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William B
Sun, Jun 21, 2020, 7:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: First Contact

@Elliott, re Cochrane, you mention the booze and rock music as signifiers of the time he was created and also alluded to MLK as a real life figure whose heroic legacy is...complicated by aspects of his real life history. It occurs to me that Cochrane wanting cash to enable his skirt-chasing, but brought Vulcans to the human race, seems like he's maybe an analogue of Roddenberry. He even hits on a Troi, though it's Deanna rather than Lwaxana.
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William B
Thu, Jun 18, 2020, 4:46pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

@Peter,

I don't really think my friend is a passionate advocate of free speech. He's argued that suggesting defunding the military is treasonous and emphasized that the penalty for treason should be death, for instance. I think he was being hyperbolic there but he largely seems to favour quite authoritarian means of control including on the issue of speech when it comes to military.
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William B
Thu, Jun 18, 2020, 1:24pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

(By opposes I means he thinks they should be criminalized, I mean.)
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William B
Thu, Jun 18, 2020, 12:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

I'm in Canada too.

FWIW I don't think it's exclusively a left/liberal thing at all. A right wing friend of mine (with whom I disagree politically on nearly every point) opposes *peaceful* protests he disagrees with, for instance.
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William B
Thu, Jun 18, 2020, 11:46am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: First Contact

@Elliott, Great review! My feelings about the film are similar to yours, I think.

The advantage of the scene-by-scene analysis is how you can really pick up on and explore the themes winding through the film, especially the role touch plays. I hadn't ever connected that scene where Picard and Data touch the Phoenix. The sex joke of Troi saying "Do you three want to be alone?" actually foreshadows the, er, climax with the Queen.

Anyway I agree with Peter's point that the Queen as dominatrix is a bit silly, but I think that it does work in concert with the movie's themes. It's about (First) Contact, and I think the schema is that trauma isolates a person, and then the options are to continue perpetuating that trauma through destruction, to be subsumed into a false oneness where individual consent is completely obliterated, or to enter into an imperfect but clear-eyed world of closeness and understanding with others. Cochrane wants to be [on an] island (John Donne) with beautiful women, which *is* where he ends up, as you point out, but Metamorphosis goes to some lengths to argue that it's a meaningful relationship of equals (heteronormative because this is a chick gas cloud), and only once he's "retired" from his responsibility to others.

The Borg's two-stage assimilation then seems to be the way cults (down to college hazing) work in general: first traumatize to break the person, and then offer them intimacy and togetherness. And I think structurally then the episode plays out this on several levels, with Picard's PTSD and unresolved trauma, and the eventual reveal that the Borg wanted something else from him other than total obliteration, in one stream, the Last Temptation of Data, and the attempt to destroy humanity's peaceful, non-cultish first contact with the Vulcans and the eventual foundation of the non-totalitarian Federation (and Riker and Geordi's efforts to patch things up) on the other.

The movie is a bit of a paradox. On the one hand, it is, as you say, *about* Star Trek, and is inseparable from the core of what Trek is about, and is really closely intertwined with Trek history in general and character arcs from TNG in particular. On the other, in order to make a blockbuster movie about those traits, it simplifies and streamlines character stories. I think both the film's defenders and detractors are correct. You allude to the story as having its cake and eating it too with the action elements, and it does, where the violence represents destruction. The kinky sex in the movie is a metaphor for the offer of obliteration of self. Picard being an action hero and Data being a sex toy are both weird fantasy plays on the wrong way to respond to trauma, and the movie *literally time travels to before the formation of the Federation* in order to make it seem like these are the only options available. In that sense it owes something to All Our Yesterdays too, where Spock's psychology is apparently influenced by the raging collective untamed id of Vulcans of the time.

Anyway, as I alluded to in a previous comment, I think that the Picard/Data/Queen climax is actually pretty effective, but, like, in a weird, kind of dumb, mythic way, character arcs filtered through psychoanalysis, action movie language and porn without plot fanfic. Picard needing to go rescue Data himself after having agreed to blow up the ship is kind of dumb literally -- action hero nonsense -- but is also psychologically about him recognizing that he has to go down and deal with his own trauma, to rescue Data from the fate he himself suffered, which is another way of saying he needs to rescue the part of himself that was lost as Locutus all those years ago. And it's only then that he finds out the missing piece of the puzzle, which is that the Queen wanted him as a counterpart, a willing companion, and that failing that the Borg destroyed his will and subsumed him entirely. That actually does relieve Picard's guilt because it suggests that even though he was eventually taken over by the Borg, he did manage to resist giving himself over willingly, and that Data appears to give into temptation only to turn around represents Picard's "iron" will fighting back and demonstrating its imperfect humanity.

I actually do like the Data material in the movie, SORT OF, and I think it actually does need Descent to work properly. I agree with many of the problems of Data's emotion chip, but my argument in defense of the concept has been that it's been a part of the character since Datalore, albeit indirectly. Lore said outright in Datalore that Soong chose to create a "less perfect" android ("Believing oneself to be perfect is often the sign of a delusional mind") and while we know Lore is partly wrong, he is also correct that Soong chose to *not* give Data emotions, because he didn't know how to do so without making Data evil, rather than that it was not possible for him to do so. From there we can either believe that Data is fine without emotions or that he needs to eventually find a way to integrate emotions without going Lore. Now Datalore might have been a bad idea, but overall I'm inclined to think that the failure of Lore and that Data is apparently stuck longing for something that will probably corrupt him if he achieves it in the wrong way adds a welcome tragic dimension to the character. That Brothers suggests that Soong has found a way he *thinks* to allow Data to experience emotions without going full psycho means that it really has to be addressed somehow. I think that Data's "First Contact" by itself and Descent by itself don't work, but put together it more or less works as a story: Data is completely unable to deal with emotions when first given to him, but that experience and his subsequent period in which he temporarily gives up on his future humanity (first by almost blowing the chip up, then by self-sacrificially choosing not to tell Juliana she's an android, which is an implicit recognition that the android/human gap is impossible to bridge) is what allows him to approach wholeness anew in Generations and then finally resist temptation while whole here. The sex as metaphor for intimacy, of touch, of actually being partly human rather than always looking in, is what makes the scenes basically work for me in spite of the silliness. That Tasha is implicitly referenced (in Data's "eight years" bit) reminds us of not just The Naked Now but The Measure of a Man and thus how deeply *lonely* Data's being trapped outside of a fleshy body is. I don't really think Data was *that* tempted, but I do believe that giving up his flesh (and having it be burned off in a gnarly way) really did hurt, and him passing through that pleasure and pain to be able to genuinely feel in a human way without betraying his ethics or android-ness feels like a good place to stop his arc and hint at the positive future for him in All Good Things. In any case Data's actually going through the process of becoming the counterpart Picard was able to resist being, and maintaining enough selfhood to be able to turn on the Queen at the right moment, completes a kind of loop for Picard and gives him closure.

Picard breaking the Queen's...spinal cord thing?...which is now disconnected from the rest of her, really does seem to be a kind of breaking of an umbilical cord. Again there's lots of weird imagery. I just watched Dead Ringers and I do wonder if the writers and Frakes had Cronenberg on mind (I could see Moore being attracted to the psychosexual elements and Braga to the body horror). Your pointing out the importance of Family and Picard's loss of his brother and Rene in Generations as a kind of background point out what it actually means for Picard to have to revisit his "family" of the Borg Collective, with the Queen as perverse devouring mother/lover (ew), the most frightening and enticing form of the family he'll never have. His rage is guilt -- for having been subsumed, but also for maybe wanting to be a part of something where he's less alone. That he forms an adult (and platonic) relationship with Lily in the film is quite wonderful.

It's not quite a standout moment but I do like Beverly recommending the EMH dance and hope it was an intentional "Dancing Doctor" reference. I like that Gates was given a brief moment to be funny even if it's mostly to hand off to a cameo.

Overall I'd give First Contact 3 stars myself, though it's one of those situations where it's kind of a 2 and kind of a 4. I'm pretty into it and I think it's silly; it reframes cerebral character arcs as pulpy splash pages. I think most of the bad and good things people say about the film are true.
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William B
Thu, Jun 18, 2020, 11:22am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

I'm hesitant to wade too deeply into this, but I think a few points are worth mentioning.

1. The way Elliott is using "left" is not the same as "liberal." Liberalism and leftism are distinct traditions. In some areas they overlap but they are sufficiently distinct that they can't be treated as synonymous. Now this is a controversial point but I guess it's clear to me anyway that Elliott is specifically not talking about liberals, particularly given his (largely justified IMO) attacks on neoliberalism.

2. Along similar lines, the Democratic Party in the US is not a "Left" party in the way he is using left. They are left of the Republicans, to be sure. Within many self-described Left circles the Democrats are viewed as at best a necessary evil. Even Bernie Sanders is not a member of the party but runs as one due to the US' two-party system.

3. My impression is that many self-described liberals and leftists "support" cancel culture in various forms, whether it be deplatforming or whatever. I don't have a good sense on what the percentages are here.

4. Along those lines, when it comes to the protests, I have seen from left or liberals both the arguments that the *looting* within the protests are 1) not really representative of the core message of the protests or 2) justified because peaceful protests don't achieve anything. Of course these two points contradict each other, and I think the explanation is simple: the left and liberals are not monolithic.

5. Re CEOs. I could change my mind if evidence were offered to the contrary, but I cannot believe that highers up at Procter and Gamble were showing their own radical left agenda with that Gillette ad. I think that they believed that there was a lot about #MeToo or bullying or whatever in the zeitgeist, particularly among young people, and then put out an ad with the aim of saying they're against "bad models of masculinity," in the hopes of getting credit for being on a social vanguard, in order to win support and get brand loyalty, especially from young people. I thought the ad was not intended to be anti-men but to try to be "pro-good men" so that men would buy their products. The ad was incompetent and didn't say anything, but IMO the motivation was still profit. And Procter and Gamble's stock has still gone up even if Gillette sales have gone down. Similarly for Hobby Lobby, I think those in charge of the brand recognized that there is a loyal audience in people who support its politics.

Okay that's my thoughts for now.
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William B
Tue, Jun 16, 2020, 2:39pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Emissary

@Jason, I see what you mean. With Spiner, like, it basically got to the point that one of the recurring players they'd pair him with was...Spiner (Datalore, Brothers, Birthright, Descent, Inheritance). That said, De Lancie definitely needs to be added to the list of recurring players with whom Stewart (and Spiner though that was a less frequent pairing) had bigtime chemistry.
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William B
Mon, Jun 15, 2020, 5:53pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Warlord

The "similar feelings," lol, are about how the sci-fi/possession/alien interference stuff means it's hard for us to know what actually happened (or at least "counted"). Playing some "how much was real?" ambiguity is fine and often good but it just sort of muddies things. However as I say Violations is worse on this front.
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William B
Mon, Jun 15, 2020, 5:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Warlord

@Elliott,

I like the Riker/Troi comparison. Regarding R/T themselves, my feeling is that from Encounter at Farpoint through to All Good Things, Riker/Troi seem to be in an ambiguous state, where "Imzadi"-but-not-a-full-item is an ill-defined grey area for them, where they're constantly a few steps from being an item and a few steps from being "just friends." I'm not even positive they do have any off-screen conversations that we don't see (except in and after Insurrection). I think my favourite occasion of this is in The Loss (I think?) when Riker tries to play the Imzadi card and Troi dismisses it with "Oh please." When Past-Picard assured Troi that he's sure they'll find a way to work out their awkward situation, my spouse (who I had been watching things with) said "No, they won't" in an affectionate joking tone. As you say I think it's fine that it's not spelled out to the audience exactly what they did or didn't work out.

OTOH, I do have similar feelings about that scene in Violations as I do about the breakup in this episode. To be clear, I think that the ambiguity in Violations is worse because it throws a sexual assault in there, when the rest of the memories seem to be traumas that plausibly happened (Beverly seeing Jack's corpse, Riker having to evacuate Engineering and lose a person), which implies that Riker/Troi thing did happen. Given that the show has already raised the spectre of Riker being a potential rapist in A Matter of Perspective I think it's a bad choice to muddy the waters like that. It's also worse in Violations because I like Riker/Troi (as friends or as a couple) whereas I guess we can all just be relieved that Neelix/Kes is over as a romantic thing.
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William B
Mon, Jun 15, 2020, 8:43am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Warlord

To pivot from the heated discussions of the past few days (which I haven't been participating in):

@Elliott,

"Voyager is almost never given the benefit of the doubt with character development it seems. I notice in many comments that Kes' and Neelix' breakup, for example, is treated as though it doesn't really matter because the mind control invalidates the behaviour (it's not really her). But then (spoiler) in “Darkling,” the complaint is that, because the audience apparently decided the breakup didn't really happen, it's cheating to say that it did. So, what the hell? Tieran could have broken up with Neelix for any number of reasons, but he used Kes' insight into their relationship and his behaviour, informed by his own experience and motivations. Deep down, Kes knew and felt the things he said. That's why they rang as true to *us* before it was revealed that she had been mind-nabbed. She simply didn't posses the courage or the impetus to express them. That's what she means when she tells Tuvok that everything has changed."

I see what you're saying and I agree that Voyager is frequently not given the benefit of the doubt (including even by me in the past -- I'd say more before my recent viewing, more so than during). However, I think that in this case at least what we're seeing isn't so much that people are biased against Voyager -- in the sense that if another series had done the same thing that series would be forgiven -- as that the way Voyager goes about its character development is unusual by Trek (...and, well, other genre show) standards. Generally, mind control, body swap, mistaken identity etc. do invalidate behaviour. It's true that Tieran dumping Neelix is based on Kes' own insight and feelings, but from what we can tell it's still Tieran running the show, which means that Kes didn't decide to do it. Why *would* Neelix assume that they're still broken up if Kes didn't do it? Why should we? Kes isn't responsible for Tieran's actions later in the show. No one expects that Kirk's order to execute the senior staff should hold once Lester is exposed in Turnabout Intruder. And even in cases like Shattered Mirror, the fact that Sisko behaved *plausibly* as his MU counterpart doesn't mean that MU Jadzia and Bashir just accept his behaviour: they're (justifiably) upset at his deception, and don't count his actions as MU Sisko's. Now that the breakup "counts" because Tieran was expressing something real about Kes is hinted at by Kes saying that things have changed for her, sure. It's a plausible read and one that the series bears out. But I don't think it's purely anti-Voyager bias for people to be confused by this point.

For my part, I think that most likely Neelix and Kes would have had to have *a* conversation where she says that they're still broken up, because otherwise I don't see how Neelix would "know" that it counted. It's possible though he just intuits that he should give Kes space and then eventually just sort of realizes that they're over. Based on their dialogue in The Gift, it seems likely that Neelix is bewildered by this and doesn't really know which parts of their on screen breakup conversation he should take to heart. This confusion and despondency makes sense also of where Neelix is by the time we get to Fair Trade, and that neither Neelix nor Kes have the courage to delve deeper makes sense to me.
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William B
Sat, Jun 13, 2020, 8:57am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

@Elliott you'd better not try writing about Riker then!
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William B
Thu, Jun 11, 2020, 4:19pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

Without wading too deep here, Elliott you seem to have put the decimal in the wrong place: 5/85 *is* (approx) 6%.
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William B
Thu, Jun 11, 2020, 9:57am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

Burton did deserve better, but I think there is something interesting about having Geordi struggle with connecting with people except when mediated through technology -- which is what the original Booby Trap episode was about, and which is related to his closeness with Data. It's tied in with his engineering work, his disability and VISOR, his unique way of seeing the world, it's part of what makes him exploited (The Mind's Eye) etc. Galaxy's Child, Aquiel, Interface, and Force of Nature were also on this theme but were not exactly good at it. Maybe The Next Phase (which I generally like) can be added to the list. To be clear, I'm not saying that engineers or people with disabilities in general always struggle with the same things as Geordi, but I guess the ways in which he was somewhat alienated felt believable to me most of the time, even if most of the episodes about it didn't work. I often feel like the writers were on the verge of a breakthrough with Geordi in terms of his relationship with technology, friendliness but slight alienation from others, VISOR as "seeing" differently from most and the pros/cons of that, maybe connected with both mild ASD and disability, but only sort of danced around it. Interesting still but incomplete.
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William B
Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 7:38pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: The Ascent

@Elliott,

Re your DBI, I randomly flashed back to Beverly trying to bring Geordi into her Gilbert and Sullivan production at the opening of Disaster. This is a tiny moment, but it does suggest something about the cultural and social environment on the ship, and TNG especially goes out of its way to show how creative art, both individual and communal, is a part of everyday life more so for the crew than is true at many workplaces. Similar with Picard's anachronistic statement about Fermat's Last Theorem, where the point is that explorer diplomats are interested in mathematical history. Neither couldn't happen in a modern show in principle (well, okay the Fermat one) in that they don't have any aliens or whatever but they are still underscoring what's different about the TNG world from our own. To avoid overly TNG boosting, I'm sure there are a number of other scenes that don't do much of this kind of work.

In general it interests me what it is that makes an episode of a serial belong to it. I've been watching old Twilight Zone and it's not just the framing narration that tends to make the episodes belong to the TZ, including the bad ones, even though episodes differ in tone, theme, message, cinematography, etc. Partly the show's conception is that the TZ means that it can do a grab bag of sf/F/horror elements, and yet with few exceptions the show is reliably in "the middle ground between light and shadow," genre stories intended to put ordinary people in extraordinary situations, or to present an extraordinary situation and then reveal its ordinariness, or some such.

With TNG, I felt like Too Short A Season didn't really feel like a TNG episode, because the main cast had so little to do and the show is not structured as an anthology, and Jameson (possibly named after a Twilight Zone character IIRC) arguably didn't do enough to earn our interest. This is essentially a complaint about form rather than content, but it still felt jarring even in a season where nothing made sense. That is neither here nor there.

I do appreciate here that Quark has a specific kind of strength of will Odo doesn't. The bottom line is, Quark wants to live. He knows he wants to live. And it's not actually acquisition but his family and friends that drive him on. Odo is not there yet.

I agree with the rating. I think the episode A plot is good, but very thin. The B plot is weaker but not bad.
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William B
Mon, Jun 8, 2020, 1:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: The Savage Curtain

@Peter, That was sort of the point I was trying to make -- that Lincoln wasn't using a term that was originally designed to be offensive.

@Booming, In terms of the repetition of the slur, I was trying to take the "you should just say the word you're referring to rather than dance around it," but I went back and forth. I'm not positive I made the right call.
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William B
Mon, Jun 8, 2020, 10:37am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: The Savage Curtain

@Peter, I wasn't so much bringing up the contemporary 1960's usage as the absolute arbiter of how the scene goes, as to the comparison to the use of "G***" that Sleeper Agent suggested. To the extent that it was being viewed as derogatory in the 1960's, it was not to the same extent as something that began as and was always a racial slur. If some activist against American involvement in the war in Vietnam, for example -- like Martin Luther King, for that matter -- used a similar term in the future to a Korean crew member, I don't think it would be possible for the scene to play the same way.
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William B
Mon, Jun 8, 2020, 8:35am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: The Savage Curtain

@Jason R. "Not sure what would be gained by lecturing the Lincoln apparition."

Thanks for this, I found this line indescribably funny. I can just imagine "Piss off, ghost!"

@Jason and Sleeper Agent

My brief research suggests some black activists, like Malcolm X, viewed it as derogatory in the 1960's, but there seems to be disagreement (Martin Luther King Jr. famously used Negro in his I Have a Dream speech earlier in 1963). I don't know if anyone was saying "Negress" in the 1960's though.

I think here there's a difference between in- and out-of-universe. The scene was probably there to make a point that in the post-racism future, Lincoln needn't worry about unintentional offense because race is no longer a sore spot with anyone. Whether or not this is a good point for the writers to make is its own issue, separate from what the appropriate thing for Kirk and Uhura to say to an alien space ghost hologram of Abraham Lincoln about to do battle with villains to demonstrate to a lava monster which is best of good and evil. In-universe, I think it's pretty reasonable to just slide past whatever antiquated gibberish is being said by Lincoln. It's not even like he's somebody's grampa who hasn't updated his terminology and so embarrasses himself; he's a five-century-old mirage probably about to disappear, so it seems probable that it's best for everyone to move on without bothering to do much comment or bringing him up to speed. Out-of-universe we can question the scene on various grounds.
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William B
Sat, Jun 6, 2020, 12:45pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Future's End, Part II

@Peter, totally agree about Paris. I think that what they were originally going for is what I said but they dropped that relatively quickly, and even the effective uses of him later on (I like some of the stuff between him and Torres and Kim) largely didn't use this aspect of the character.

@Elliott, I did see much of her show. I agree that she is stronger with satire than sincerity, and indeed her satirical bits usually deploy mock-sincerity in a way that she's better at than the real thing, as an actress. Your reference to her as a B+ politico indicates that she's maybe stronger at sincerity when she's actually being herself than as an actress, which I agree with. I would maybe have to rewatch this two parter to confirm my memory that she was all right.
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William B
Fri, Jun 5, 2020, 1:12pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Future's End, Part II

@Elliott,

One thing I liked about the Paris/Rain stuff -- which I think I somewhat alluded to, but maybe didn't develop as much as I meant to -- is that they match up well because Rain is a particularly forward-thinking 20th century human and Tom is a particularly nostalgic 24th century human. Compared to Rain's experience, Tom is incredibly altruistic, level-headed, able to consider others' needs, etc. Compared to the Voyager crew, he's kind of impulsive and glory-seeking, an ex-con even, though he's getting better. In some ways the purpose of having Paris as a lead character (and my understanding was that in the initial conception he would be even more central) is that he's more relatable to 20th century human viewers than the typical Federation citizen, in that his flaws and even virtues are closer to what we expect in a hero these days. Arguably Paris' nostalgia specifically for 20th century *depictions* of humanity's future is him trying to find a way to fit himself into the Federation by reimagining the Federation's fundamental mission in heroic terms which might be achievable for him (since he never felt equal to his father's interpretation, as represented by Janeway). I think it's helpful for him and his arc to be able to see himself as actually belonging to the Starfleet ethos rather than being a talented pilot and moral failure. Rain's sitcommy Freakasaurus reaction to Tuvok, as well as being an update on Kirk/Spock/Gillian, underscores Paris' utility in bridging the gap between 20th century and 24th century values, for Rain-types who aspire to a better future but are still trapped in the present (well, 24 years ago now). I find the actual execution in part 2 pretty boring but I think it's a good idea, and fits in with your general thesis that the episode has a bunch of good-not-great ideas rushed through. (I also think I like Silverman more than you do.)

"Bubba and the gang burst in and say “the Feds are comin'!” So that's that." The Fed[eration crew member]s, indeed.

"Did I say stupid clichés? Well guess what. Janeway is going to launch a photon torpedo at the timeship *manually.* This is one of those things they do occasionally on Trek that I absolutely hate. Like when Picard had to take the helm in “Booby Trap,” the writers sometimes feel the need to turn the protagonists into action heroes. Gross."

I'm not wild about that in Booby Trap either, but it's somewhat more thematically appropriate for that episode. Geordi has to solve the problem unmediated by technology, and Picard solves his part of the problem not only without the computer but without the full infrastructure of the crew. It's sketchy but I think it fits into the "life experienced directly" material of the ep. I don't really see what the point of doing it in this episode is.
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William B
Sat, May 30, 2020, 5:52pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Rascals

I like The Game too! I just think that the crew has to be somewhat easily subdued for the plot to work.
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William B
Sat, May 30, 2020, 9:40am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Rascals

"I think the B plot with the Ferengi would've worked OK even if it was exactly the same plot, just not with the Ferengi. Maybe rogue Klingons (the whole mining part could be left out since that's not really their thing...ok except for Lursa and B'etor apparently), or some other species."

I'm not sure if this is the point to which you refer, but: I think the exigencies of the plot are that the enemy had to be pathetic enough to be plausibly outmatched by children (or at least adults posing as children), which causes the other side of the problem, which is that the adult crew looks much worse in falling to them. It's the same problem as in The Game, though there it's the teen/young adult Wesley and Robin who play the role.
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William B
Thu, May 28, 2020, 9:50am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Pathfinder

RIP Richard Herd. In addition to Admiral Paris, where he stepped into a character built up in the series' history with aplomb, I really enjoyed his performance as Wilhelm in Seinfeld.
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William B
Mon, May 25, 2020, 1:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: The Omega Glory

I don't know what you're talking aboot.
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William B
Sat, May 23, 2020, 9:47am (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: Et in Arcadia Ego, Part 2

Having still not seen "Picard," I'll add that sops to Patrick Stewart's vanity (or kooky ideas) have been present since at least Captain's Holiday. Stewart is a big enough draw and important enough for the franchise that it's probably worth granting him the occasional dumb idea. Captain's Holiday was pretty silly but if we have to have a Captain's Holiday in order to have Yesterday's Enterprise, Best of Both Worlds, The Defector, Sarek, The Offspring, The Survivors etc., then fine, go have your low-budget Indiana Jones adventure sir. By the films the ratio was arguably off, where the "arguably" is only how much of the problem with the films was because of Stewart's input and how much for the various other problems.
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William B
Thu, May 21, 2020, 10:22am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Future's End, Part I

@Booming, I enjoyed Community s1-3. I might check out s5-6 at some point; I had heard about s4 and didn't bother with it.

@Elliott, I have watched Better Call Saul (except the most recent season), and IMO the weakest parts of the show are the attempts to tie-in with Breaking Bad. The arcs of the original characters are interesting, including (in many respects) the show's version of Saul himself, who is pretty distinct from Breaking Bad's version (even if we know who he'll eventually become). El Camino was okay but felt redundant. Unless there's something in the most recent season of BCS I don't think any touched on Grey Matter. I doubt it, because I don't think the timeline fits.
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