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William B
Tue, Dec 18, 2018, 6:48am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Distant Voices

@Springy,

"--I thought "Julian's" (I'm confused about this actor's name) performance was very uneven, some winceworthy parts and some good parts."

He went by Siddig El Fadil in s1-3, then changed his name to Alexander Siddig for s4-7. I think he was called Sid by cast members. So...Siddig is probably the simplest way to refer to him, for all seasons :)

"--Letheans almost always lethal. Subtly thy name is not "Distant Voices.""

I also thought the name was a reference to the river of forgetfulness surrounding Hades from Greek mythology (like Lethe's bramble from OMWF -- from Buffy from those not in the know). Of course lethal has the same root. Parts of Bashir are "forgotten" as they die off and he prematurely ages.

"--I wondered about Garak's holobook gift, too: The Cardassian mystery where everyone's guilty, you just have to figure out how each one is guilty. But Julian is human and he gives himself more of a human mystery story, the kind where the suspects drop off to one. At least, that's what I think is going on there. The writers surprisingly forgot to have Julian say, "Ah-hah, so you're the guilty one, Garak! You're actually the Lethean! I've figured it out just like in a the human mystery novel, just as we talked about in Scene One!" So I can't be sure. :)"

Maybe, it's also a signal that even though the mystery is solved at the end -- the Lethean did it, and it was "Garak" who represented him in story -- there is still a question. If everyone is guilty of something, and the question is to determine who is guilty of what, what is Bashir guilty of? We get some possibilities, but Bashir shoots them down -- he's "guilty" of not acing his medical exam, of not succeeding with Jadzia, of aging at all, etc., but those aren't it. Maybe something to ponder.

Garak is fun but even there, I tend to prefer actual-Garak over dreamscape-fake-alien Garak.
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William B
Thu, Dec 13, 2018, 10:35pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

@Iceman,

"Don't be sad. Though I believe what Rene Echevarria said about TNG w/r/t DS9 was accurate, it should just make you all the more impressed that TNG so often managed to thrive under those conditions."

Yeah, that's a good point, and I do think that too. It reminds me about Piller's pride about getting stories to work within the Roddenberry box. And part of my love for TNG is that the constraint was to find ways to make the characters and situations feel real and believable while trying to show humans behaving generally better than 1) they do now, and 2) than they often behave in fiction, because of the various pragmatic requirements of what makes stories entertaining. It's not easy to do that. I do feel a bit less happy with the implications that the writers were overall sometimes unhappy with their creation, but even there I get that it's mostly a relative thing. I can see how writing for DS9 -- which, to be clear, I still think is a very good show, even though I can be down on it some of the time -- would be more rewarding and that's not really a slight against TNG.
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William B
Wed, Dec 12, 2018, 5:23pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Prototype

@Elliott,

I was thinking while reading your review that the robots' continuing fighting some old, long-over battle might be a parallel for B'Elanna. B'Elanna is still angry over wounds that happened years ago (and indeed seems to be holding onto anger over things that weren't even related to her -- from her parents, from the Maquis injuries, etc.) and are no longer relevant to her current situation, and it's got the potential to ruin her life (and do damage to those around her). The episode makes sense of being about B'Elanna's fear that whatever she creates will pass along the cycle of anger, and here the fear extends into her professional life.
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William B
Wed, Dec 12, 2018, 1:34pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Meridian

@Springy, lmao. Your writeup almost makes having watched the ep worth it.
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William B
Tue, Dec 11, 2018, 7:05pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Necessary Evil

@Iceman, I not only like tree climbing, I kind of like Brigadoon. And yet....
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William B
Mon, Dec 10, 2018, 3:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

@Elliott, ohhhhhh, right. Well, shipping is a huge part of a lot of fandom, and I just sort of forget about that with Voyager because while I actually do kind of dig the planetside stuff in Resolutions (and I prefer them to Seven/Chakotay, ha), Janeway/Chakotay wasn't ever much of a focus for me. I sort of forget that there's all that J/C interaction in Coda at the beginning. I like Muse a lot too and am always a bit surprised that it's sometimes dismissed. (I think I remember quickly perusing the IMDb episode ratings one time and Muse was *very* low.)

I am fond of Dark Frontier, too, though for some reason the premise of the Fort Knox mission is hard for me to get past, even though I kind of see what they were going for.

---

(You know, I'm going to take a guess that Peter wasn't actually saying that he thought that the DS9 cast was weaker than Voyager's cast.)
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William B
Mon, Dec 10, 2018, 2:53pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

@Elliott, I can see Dark Frontier (and I really liked the Seven stuff therein), but I didn't know that The Cloud or (especially) Coda were episodes a lot of fans really valued.
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William B
Mon, Dec 10, 2018, 12:36pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Heart of Stone

Though IDK, even in The Nagus it doesn't so much seem that Rom is that dumb. The weirder thing to reconcile between The Nagus and later episodes is that Rom is willing to (or at least is trying to be willing to) kill his brother to get ahead. I think even in The Nagus, it plays out a bit that Rom is trying to playact the ruthless Ferengi he thinks he's supposed to be (and has lots of understandable suppressed anger at Quark), but it was still jarring for me when I first saw it (having first seen that episode after I'd already watched some later episodes) and is still a little jarring now.
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William B
Mon, Dec 10, 2018, 12:33pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Necessary Evil

I don't think it's a major spoiler to say that Meridian is coming up soon, and it's absolutely not surprising that Meridian would turn a potential viewer off bigtime.
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William B
Sat, Dec 8, 2018, 12:49pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

@Springy, well, to be fair, I and others responded, so elaborating more was fair game on your part. (Of course, with Elaine, too many people know the combination to that vault -- peach schnapps.) (And as I suggested before, I agree, especially about B'Elanna FWIW.)
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William B
Fri, Dec 7, 2018, 3:33pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

I should add -- I wasn't really trying to say, with my Voyager-deals-with-adult-topics thing, that the other shows *don't*. And as I've said, I do still mostly like DS9 better than Voyager, so, don't really take any of what I said as an indication that Voyager is "better" than DS9 (or TOS or TNG). It's more that I do actually, underneath it, often like the show, and there are big aspects I actually liked much more when I rewatched it as an adult than when I watched it as a teenager. (There are also eps I liked less.)
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William B
Fri, Dec 7, 2018, 3:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

I guess I'd say that my experience is a bit different from Peter's. The thing is, I did really enjoy DS9 when I was a teenager/young adult, and still enjoy it, but I'd say that it's diminished a little in my eyes since then. A lot of the long-term arcs don't seem to me to hold together as well, some of the character stories don't really gel. I definitely would say that its pleasures are more geared toward complexity, but I think in spite of (or because of) its high ambitions it doesn't always succeed. I feel like it would take some time (and future episodes) to get into it. I still like it a lot -- well, I love it! -- but I feel like there are enough (IMO) botched or dropped plots that I noticed more recently than I did when I was younger, when I think I was more awed by the fact that the show did manage to have over character and story arcs, go to darker and more complex places, etc. And to be clear, I do love DS9 and it has some of my favourite character arcs, episodes, stories in Trek.

Voyager I actually didn't particularly like as a teenager. To be honest, I appreciated it more watching it recently. I think that some of the appreciation is simply by accepting it for what it was -- that it had relatively little overt continuity, that some of its characters were to some extent dead ends, that it was somewhat constricted by formulas from episode to episode, and so on. I feel like Seven of Nine is a great place to start talking about Voyager's strengths and weaknesses. IMO, she is absolutely wonderfully performed and is generally well-written. Some of the same notes as are hit with Data and other characters are hit with her, but for the most part there is a strong underlying internal coherence in her character, which admittedly (IMO) starts to lose structural integrity close to the series' end. She's also put in that stupid ratings-stunt outfit to appeal to the lowest common denominator and to emphasize her, er, superficial attractive qualities, so much so that it is often genuinely distracting from what is more interesting about the character. It takes a bit of effort to get past the surface superficiality to get to the depth, and it's sometimes distracting because the show is actually pretty overt about the somewhat tacky superficial qualities. But I don't know that the depth isn't there. Now, given comments by people like Ron Moore, it might be that even the writers were not really in tune with this potential depth, in which case it's possible it either arose semi-organically from week to week or was genuinely partly constructed by me (and my wife, and other people who enjoy it) watching the show. It's sort of hard to say. Mostly though I think that the show was often ambitious in its characterization, more than it's given credit for, and in particular stories surrounding Janeway, Seven, B'Elanna and the Doctor deal with trauma, depression, loss of identity, self-hatred and other not-for-kiddies stuff, but with a deceptively light touch. I don't know that the writing was entirely consistent on these points, but they hit some of these notes often enough that I'd say they're intentional. I honestly go back and forth on how successful it is on these points. I'd say as an adult I think it was more successful than I did when I was younger, oddly.

I guess what I'm saying is that I think that a lot about Voyager's self-presentation maybe makes it read as shallower than it is -- or, at least, than it sometimes is. I think that my ability to appreciate it this latest rewatch is partly because I *did* know that it was never going to consistently be exactly the show I fully wanted it to be, but that also made it easier to appreciate the times when it really was that show. For random examples of episodes that mean a lot to me: Meld, Latent Image, Lineage, Living Witness, the Seven material in Dark Frontier even if I'm not sold on the whole episode, Counterpoint, Timeless, Pathfinder, Prey, The Year of Hell.... I don't really want to harp on it especially because I know there are lots of problems people have with many of those episodes, but what those episodes are, on some level, "about" are generally things like isolation, guilt, breakdown of trust, difficulties with emotional containment, the impossible task of moving forward in one's life when it's already apparently permanently broken.... For all its flaws, and it has a lot, Voyager does actually seem to me to be engaging with the Trek tradition of addressing big ideas, and it tends to do so from an emotional perspective (though not wholly without intellectual weight), and as such is sometimes, to me, pretty moving. And I don't know. There's one ep in that list in particular that I liked when I was younger but I "get it" on a bone-deep level now that I'm older, in a way that I don't really even want to talk about too directly because it's personal. So your mileage may vary.
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William B
Fri, Dec 7, 2018, 1:57pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Crossover

@Springy: while overall I prefer DS9 to Voyager, I do also find myself thinking that the quality difference is not as great as most commenters here (and Jammer himself) argues. Going forward, there are some big problems I have with DS9, while it also boasts some of my favourite things in Trek.

For what it's worth, my impression (from talking to people IRL, lots of things I've read online) is that this is not unique to this site, and indeed may even reflect some of the behind-the-scenes stuff. There's a famous Ron Moore interview when he moved from DS9 to Voyager and he trashed Voyager. There are some interviews where the writers who went from TNG to DS9 really indicated they felt like they were doing better work on DS9.

On the other hand, I *also* had the impression from talking to people IRL that a lot of people gave up on DS9 very early or dismissed it, and that it was less watched than TNG (for sure) and Voyager (maybe). DS9 I think had worse ratings. So I think that there's also some underdog feeling, that DS9 was a little underground. To some extent I think that the feeling on this site anyway that Voyager is the underdog is maybe part of why it seems to me that it's being "reassessed" a little.

As I said, I like DS9 a lot, but I think that its reputation is somewhat inflated. Sometimes I find the behind-the-scenes indications of writerly dissatisfaction with the TNG days a little sad, because I love TNG and don't like the idea that the writers felt straitjacketed by it.
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William B
Thu, Dec 6, 2018, 1:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Outrageous Okona

The episode gives over a LOT of its running time to Okona and Joe freaking Piscopo and basically all of that is wasted, so, I mean, yes.

I agree, though, that Whoopi is *so good*, and I'd argue that the moments between her and Data kind of work for me because of the strength of those two performers even if the "Data learns humour" plot is botched by the bizarre writing (and performances from Piscopo) choices.

I also like the moment you mention with the lasers and where Riker adds, that he feels like they're in Lilliput.

The episode does, I guess I'm saying, have some things going for it, and so I'd put it above Code of Honour anyway. Maybe not Shades of Grey.
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William B
Thu, Dec 6, 2018, 12:21pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Outrageous Okona

I wouldn't necessarily argue it's *not* a terrible pun, but I give a little leeway that referring to humanoids as "noids" is a little more common in a society where there are sentient non-humanoids they sometimes communicate with (i.e. Data).
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William B
Wed, Dec 5, 2018, 6:37pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Our Man Bashir

"Maybe, but I still find this methodology way out of character. In "The Wire," Garak could have sent Bashir to Tain directly, being his ultimate goal. But instead, he manipulated Bashir into getting him what he wanted through careful obfuscation and misdirection. I can see Garak trying something similar here, trying to lead Bashir to a pessimistic conclusion by the nose, but instead he just kind of blurts out his objection to the whole premise. I really do think the characterisation for Garak stopped at "he's a spy.""

Good point. As I indicated, I'm not exactly sold on the interpretation I put forward, I'm just thinking aloud (well, in writing) of ways it could maybe sort of work.

We *could*, for example, maybe argue that Garak's experience in IC/TDIC has made Garak more open and has made him realize the error of being too closed up................but I don't really buy it, because the tone still feels off for Garak to be so blatant the whole story through, from when it was just a fun lark of Bashir's to when it was deadly serious. Robinson is great of course and tries to make it make emotional sense and the Robinson-Siddig chemistry is still there.
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William B
Wed, Dec 5, 2018, 12:54pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Our Man Bashir

Last point (for now): Garak insisting on ending the program and saving himself and Bashir -- for Bashir's own good -- is a lot like Odo punching Garak out to drag him away from the exploding fleet in The Die is Cast. Garak is in a sense repeating not just a generic lesson from his OO days but a specific one tied to a massive tragedy we've witnessed. So maybe for Garak to believe that he's doing Bashir a real favour by saving him from going down with his five crew members makes some sense considering that Garak himself had to be knocked out to be dragged away from thousands of his people not long ago. Garak's bad experiences have warped his view of every scenario for him to be more pessimistic than is warranted.
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William B
Wed, Dec 5, 2018, 12:44pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Our Man Bashir

This actually takes me to the next point about Bashir: Bashir *does* manage it, through his resourcefulness, intellect, humour and wit. It's partly that Bashir is operating in a fantasy, with different rules than reality, but those things are something that Garak himself possesses, and something that can help someone deal with real life challenges.

SPOILER

But we also know, as I've alluded, in retrospect, that Bashir's skill at keeping all the plates spinning is partly because he's genetically engineered. And this raises an interesting question about Bashir and what he says about Federation idealism. What if it's possible to do the impossible and save the day with minimal pragmatic sacrifice -- but it requires being superhuman? I think this is the reason he is so frequently paired with O'Brien, and why O'Brien is so central to Bashir's arc in the series, and survival -- Miles is very clever and brave and resourceful, but is also very clearly *human* and not super-.
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William B
Wed, Dec 5, 2018, 12:41pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Our Man Bashir

To expand a little on some of the points Elliott, Chrome and Peter were making (and what I said back in the day, lol) I think it's worth considering this episode at least partly as Bashir's fantasy about himself. In "real life" Bashir is still not all that suave or charming. He is utterly brilliant, but he's not really able to manage the complex social world without fumbling. Not only that, but there's no particular reason to expect him to have all that much physical bravery or -- you know -- ability to shoot with much precision. I mean, he can't even beat O'Brien at darts, right?

SPOILER

Of course, we know that Bashir could beat O'Brien at darts, once we take into account later revelations. And that is maybe part of the fun of the Bond persona -- is that Bashir can hit people with a cork or shoot Garak in the face without killing him, and it can sort of work as if it's part of the fantasy while subtly revealing that Bashir actually *is* that skilled, but on some level has to hide it all the time.

Really, everyone Bashir knows besides Dax is not really scientifically learned enough to be able to realize just *how* brilliant he is medically, and everyone Bashir knows besides Garak is not really cunning in a particular way enough to spot the wheels within wheels turning in his brain and how difficult that actually is to manage. However, even Dax and Garak tend to underestimate him, because Bashir is sort of living a constant lie, a double agent if you will, regarding his Big Secret of Doctor Bashir, I Presume.

END SPOILER

But anyway, what we do have then is that Bashir basically *does* live out his fantasy through the holodeck, and that is, in part, to woo the exotic foreign woman (Kira) and kiss the nerdy scientist girl (Jadzia) while maintaining the emotional upper hand, to best the men in his life whom he finds somewhat imposing, even his friends like Miles. And he also gets to play Garak's life *like a game* and play it as a game that Bashir can win. This ties in a bit with what Elliott underlined when talking about The Wire -- Bashir is actually a little smug when Garak's scheming bites him in the ass, because as much fun as he has in those conversations with Garak, it gets kind of exhausting to always be the naive pupil to Garak's wise master. I mean, look: where exactly have Federation philosophy and Cardassian philosophy *gotten* their respective societies, and why is it that Bashir should always be deferential to Garak, as a result?

I think this is also part of why Bashir needs to keep his program a secret. OK, so he didn't actually put in Dax for Honey Bear etc. until the transporter accident. But is it also possible that on some level that *is* how he sees his friends and coworkers? That on some level he would have been imagining the exotic foreign beauty as his beautiful and terrifying alien CO, his hulking nemesis as his best friend and frequent sports adversary who seems to often have the upper hand, the quiet demure but beautiful scientist as his...well, party-girl full-of-life beautiful scientist friend, but one who used to present as quiet back in season 1. Navigating this world filled with colourful characters is difficult and Bashir, not unlike Barclay in Hollow Pursuits, is sort of entering the holodeck to practice. And he's also playing a game where he gets to do something as dangerous and challenging as what Garak did.

On that level, Garak's antagonism makes sense. And I think Garak's *annoyance* that Bashir is playing a game version of Garak's tragic life story is fully justified and understandable. But I think it doesn't really make literal sense for Garak to let his personal annoyance continue once it becomes clear that Sisko et al. are in danger. *However*, I think that it's more a writing...misapplication, I guess, than mistake. Garak's point that they can't save *all* the main cast and that they will have to pick and choose is not unreasonable. In that sense, I think Garak's insistence that they should cut their losses should maybe have either happened at a moment when the danger to their lives was more actively greater, or should have taken the form of Garak insisting they needed to kill (or at least fail to save) one of the crew members to save the others. I think the situation seemed bad, but it didn't quite play to me like it was dire enough that it was time for them to cut their losses for their own survival, yet.

But there is another possibility lurking into it, that I've just considered: Garak is not a coward, and while I don't imagine he would definitely give his life up for the DS9 crew, I think he'd be willing to take a few chances with it to save them. But what if Garak is unwilling to let *Julian* die? What if Garak -- who has just lost Tain, who has seen his own life destroyed -- is not only trying to convince Bashir that Bashir is wrong about what it means to be a spy, but that he's actively trying to scare Bashir *away* from the spy life, because he's sure that that world would eat Bashir up and *kill* him, and Garak cares about Julian too much to bear seeing that? I think Garak would sacrifice Bashir to save Cardassia, if it came to that, but I also think that Garak probably would be willing to sacrifice Sisko, Dax, Kira, O'Brien and Worf to save Bashir, especially if doing so taught Bashir a lifelong, permanent lesson that this life Bashir apparently idealizes -- and the life that Garak himself stoked interest in, in Bashir! -- is not for him, and he should stay safe rather than let it kill him, the way it killed the entire Obsidian Order.

I'm not going to go to bat for the episode far enough to say that this is what was intended. This is just some speculation. Garak clearly wants to impart a lesson onto Bashir, but it's possible that the lesson is less "You should be more heartless" as "You should let me be heartless for you, and realize that you have a heart, and so should stay away from this business, because this business *will kill you*."
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William B
Mon, Dec 3, 2018, 3:41pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Whispers

"I think the constant coffee ordering was just to make duplicate O'Brien say "double" over and over. I mean, O'Brien is strong and sweet and doubled, too. The talking to himself, which suggests two O'Briens, was definitely a clue."

That's great! Though I wouldn't describe either O'Brien as "Jamaican blend"....
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William B
Mon, Dec 3, 2018, 2:48pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Armageddon Game

@Springy,

I like Keiko and don't really feel down on her the way others do.

It's a good point about Keiko & the coffee reveal at the end being on theme. I guess I sort of still felt it was a bit -- I don't know. A bit jokey at the expense of the kind of sweet idea that Keiko *did* know something specific about Miles that saved his life. I guess we can still say that Keiko knew she had to try everything to save Miles and so seized on something that was not actually true, even if the spirit underlying it (her love of, and knowledge about, Miles) was true.
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William B
Sat, Dec 1, 2018, 2:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Cardassians

@Springy,

"We're disagreeing on whether Sisko handled THIS situation correctly (I think). I'm not even saying he made the wrong decision. I'm saying it was he made it without enough investigation, care, and consideration. I can't really tell if he made the right decision."

I'd even say that it's possible Sisko did do this -- but that we're not shown it, and nor are we really given enough information on what his thought process was.

It is possible, for example, that the episode is taking the perspective that Peter took -- that once it was revealed Rugal was not left by accident or negligence but due to malicious intent on Dukat's part, that was it and Sisko didn't consider any other factors. However, I never got that impression watching this episode.

I never really got a clear sense of what Sisko's thought process was. I don't blame Sisko the character for this, because I don't think there's evidence that he definitely *didn't* consider what was best for Rugal, but I blame the episode for (IMHO) neglecting this aspect of the story once it gets into the political maneuvering stuff with Bashir, Garak, and Dukat (which is effective, well acted etc. but overshadows Rugal's story, which should have remained more central IMO).
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William B
Fri, Nov 30, 2018, 3:25pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: Cardassians

That Rugal was kidnapped by Dukat (and/or his cronies) as a child is relevant but it's not the only thing going on here. The scenario Jason is describing is completely different from what happens here. The Bajoran foster parents had zero responsibility for the kidnapping, nor did they have any idea it happened, so the analogy of kidnapping a baby and raising it oneself falls apart there -- because in that analogy, the current parent was a participant in the original crime, rather than another innocent who was duped.

"But again, the reason the ending isn't about the best foster situation isn't because it chooses not to focus on that: it's because it turns out that the foster care situation turns out to have actually been a result of kidnapping. In the case of kidnapping there is simply no question about deciding what's best for anyone: the child should go back to its rightful home."

The foster parents have zero responsibility for the kidnapping and the child is already more than halfway to adulthood. More than that, not only will he be removed from his foster parents but his entire *planet* in sending him back to his birth parents, and in particular will now have to go live with someone who participated in the brutal occupation and destruction of the planet he calls home.

"If you open up a discussion about 'what would be best' for a kidnapped child it would open up the possibility of arguing that children should be taken away from their rightful parents if they can be given a "better" situation elsewhere. And I think you could imaging where that argument might lead."

One can acknowledge that a wrong has been done without requiring that all discussions about what would be best to deal with the wrongs must be off the table. The political realities of this specific situation are complicated and prosecuting Dukat is largely off the table. But if there were another situation where someone kidnapped a child and then dropped said child off into foster care, where the foster parents remained ignorant for decades, it's obvious that the kidnapper has committed a crime and should be charged, but I don't think that this would negate the reality that the child's welfare needs to be determined and that there are claims by both the birth parent and the person who raised the child for the child's entire life.

More to the point though, Dukat took advantage of Cardassia's withdrawal from its brutal Occupation of Bajor in order to commit another atrocity to harm a political rival. This is totally not representative of an "ordinary" situation where someone kidnaps a child, but is more in line with what happens in extreme international conflicts involving war. That the prefect of the Occupation kidnapped the child to harm his political rival doesn't make it *less* about the thorny issues involving responsibility for children in the wake of catastrophe, but more. I'm not saying the kidnapping is irrelevant to the situation but I really disagree the idea that "what is best for the child" should not be even considered because the child's fate was determined by a criminal and immoral act by a malevolent third party.
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William B
Wed, Nov 21, 2018, 1:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Amok Time

Thanks, you guys.
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William B
Wed, Nov 21, 2018, 12:01pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Seventh Season Recap

@Springy, it's been good to read your comments on Voyager.

I was overall sort of mixed but overall enjoyed Voyager when I rewatched it last year or so (which I hope came across in my comments, even if they often skewed negative because I sometimes found it easier to talk about what didn't work for me than what did). I'd say I liked it better than when I watched it as a teenager, I think because I sort of knew what flaws to expect (some of the characters don't really get much development, especially Kim and Chakotay, some episodes are particularly bad, especially things like Threshold and Spirit Folk) and didn't let them bother me that much, generally. I also had a better chance to appreciate how good Melgrew was in the role. While I recognized how great Picardo and Ryan were when I was younger, Melgrew (and to a degree Russ, whose unshowy perfection I took for granted) flew under my radar.
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