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Zarm
Tue, Aug 31, 2010, 11:53am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Workforce

Michael- actually, this is not a presupposition; it has been established numerous times throughout Star Trek- including in Voyager, IIRC, that Vulcans are emotional beings who are in fact MORE passionate and emotional than humans. After being lead by these passions to the brink of destruction in numerous wars, the teachings of Surak became their salvation as a sort of backlash... rather than reigning in the passions that had all but destroyed them, the highly emotional Vulcans- naturally born more passionate in feelings than most others species- suppressed them completely by means of intentional discipline, adopting logic as their guide.

Episodes like Blood Fever (VOY), Riddles (VOY) The Naked Time (TOS), and Amok Time (TOS) show what happens when that discipline is shattered and the Vulcans become their natural, emotional selves (albeit in each case through artificial circumstances)... as does this one. :-) Vulcans are not emotionless because they have no emotions- but rather because they suppress them.

Well... that's my nerd lecture for the day. :-)

I agree with the implausibility of a memory-wipe technique that works universally across species, though! :-)
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Zarm
Mon, Dec 7, 2009, 11:14am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Workforce

"Tuvok is different in that he laughs and cracks lame jokes -- which seems contrary to the similarity that everyone else exhibits when compared to their actual selves --"

But recall, this is a memory-wiped Tuvok who does not remember his Vulcan mental disciplines; this is the 'true' Tuvok- the emotional being- that lurks beneath the surface; this is, apparently, Tuvok as he would be if he did not have his Vulcan discipline, training, and upbringing.
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Zarm
Mon, Dec 7, 2009, 10:08am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Flesh and Blood

I don't think the Hirogen's presence here and in Tuskan... the wrestling episode... are so egregious considering that when introduced, they occupied a network that spread from the Delta to the Alpha quadrants (Message in a Bottle)- clearly theirs is a widespread society (already established as nomadic) that appears to have widely traveled along the same path that Voyager will need to take to get home. Given this, I don't think it's unreasonable that the ever-traveling Hirogen are still encountered... perhaps only implausible that the holographic technology has disseminated this far out (unless the Hirogen have another relay/communication method).
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Zarm
Fri, Dec 4, 2009, 12:40pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: The Haunting of Deck Twelve

I have to disagree about this episode; while it was nowhere near Voyager's most stellar, I enjoyed it, in particular the confrontation between Janeway and the alien-as-Voyager's-computer.

Additionally,
"Of course, we never really find out why this is necessary. It's a plot point lost in sketchy scripting. The whole idea of shutting down the ship exists for no dramatic purpose aside from the fact the story needs darkness around which to frame its narration device."

I believe the story sufficiently establishes or implies that, as Voyager's power sources/engines disrupted the original nebula home of the alien, they must cruise through, powerless and on momentum, so as to return the lifeform to a similar nebula without dissipating it. This was clear to me, at least.
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Zarm
Fri, Dec 4, 2009, 12:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Muse

Along with Tinker Tenor and Living Witness, I consider this one of Voyager's best. (Then again, I like Macrocosm, so take my opinion for what it's worth.) It's unconventional, an interesting look at the crew from an outside perspective (and perhaps, in some ways, subtly Belanna's view of her fellow crew), and a fantastic ending practically begging for a follow-up, but all the stronger for instead being left to the imagination and used as food for thought.
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Zarm
Fri, Dec 4, 2009, 12:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Live Fast and Prosper

I consider the Tuvok-actors 'punchline' to be a little less muddled than your review suggests- I got the feeling that this is yet another play on the Hollywood 'method actor' who gets so into his role that he starts to lose his grip on reality- just an amusing archetype for the humor value. The punchlines is that, for all of his efforts and his commitment, he can never be close to the Tuvok that the real Tuvok is, as evidenced by a single, decisive confrontation.

My take on it, anyway. I enjoyed that character, though agree with the flaws (hard-headed non listeners and an idiot plot especially) in the rest of the episode.
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Zarm
Thu, Dec 3, 2009, 10:57am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: The Motion Picture

I have to agree with the masses on this one; TMP is boring, long, and poorly paced. On plot, it will never be a winner.

However, I have to agree with the majority of these comment reviews as well; the film is gorgeous. The model work offers a reality that CGI has yet to attain. The music is ethereal, majestic, triumphant; in a word, fantastic. And above all, this film instills the sense of awe that Star Trek rarely achieves; in this film, space feels like the Final Frontier and the business of exploring it feels like a great adventure; in other movies and series, space tends to be that incidental where the show happens to be set; there is no fanfare in the Enterprise gliding about it unless it has just bested an enemy. Here, everything is an event, a wonder- from the silent ballet of a Vulcan cruiser docking to the awesome, vast vistas of V'ger's interior. Things are not just encountered and swept aside to service the action- they are examined, explored- being in space, (the Enterprise's launch, a potent symbol of the Boldly going of which we often speak) encountering the very epitome of 'new life and new civilizations'- these thinks are treated as a big deal, and this movie gives the audience just a small sense of the wonder they might feel were they really there, in space, soaring through the stars- an experience they might well linger on, as well.

This film CELEBRATES the exploration of space, the Enterprise, the adventure- the long, lingering moments are a treasure, a rare sequence to stop and savor the majesty of what is happening, a pause to simply stop and wonder that you would never find in modern, fast-paced, impatient cinema. For me, at least, the long, lingering looks at the Enterprise in spacedock never bore because the music speaks of majesty and glory and, in concert with Kirk's expressions, a homecoming.

Star Trek: TMP is not a flawless picture. It is slow. But it is also a wonderful celebration of truly trekking across the stars that isn't afraid to stop and savor the moment, and for that, I love it.
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