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Trish
Wed, Feb 3, 2021, 7:38pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: The Way to Eden

Say what you like about the space hippie music. This episode is worthwhile, if for nothing else, for the piece of advice that makes a great life motto:

Be incorrect (occasionally).
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Trish
Sun, Jan 31, 2021, 9:55pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S1: The Passenger

I happened to tune in right at what was supposed to be the climax of this episode. I was struck by how incredibly slow the pacing was, almost as if it were being run at half speed. Was the script too short or something?

I'm sure it was supposed to heighten the drama, but to me, it just makes it look as if the actors are immersed in molasses.
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Trish
Mon, Jan 18, 2021, 10:27pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Omega Glory

@Jason R.

I believe Eskimo is referring to the line when Tracey tells Kirk that the "animals" happen to look like "us." Because of course, "we" are all white.

At least Sulu had been left aboard ship, so he wasn't saying right in front someone who looked more like "them."
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Trish
Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 4:53am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Corbomite Maneuver

@OmicronThetaDeltaPhi

Agreed!
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Trish
Sun, Dec 27, 2020, 9:31pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S2: The Expanse

@Brendan

Perhaps mechanical odometers were before your time. They DID count backwards when you went in reverse. In fact, that's a plot point in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off."

It was also a standard tactic in "road ralleys" in which part of the score was based on coming as close as possible to the mileage of the planned route.
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Trish
Fri, Dec 25, 2020, 9:16pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Face of the Enemy

Every time I see this episode, I wonder how the events of this episode could have failed to create a major interstellar incident bringing the Federation and the Romulan Empire to the brink (or beyond) of war. Reset Button, poof, no prob.

Regarding the ongoing argument about Marina Sirtis, I think it is unfortunately common for Trek fans to judge the skill of the performers based solely on what they see of them on Star Trek, as if that's any actor's only gig, and sometimes even as if the actor were in fact the character being played. (The logic goes, "If you play a character that's written as a source of warm fuzzy platitudes, then you must be a lightweight who can't think of anything more profound to say.")

I do not see how anyone who has seen Marina Sirtis's performance as the widow of an Iranian businessman in the "L.A. Woman" episode of The Closer could deny that Sirtis has a range at least a fair bit beyond, "Captain, he's hiding something."
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Trish
Tue, Dec 22, 2020, 8:03am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

The current West Point cheating scandal gives a sense of how far off this episode was in the proportionality of the consequences. Getting to finish your time at the Academy on "probation" with the plan for you to still graduate into a career as an officer (assuming that you don't end up instead living on an interdimensional plain with the Traveler) is what you get for cheating on a freshman calculus exam.

Engaging in a forbidden maneuver that gets your wingmate killed? Mere expulsion would be a gift. Try prison.
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Trish
Sun, Dec 13, 2020, 8:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Amok Time

Not just an episode from Classic Trek, but a truly classic Trek episode.

Some thoughts this time around:

First, I found William B's comments years ago very interesting, especially the suggestion that this keeps people from imagining Vulcans as Space Aryans engaged in selective breeding of their own species.

In the James Blish short story collection based on the TOS episodes, there is a line i remember reading but that I do not ever remember having seen when watching the episode. I'm not sure if it was edited out in reruns or if it was cut from the original script. It is the end of Kirk's response to Spock's question about how Kirk supposes Vulcans select their mates. Instead of stopping after saying that he assumed it was done "logically," in Blish's version Kirk adds, "Eugenically, perhaps." I seem to remember hearing that some differences between Blish and the episodes as aired exist because Blish was given early drafts of the scripts before they were shot. I can imagine a long discussion about that one phrase, not unlike William B's observation, but ultimately leading to it being cut as raising too scary of an issue less than two decades after the Third Reich, in connection with a character and a race intended to be more unambiguously admirable than the throwback Khan.

Second, I love what this episode does with the murky relationship between Spock and Christine Chapel. In some episodes, Chapel looks like a silly schoolgirl with a crush on a man who is way out of her league because he is not really a "man." Here, however, we see that somewhere VERY deep down, Spock acknowledges that her interest is not entirely unrequited. Their respective "natures" dictate a relationship that can only hover on the edge of eros. I cannot escape the sense that things might have come out differently for them if … well, if things had been different. That is more poignant than a mere one-sided crush.

I've always thought that the Abrams reboot should have given Spock a relationship with her, rather than with Uhura.

Third, I appreciated the writer's effort to make T'Pau's speech sound formal, traditional, and vaguely religious, but I have always found her repeated use of "thee" as the subject of sentences distracting. Is the Universal Translator calibrated incorrectly to translate her archaic speech? The nominative case is "thou"; "thee" is the objective case. Yeah, I know, professional editors can be SO picky!

And fourth, if you haven't read the Trek novel "Mind Meld," I recommend it, if only for the opportunity to see a Vulcan wedding where things go according to plan.
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Trish
Tue, Dec 1, 2020, 9:36pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

"I let down everyone: the team, my mom, you (Picard) …"

Uh, Wesley, how about Josh? You know, the friend who DIED because of this foolish stunt? Shouldn't the late Josh have been #1 on your list of people you "let down"?

For such a supposedly brilliant prodigy, you're a pretty dumb guy, Wes.
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Trish
Tue, Dec 1, 2020, 7:11pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Court Martial

"All of my old friends look like doctors. All of his look like you."

Because, of course, the two are mutually exclusive.

Ah, the 1960s!
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Trish
Fri, Nov 27, 2020, 11:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Lineage

What this episode shows best is that every starship desperately needs a ship's counselor. Man, Torres, get some therapy!
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Trish
Thu, Nov 19, 2020, 7:49pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Corbomite Maneuver

I think the rest of Trek missed an opportunity this episode offered: Spock playing poker.
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Trish
Mon, Nov 2, 2020, 9:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Rapture

They tell Worf that faith is "not much to bet your life on."

After a years-long wrestling match with cancer, I found myself retorting, "Sometimes it is the only wager you have to lay on the table. And sometimes you actually win the bet."

But then, I also have temporal lobe epilepsy, which tends to make people religious, even mystical. I identify deeply with the Emissary we see in this episode.

Not interested in joining the foaming-mouthed argument that has been going on here for OVER A DECADE.
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Trish
Tue, Oct 27, 2020, 8:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Whom Gods Destroy

Another observation:

This watching was the first time I recall noticing that in a few, mostly solo shots, Marta's green color is more vivid and covers not only her skin but also her teeth and the whites of her eyes, while in most shots in which she appears with other characters, it looks more like a relatively drab color only on her skin.

I wonder, did they change their mind about how to produce the green skin effect partway through shooting, and didn't bother to reshoot the scenes already in the can?
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Trish
Tue, Oct 27, 2020, 7:25pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Whom Gods Destroy

I have long thought that Voyager's writers missed an opportunity to make use of Spock's line about Vulcan children dancing in nursery school. When Neelix pleaded with Tuvok to dance, Tuvok should have said he had not had need of such an exercise since early childhood.

I can see how dance could be an exercise in physical and mental discipline and might speak to the Vulcan sense of structure.
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Trish
Mon, Oct 26, 2020, 11:21pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S6: Pathfinder

I have mixed feelings about this one.

No matter which series, I find it stressful to watch the Barclay character, a caricature of mental illness in a universe that has supposedly solved problems from headaches to poverty, but not his tenuous connection to reality. I don't find his inner torment cute. I find it profoundly sad.

Nonetheless, I realize the reason it strikes me so deeply is because the character is both written and acted skillfully. Credit where credit is due!

I enjoy the happy ending. Very heart-warming.

But my suspension of disbelief is shattered by the fact that apparently Starfleet is apparently willing to let the ends justify the means. That part of the happy ending just doesn't make sense. In what universe would Barclay's career NOT be destroyed by this incident, just because his technique happened to work?

Or perhaps in the enlightened society that is the Federation, he would simply be committed to a treatment center.

For that matter, given his documented history of holoddiction, why would he have had access to unlimited, unsupervised holodeck time? How is that even a remotely a kindness to him, or a practical way of running a research project?
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Trish
Thu, Oct 8, 2020, 12:11am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: Menage a Troi

I realize the writers were writing at their time, but it does kind of surprise me that years' worth of comments don't really land heavily on the idea of making a comedy episode founded on forcible human trafficking and sexual slavery. If this plot had been put in a darker episode, it could have been powerful.

And I agree with SkepticalMI back in 2014: Why didn't Wesley just transport on schedule then contact the Enterprise and have someone pass the word to Data and Geordi to check out the rhythm of the static? Why does he have to sacrifice starting his grown-up career to be the one and only person who can save the day again?
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Trish
Fri, Oct 2, 2020, 12:13am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Sword of Kahless

Man, you know how some things once seen can never be unseen?

Early in the episode when they are looking at the Vulcan schematics (or are they satellite photos?), it looks like a round-faced Vulcanoid is looking out from the image.
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Trish
Thu, Sep 24, 2020, 10:34pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Deadly Years

Random realizations:

When I watched this episode on H & I tonight, I found myself thinking about how the make-up artists succeeded best with making the aged McCoy look like DeForest Kelley really did end up looking in his old age. Everybody else, nowhere near.

Then I found myself saddened at the realization that three of the five performers are gone.

I'll say that the two who remain, William Shatner and Beverly Washburn (Lieutenant Galway), have aged pretty well.

I also found that Beverly Washburn's Wikipedia page was just taken down TODAY.

And I also found myself thinking that the Baby Boomers and the Millennials have in common an engrained belief that the world is rightly theirs. Other age groups are just in the way, and should get OUT of their way. (As a Gen X, I'm sandwiched between them.)
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Trish
Tue, Sep 22, 2020, 8:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: I, Mudd

I agree, Trent. TNG is more friendly to tge idea of utopia, and even tries to present the Federation as fairly utopian.
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Trish
Tue, Sep 22, 2020, 8:05pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Journey to Babel

I also want to mention that even though I wasn't crazy about the premise of the Trek reboot movies ("The entire series you loved now never happened." ) , the one moment in them that rang most true for me was when Sarek answered Spock's question of why he married Amanda truthfully rather than wryly: "Because I loved her."
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Trish
Tue, Sep 22, 2020, 7:54pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Journey to Babel

Love that moment when Spock tries to bolt from his cot alongside the operating table and Nurse Chapel calmly knocks him out with a hypo. Patient autonomy vs. health professional authority must be a pendulum that happens to swing to the same spot in the 23rd century as it occupied in the mid twentieth.
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Trish
Sun, Sep 20, 2020, 10:49pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: I, Mudd

I can't count how many times I've seen this (or any other) Trek episode, but for some reason tonight was the first time I thought about how it is an example of Trek's recurring attempt to convince itself that life as it has worked out is the best of all possible worlds, and it would actually be bad to change things, even (or especially) the tough things.

It's often presented as a struggle against the rigid order imposed by technology, as in this episode where the humanoids have to argue to death the androids that want to conquer them by waiting on them hand and foot, or in "Return of the Archons" where Landru's "peace and joy" stagnates a society, much as Vaal stagnates the primitives in "The Apple." But it's also there in "The Paradise Syndrome"; thought Kirk is unspeakably happy among the quasi-Indians, his salvation is to return to the ship, rather like Picard returning to the Enterprise from a lifetime on a planet long dead.

I'm almost starting to wonder if any episode ISN'T about "this is the best of all possible worlds, so embrace your hardships; they're better than happiness."

I'm not one to believe that message myself. Oh, sure, striving to overcome hardship has a certain value, but paradise would sure be nice.
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Trish
Wed, Sep 16, 2020, 10:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Explorers

i wish I liked this episode. I really do. Heck, I wish I loved it. Like Julian Bashir, it seems to be love/hate, nothing-in-the-middle kind of thing.

I do love "getting to know myself" stories, and this is going for that in several character arcs: Bashir faces up to his almost-valedictory past and learns that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence, O'Brien comes out as a bro by admitting he "doesn't hate" Bashir, Jake gets an opportunity to start his grown-up life as a writer, Sisko gradually moves deeper into his identity as the Emissary who isn't Bajoran but is "of Bajor" enough to show the Cardassians what his adopted people accomplished in ancient times …

… but speaking of ancient times, this episode kept giving me things to hate, one of them being a cringe-a-minute drunk scene with Miles and Julian singing "Jerusalem" (a hymn celebrating the idea that Jesus literally walked in England in ancient times). Then there was the space travel in a papyrus canoe, the teenager actually enjoying spending time cooped up with Dad, the un-Cardassianlike congratulations with not even a suggestion that the whole thing was a Federation spy mission, the CGI that didn't age well in the age of HD television, Jake's Wesley-like delay in leaving the cast credits, I mean, the crew for the next stage of his education, the "hammer/hammock time" reference …

… maybe I am just in the wrong mood to appreciate this episode's charm …

… every single time I see it.
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Trish
Sun, Sep 13, 2020, 9:31pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Destiny

@Elliott

I would not say that it is not "fair" to discuss what the show might be saying about our here-and-now world. Indeed, the Sisko arc is not just talking about a fictional character centuries in the future. It is talking about every person who has grappled with the question of who they really are.

I take particular pleasure in examining literature, including screenplays that end up being acted out on my TV screen, from the perspective of individual human nature. I think this preference on my part is because the less individual, more social explorations of the human condition that the same works also contain can so easily slide into heavy-handed axe-grinding, both by the writers and by those who analyze and argue over their work. I have rarely seen real insight emerge from axe-grinding, just a pile of sharpened axes.

I mean, how often has anyone here actually persuaded you to change your mind about an issue like religion or politics? How often have you changed anyone else's?

Just piles of sharpened axes.

But hey , I guess everyone needs a hobby. This is as good a place as any to indulge in one. Hail Jammer!
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