was wrenching to see how he was fighting the pain as he tried to tell Kirk and McCoy about what had happened. And much credit must go to McCoy---even as he called himself an old country doctor, he actually pushed Spock to try the Vulcan mind meld; as we all know, Vulcans are a telepathic species and Spock was one of the most powerful. What we saw here in that scene was actually a type of telepathic hypnosis; he recognized that strong suggestions of well-being and relaxation and a sense of weightlessness, of zero gravity, were needed to get van Gelder calm enough to tell Spock what had happened to him. This, I believe, was the turning point of the whole episode. I have seen this procedure, with and without physical contact, be a lifesaver in a variety of Star Trek episodes.
Page 1 of 1
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2018 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.