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Walrus1701D
Mon, Apr 13, 2020, 9:07am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Repression

You can see Tuvok's left hand as he comes at the frightened crew member in the Jeffries Tube...
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Apr 13, 2020, 8:34am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Equinox, Part II

This episode bugs the hell out of me. Ransom's betrayal reduces Janeway to basically committing premediated murder, and I'm sorry, but that's unforgivable and it should have seriously damaged Chakotay's trust in her from this point on (not to mention the rest of the senior staff who barely go along with her reckless decisions after she relieves her first officer). She admits that Chakotay "might've" had good reason to stage his own mutiny, and then the episode ends a minute later. Janeway's actions completely compromise her character and ability to command. If this is how far the writers were willing to stretch her, then the only plausible conclusion would be to have Janeway remove herself from command until she got her mind right. Someone who has been built up with such a moral compass would see the error of her ways and be responsible enough to own up to it. I can damn well guarantee that the Doctor would not find her fit to command after this. It took her months to come anywhere near to being this reckless in "Year of Hell," and the Doc rightfully chose to relieve her. But of course, in Voyager, there are no lasting consequences for anything, unless you're Tom Paris.
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Walrus1701D
Sun, Apr 5, 2020, 2:52am (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: Et in Arcadia Ego, Part 2

I was surprised that during Picard's death scene, I felt absolutely nothing. The acting in it was fine and the passing of this iconic character that I'd loved for nearly three decades was certainly a big deal, but again...nothing. I eventually realized that I wasn't reacting because I knew that one way or another, Picard was coming back. The damn show bore his name, and Patrick Stewart would not have gone to extravagant lengths to invite his dear friend, Whoopi Goldberg, to guest star during the series' second season with knowledge that he wouldn't be in it. As for the characters mourning his loss, I honestly don't know any of them well enough to empathize with their pain. I have a sneaking suspicion, though, that the end of the series, whenever that may be, will show "Picard's" death. Then, I definitely will shed a tear.
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Mar 16, 2020, 9:30am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Preemptive Strike

This is rare TNG episode that takes a page directly out of DS9's shades of gray handbook. It's shocking to see Starfleet take such a militaristic stance on the Maquis issue, planning to neutralize them with a fleet of starships. I'm also wondering if the Cardassians were actually developing biogenic weapons. They were painted as the clear villains throughout this extended plot line, so it wouldn't surprise me.

So much conflict and intrigue are developed across two series in a short amount of time. It's a damn shame they fell by the wayside after the 1993-1994 season. The Maquis plot is all but forgotten on DS9 by the third season, and it's a conflict on Voyager for approximately two episodes.
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Mar 16, 2020, 9:17am (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: Nepenthe

A friend of mine, after we both watched the early-TNG episode, "Conspiracy," said it would be crazy if the parasitic creatures in that episode were behind the evil plot in this series. While it is off-putting that TNG never followed up on an adversary that was clearly set up to be an ongoing threat, I immediately tried to curtail his excitement. Such an outcome would cheapen the entire story of this new show based on character development and complex themes. Those pink,spiny-gilled, stop-motion creatures can stay dead for all I care.
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 10:30pm (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: Nepenthe

I would say that the writers of Star Trek Picard have dared to write him the way he *should have* been written on TNG. I admit, that's not objective and maybe not keeping with spirit and legacy of the character, but I don't mind seeing a Picard that is slightly more human. It adds depth and intrigue. Picard can be a little arrogant and still be a great and noble person. It was probably arrogant of him to think that he could almost single-handedly resettle all of the Romulan refugees, and that may have been what Riker was talking about.

I like this healthy debate, but don't misunderstand - I still consider Picard to be the best captain of all the series, and Patrick Stewart is the finest actor in the history of the franchise. This show is such an amazing gift for all of us long-time Trekkers. :-)
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 4:04pm (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: Nepenthe

First, I must address the criticism of Riker's line about Picard's arrogance. Having been a dedicated follower of Deep Space Nine over the past five years (better late than never), I have come to view TNG in a new and not necessarily favorable light. I now realize that Next Generation had a slight air of superiority that permeated its scripts and the cast's performances. Gene Roddenberry created a Starfleet that was never wrong, and one- or two-note villains throughout the series reinforced that stance. It's hard to see Picard now simply as a man with no flaws who was above it all. If he's not, then arrogance is the natural by-product.

I was thrilled to hear Riker call Picard out like that. Now that he's retired and has lost a son, not to mention those 10-15 years he spent NOT being Picard's first officer, he's hardened and no longer blinded by his man crush.

note: I know this was already mentioned, but I love that Riker and Troi named their daughter Kestra. The writers knew that only the hardcore Next Generation fans would get that reference from a lesser-known episode of the series. It also makes perfect sense, and I would not be surprised if they purposely cast a blonde actress as a further nod to "Dark Page."
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 10:02am (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: Nepenthe

I was just so bloody giddy to see Riker and Troi that I can't even judge the quality of this episode. #fanboyproblems
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Walrus1701D
Thu, Mar 5, 2020, 7:25am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Conspiracy

When this episode first aired, I was only 5 and I only saw the last five minutes (how did it not give me nightmares??). At the time, I thought I was watching an episode of the Original Series, though given my young age and the quality of Season 1, can you really blame me?
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Walrus1701D
Tue, Mar 3, 2020, 9:34am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part II

Arguments could be and have been made about how Kirk and even Sisko are more badass than Picard. I use this episode as a rebuttal every time. Yes, Picard is broken at the end, but the defiance he shows to Madred over and over again are beyond courageous. The scene before he's broken, he spouts his strongest indictment of his tormentor - "It doesn't matter what you do to me because you're insignificant." The cahones on that guy!!
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Walrus1701D
Thu, Feb 20, 2020, 10:29am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Contagion

The writers were still being sloppy about who controlled what at this point, as Riker barked at Wesley about raising the shields when such a command is not available on the navigation panel.
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Walrus1701D
Thu, Feb 20, 2020, 8:44am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: Deja Q

I love the journey taken by Q in this episode, even if it is rendered meaningless by the end when he's given back his powers. His condescending one-liners and continual mocking of the Enterprise crew through the first two-thirds of the episode make total sense. He's always considered humans beneath him. But a deep and wonderful transformation takes place in the last third. He's a broken man and while that has not caused anyone around him to lose their contempt for him, his pain is palpable and understandable.

Throughout the series, John de Lancie always handled both comedy and drama brilliantly, but this stands out as unique among all his other performances. The comedy is self-defeating and somewhat tragic, while the drama is much more personal than Q's usual menacing, grandiose characterizations.

In a story sense, it's unusual that Q suddenly has no security detail when he confesses to Picard in the Ready Room, nor when he talks to a recovering Data in Sickbay, but from a dramatic sense, these two scenes need a one-on-one dynamic, and of course, de Lancie pulls off both scenes flawlessly. This Q is more interesting and three-dimensional than he is in any other episode (including his appearances on DS9 and Voyager). Bravo to de Lancie and the writers!
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Walrus1701D
Wed, Feb 12, 2020, 11:08am (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: The End Is the Beginning

I can't help but wonder when we'll see Seven of Nine. The snippet of her we saw in the trailer seemed to take place back at Picard's home in France, so unless she's also a dream image, she won't show up until after Picard's mission. I can't wait to see how much more human she's become. It's now been 20 years since the removal of her cortical node. With any luck, it's also been that long since her and Chakotay realized that their pairing made no sense and broke up. ;-)
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Walrus1701D
Tue, Feb 11, 2020, 3:25pm (UTC -5)
Re: PIC S1: Maps and Legends

This show is sucking me in with its intrigue! Referring back to the statement about the Romulans' banning of anything related to AI, the writers obviously forgot about Admiral Jarok's comment to Data way back in TNG's third season that he knew a whole host of Romulan cyberneticists that would love to study him. That's fine, though. It's a little, 10-second exchange that most fans probably don't even remember. :-D
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Walrus1701D
Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 8:31am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: The Wire

I believe Garak actually did reveal why he was exiled from Cardassia in this episode. Though he told three different stories to Dr. Bashir, one of them rings much more true than the others, even after Tain revealed that Garak completely made up his friend, Elim, who is mentioned in all three stories. From a writing standpoint, however, we can assume that everytime he mentioned Elim, he was really talking about himself, or his conscience.

So if we remove that and just focus on the events in the stories, which one sounds the most true? We find out in "Improbable Cause" that Tain was directly responsible for Garak's exile. He accuses Garak of betraying him, to which Garak responds with a rare outburst of emotion: "I never betrayed you! At least…not in my heart." From this, we can infer that Garak regrets his traitorous actions. Looking back at the stories he tells Bashir, the first and third stories can be easily shot down because neither of them involve him betraying Tain. The second story can't be dismissed so quickly. He explains that he set free a group of Bajoran children that he was ordered to interrogate, and then send to execution. This obviously went against the practices of the Cardassian occupation of Bajor. I believe it was an offense severe enough to cause Garak's banishment. There's also the fact that when he tells the second story, Garak is in the middle of a severe narcotic withdrawal. I'm not sure if he was in a clear enough state to conjure up a completely fabricated story. He obviously remembered to name the false Elim, but I believe that was the extent of his trickery.

We also see in "The Die Is Cast" that Garak is no longer an effective interrogator because he breaks during his torturous session with Odo before Odo does. It's not out-side the realm of possibility that he took pity on those Bajoran children. His personal feelings toward the Bajorans throughout the series are at worst, shown as neutral. Garak is obviously one of the most complex characters in the entire Star Trek franchise, and he never peels back all of his layers, but I believe the reason for his exile is a layer he did reveal.
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Walrus1701D
Wed, Jul 17, 2019, 10:00am (UTC -5)
Re: Vote to Rename Voyager

Star Trek: Sparks Fly
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Walrus1701D
Mon, May 6, 2019, 1:46pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Move Along Home

Quark's groveling scene was Armin Shimmerman's worst acting moment of the entire series. It was so over-the-top horrible, it made me want to stab a tribble in the...uh...reproductive sack?
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Walrus1701D
Wed, Nov 21, 2018, 11:04am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Extreme Measures

I foolishly stopped watching Deep Space Nine in the 3rd season because I found it too boring, compared to Next Generation and then Voyager. Go easy on me, I was only 12 at the time.

Flash forward four years - a friend of mine and fellow Trekker all but begged me to tune into the last several episodes of the show because he said the war arc was incredible. I had also lost my interest in Voyager by this time, so my distracted mind did not follow his request until this episode, sadly.

Given the weak, buddy-comedy dialogue alone in "Extreme Measures," it convinced me of the delusion that I had made the right choice to discard DS9, and I didn't bother to watch the remaining two episodes. It didn't help that I was ignorant of Section 31 and Sloan. This episode was just a mess and pales in comparison to every other one in the final arc. It's a shame it took me 15 years to give DS9 another chance, but better late then never!
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Walrus1701D
Tue, Nov 13, 2018, 11:38am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Image in the Sand

A little note on Kira's new hairstyle. I've seen various comments on the Interwebs about this insignificant change, but while watching "Wrongs Darker Than Death or Night" from the sixth season, it dawned on me that perhaps the production staff or Nana Visitor chose this new, unique look (with Kira's longer hair covering only the left side of her face) as an homage to Kira's mother. As you may recall, Meru used her hair to conceal a scar on her face. Kira's feelings about her mother became quite complicated after her orb experience, but it's possible she decided to honor her in some small way. Or it could just be a coincidence. Any thoughts?
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Nov 5, 2018, 11:24am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: In the Cards

This is an entertaining episode, and it's great to see how much Jake and Nog have matured as characters since their mostly forgettable turns in seasons 1 and 2. The show is not without its weaknesses. The brooding of the rest of the main cast rings false for me. Bashir's drastic change in tone was particularly off-putting. It's like Siddig said to himself, "The script says Bashir is sad, so I should be sad now." Nog's stealing of Bashir's teddy bear literally out of arms of a sleeping Leeta was funny, but played like a cartoon. Minor gripes, though.

In a more general sense, having Nog go to Starfleet Academy was about the best thing the show could've done with the character. Unlike Rom and virtually every other Ferengi, Nog became more likable as the series progressed.
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Nov 5, 2018, 10:58am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Blaze of Glory

Of course, Sisko's "It's easy to be a saint in paradise" speech back in the second season showed that he already understood the plight of the Maquis. The character conveniently forgets that when he's betrayed by Cal Hudson, and then Eddington. I'm not sure I like Sisko taking those betrayals so personally. Would he really ascend to the rank of captain by being such a hothead? At least he makes up for that somewhat here by swallowing his pride enough to ask for Eddington's help. Great episode.
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Walrus1701D
Mon, Nov 5, 2018, 10:46am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Children of Time

This episode reminds us that Odo lives by a different moral code than the other officers, and his quiet response to Kira at the end - not at all shaken by her emotion rage - I think foreshadows his betrayal in "Behind the Lines". Yes, he betrays Kira in that episode, but it goes along with his acceptance here that the needs of the many don't matter in the grand scheme. That's not right to anyone else, but it's right to Odo.
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Walrus1701D
Tue, Oct 23, 2018, 11:40am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: For the Cause

One gaping plot hole here - where the hell is Dax?! She's not shown on the station or the Defiant during the hijacking. Eddington would have to knock her out, too, but we don't see that. Shoddy writing...
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Walrus1701D
Fri, Oct 5, 2018, 9:40am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: The Die Is Cast

Wow! I watched Deep Space Nine when Next Generation was still on. The two aired back-to-back on Saturday night. But the intricate characterizations and political overtones went over my head, and I just couldn't get into it. By the time Voyager premiered and it somewhat replaced the starship-sized hole left by TNG (not to mention airing on a different night), I stopped watching DS9 completely.

When I finally gave the show the chance I always promised my fellow Trekker friend I would four years ago, I had no idea this riveting, explosive sequence of events even existed. This is, without a doubt, the best two-part episode of DS9 and the second-best two-parter of the entire franchise behind "The Best of Both Worlds." Odo and Garak are my favorite characters of the series. They're so expertly written and performed, and in these two episodes, the plot matches the characters in depth and intrigue.

I must say, however, that "The Die Is Cast" does suffer from the same stumblings as most two-part conclusions. Sisko and the others deciding to risk their lives and careers to save one officer makes no sense, neither does the fact that they face no consequences upon their return. The torture scene and the final battle make up for it, but I'd say this deserves three stars, not four.
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Walrus1701D
Fri, Aug 31, 2018, 9:14am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Schisms

I saw this episode when it first aired, but I didn't hear most of it. I was very afraid of thunder as a child (still am to a certain degree), so I held my ears closed to block out the sound. In retrospect, thunder was the perfect background to such a wonderfully creepy episode.
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