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Val
Wed, Dec 25, 2019, 12:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Sacrifice of Angels

Loved this episode. Played the battlescenes over and over. I was so engrossed in the seeming futility of the Federation battle that I had absolutely forgotten about the Klingons. Boy! Did my heart leap at the announcement they had arrived! Dukat going mad was perfectly fine and totally believable...a man with his years of effort and ambition and
lying self image finally confronted with the futility of his obsession with bajor? I loved the Prophet ending...I was so struck by Sisko's realization of just how inexplicably important he was to the Prophets...And he finally realized that importance and was willing to blackmail and manipulate them to do HIS will. Excellent. The Ferenghi were all great., Talk about the insidious influence of root beer on them!

But am I the only one who was frustrated at Kira's compulsive babbling and questioning of Rom when he's trying to disable the mind destruction? Geemaneezie! It's her damn fault he failed. I am not a fan of the Kira character at all...totally devoid of awareness of her impact on others.

As for the Odo redemption...I just always assumed those sessions with the Founder were designed to manipulate and control him, with an added nuance of Founder jealousy of his attachment to Kira. The shock of Kira's imminent death broke that control. We have seen before that the Founders were adept at manipulation, e.g., The Gowron Martok changling deception. I do wish this had been gone into much more.
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Valan
Mon, Nov 11, 2019, 9:40am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Endgame

The discourse is much enriched.
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Val
Thu, Jul 25, 2019, 3:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Worst Case Scenario

I have been really enjoying rewatching VOY episodes (and seeing some for the first time) after so many years and then coming here to read all the comments to see how people's perceptions of the episodes may have changed over time.

I thought this episode was a lot of fun. I was surprised how many comments I read through before seeing someone mention that hilarious line about not stopping to examine every pointless anomaly - - this epi was sooo meta and a sly wink to many fan criticisms. It felt like the actors really enjoyed doing this episode as well, there was some extra deliciously sarcastic flair from all the main cast.

I really liked Skeptical's ideas for changing up the plot. Removing the IMMINENT DEATH aspect really would solve so many of the implausible elements. That Seska might tinker with the program just to mess with Tuvok makes more sense than trying to kill him--even removing a few failsafes to freak them out works, but ultimately they'd find a way to escape without outside intervention. As others have noted, it would have been a perfectly fun character study within the hologram limitations, no need to go to extremes that strain credulity. I was howling over Skeppy's query about who was directing the hologram episode Janeway was viewing onscreen.

All that said, still an entertaining lark of an episode and I enjoyed the character interactions, humor, and meta elements immensely.
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Valkyyr
Wed, Jan 23, 2019, 9:35am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Precious Cargo

The episode was as awful as the intro song. It has taken me this long to finally get into the series, and it has only been because it is now available on Netflix which allows me to skip the intro.
The show itself has been a pleasant surprise for the most part, and I think they have done reasonably well to reconcile obvious technological disparities between actual production time, setting time and existing storylines.
To have produced such a contrived episode, with cliched writing and forced acting like this (and a song that let's be honest, sounds like it was written by Matt Stone and Trey Parker as a piss-take) makes it seem like it was left in the hands of the angsty, eye-rolling teenaged hipster offspring who owns some merchandise, but, you know, ironically.
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Valysu
Thu, Dec 20, 2018, 9:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: I, Mudd

@JASmius

I think that's what a lot of people are missing from this and the fact that those androids are not people, they are a hive mind. They have no sex but the one we choose for the bodies, even then, they lack reproductive and so on. So people viewing these things as anything other than things are already incorrect.

Secondly, yes, this is a pretty insightful episode. You have too look, listen, and understand what was going on. Kirk early on even said, why would anyone want to leave this paradise. Well, it inhibits humans and takes away anything to keep them from going forward. Someone above said that it would've been awesome for Bones and Scotty because they have advanced technology for them to experiment. My question to all of you is, why? You're held captive and everything you want is at your whim. There's really nothing to gain. So no, it's pretty bad.

To go on with that, Mudd is a scummy person. I wouldn't say he's borderline narcissistic and greedy. Even he wanted to leave. There was someone else above me that said he wanted to stay but his whole mission was to get out and have Kirk take his place. Mudd thrives on bamboozling and conning. I'm sure he gets a rush off of it and would become incredibly bored in his predicament if he were to stay. Obviously, with such a sexist guy, he's going to make attractive androids. It's a reflection of that character. Just to kind of repeat myself, they are robots.

It was also a fun episode. Watching them act out everything was great and entertaining. Androids don't understand emotions or acting really so it being really cheesy made it even better. They took a gamble and won. I would've done it if it were me and staying there. I'd rather be exploring space, ya know?

Anyways, it was a great episode regardless of what people thought this episode represented.

3.5/5
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Koval, chairman of the Tal Shiar
Wed, Nov 28, 2018, 3:29am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: General Discussion

Jolan-tru Earthlings, I'm Koval, chairman of the Tal Shiar.
Congrats, one of you discovered (ha-ha) the truth: we produced "Discovery" to tease you, silly Starfleet's fans :-P ... And to "put the last nail on the coffin" of the Federation... Mwahahahahahaha!!! I'm a real veruul

Look how COOL we are, and come aboard the D'deridex warbird named "D'discovery"! Join the Imperial Fleet ]:-)

Jolan-tru
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Patrick Wells Valenti
Sat, Jul 21, 2018, 6:51pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Chimera

I'm watching through for the first time, and this is now my favorite episode I've seen of DS9, possibly of Trek ever. And that ending, wow, really made me tear up.
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Gerry Valenzuela
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 4:43am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S4: Bound

Sexist and passive-aggressive homphobic as well. So much has changed in the past decade. I can't believe that there never was a gay character portrayed in any of the five series that was supposed to depict our shared utopian future. I feel the same way when there is some crime on one of the starshps in the series and that there is no video evidence. Our primitive 7/11s have better criminal surveillance than Starfleet.
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Percivale
Tue, Nov 22, 2011, 10:28am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Lonely Among Us

re: Lonely Among Us

Wow, what a shambles of an episode. I could go on forever. Nothing makes sense; nobody belongs anywhere or should be doing anything they're doing. Just a bunch of stuff thrown together.

Worf saying he doesn't remember having a memory block symbolizes the episode for me.

A big plot hole is why the alien blathers on about its cries for help not being understood by the crew, when it does everything secretly and makes no real effort to just freakin' tell the crew "Hey, I'm an energy being. Get me home." - when it obviously could. Why even bother merging with Picard, if you're only eager to go home? Ugh, too many questions like this.

I guess what angers me the most is something that got better with time but that TNG never really figured out: no one in Star Fleet or the Federation knows how to make responsible, professional decisions about anything. In later episodes, I think maybe the writers just didn't completely understand how to write professional-acting officers, but here it seems like they just don't care. A self-respecting, standards-holding Federation wouldn't consider these aliens for admission in a million years. Also, it seems there really is no protocol for relieving a Captain of duty on medical grounds - he can just shout you down and ignore procedure whenever he wants to. Way to ensure the safety of the crew.

The silver lining is the acting; Patrick and Stewart and Brent Spiner do a good job here - even if Data is acting in a way that I don't think Data should ever have acted (the writers hadn't decided on how to write his character yet).

1/2 Star
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Percivale
Sun, Oct 23, 2011, 3:35pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

I almost disagree with Jammer's star rating here - the refreshingly interesting dialogue and tense plotting of this episode make it deserve four stars. But, unfortunately, the Ferengi bring it down a whole star.

There was really no purpose for them. There was no reason for Kamala to be in the cocoon - they could have made a mysterious request to have her transported to quarters from the beginning. Captain demands that the identity and purpose of all passengers be known to him, there's a conflict with the ambassador, who then informs the Captain who is coming aboard, and there you go.

The beginning actually made me angry - it was another episode where you really can tell the show was written by people who have never worked in positions of authority. You simply require that all cargo be disclosed and lock the doors they go into. No questions need to be asked. You're not being "mean" by doing so.

And the ambassador could have tripped in the holodeck or something.

But back to the substance of the episode. Yeah, great. We see Captain Picard in a situation that truly challenges him, and the tension, the resolution and subsequent tragedy of it packs a real emotional punch.

Also, this is perhaps the closest any tv episode has been to actually convincing me that two people fall in love in a 43 minute tv episode. Kudos.

I forgive them for not going into the ethics of the situation deeper than they could. I was hoping for the second conversation with Dr. Crusher to go a little deeper, but it was helpful in its way - perhaps giving a hint that relationships built on shared experience go deeper than ones based on telepathy.

An interesting way to go into the ethics would have been to do something I find they do not do enough in Star Trek: portray aliens has having different natures than "human" nature (I always cringe when Guinan advocates "human" nature - shouldn't it be "humanoid" or something like that?). Maybe it's not unethical, because she actually does fulfill her role by doing what she does in a way that humans can't entirely relate to. But then again, they can barely be bothered to make the aliens look different from humans, so I guess it goes the same way for the insides. They had to have her learn how to think differently. Which means her actions are culturally enforced and unethical. Which, granted, ends the episode on a relatively profound note, as this casts a small shadow on the practices of the federation. I don't think they made the wrong decision - it's just that the episode skillfully leads you to doubt it enough for there to be something at stake.

After writing all that, I almost want to give it 4 stars. Damnit, Ferengi!
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Percivale
Sun, Oct 23, 2011, 3:13pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Cost of Living

I agree with the general consensus here that this episode is exceptionally weak. I also liked the comments about Lwaxana's expression of loneliness - I felt that, if you took them in a bubble, it was a great moment of dialogue, truly heartfelt. But the context in which the lines were spoken was a complete waste. The episode was over for me the moment we met her entirely implausible groom-to-be.
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Percivale
Wed, Oct 19, 2011, 9:37pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Outcast

Putting the social message aside for a moment, I want to point out how sub-par both the writing and cinematography were in this episode.

It is boring both to watch and to listen to. Beyond the guest actress's monotone, the conversations were unusually long; the technobabble was particularly uninspired; the scenes were static and slow; and, during one scene (the one where Riker talks with Troi in her quarters), there was even this strange slow zoom that I don't recall seeing in any other TNG episode. It felt like a soap opera in its production values. This could have been much more passionate, but it ended up being very insipid.

I agree with Jammer's "Good intentions. Not much else."
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Valeria
Thu, Jul 21, 2011, 4:43am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Fifth Season Recap

I agree with you on pretty much everything in this season. DS9 was by far my favourite Trek series (though I grew up watching TNG and it holds a special place in my heart), and it's my favourite for all of the reasons you enjoy it. Political intrigue and the separation from the idealized world of the Federation made for an incredibly interesting show. Moral quagmires with no right answer and lasting repercussions were also a strong departure from any previous Trek, as was serialization of episodes. All of these things were masterfully realized in this season.

One thing that really strikes me about your review, though is "And Worf needs to lighten up. ... [A]s a supporting character he's annoying as hell and always looks confused or irritated for no apparent reason." This coming from someone who liked Scott Bakula's portrayal of Captain Archer, the character with only two emotion settings: "Confused" and "Angry". It's my personal opinion that Bakula's acting is what tanked that show (yes, the writing could have been better, and the planning could have been a LOT better, but the writers did get boxed in by having such a one dimensional portrayal of the lead character).

Worf was WAY better than that, even when you throw in the-episode-that-shall-not-be-named.
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Valentine
Tue, Dec 21, 2010, 3:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S2: The Captain's Hand

Jammer, I know your reviews are all written and done, and I love them for the in-depth thought and observations that I miss, but... I started watching BSG (and start watching any interesting TV series) based on it's unique premise and creativity. I get addicted because of romance, sexual tension, and love triangles. I'm always so bitterly disappointed when I finish an episode and run to my computer to see "what did that MEAN?" and you don't even mention whatever glance or pregnant pause that has me in a tither.

I am sick of the Dee/Lee romance though. I'm not sure I trust her, Dualla's character hasn't been well developed. I want the confusing Kara-Lee relationship further explored. Well, I want to explore Lee. Kara's an awesome character, I'll let the writers and cameras do that.
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Avalanche
Fri, Mar 6, 2009, 12:05am (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: Someone to Watch Over Me

I really, really liked this episode. I nearly jumped out of my chair when I heard that Starbuck was playing "All Along the Watchtower", the one song that activated the Final Five. In the review, it is mentioned that the piano player acts as a stand-in for Kara's father. I might be wrong, but I interpreted it all that the piano player WAS Starbuck's father.

Very good episode.
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