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Trish
Sat, Nov 16, 2019, 12:12am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S1: The Cloud

About Tuvoc's PM to Kim:

He cautions Kim not to say things that make "junior officers" nervous. Just what officer is more "junior" than Kim? Apparently, Starfleet's usage of that term is not the same as that of the twenty-first century Navy. Just who, in Starfleet parlance, would count as a junior officer, if Kim himself does not? He's an ensign, the lowest of the officer ranks. It can't be in reference to experience, because Kim is on his first mission. Yeah, his station is on the bridge, but that doesn't make him a senior officer, just a bridge officer. Anyway, the only people who would have heard him would be other bridge officers, so "junior" can't be used to mean "non-bridge."

Why do these things drive me nuts?
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Trish
Fri, Nov 15, 2019, 11:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Mudd's Women

Man, I turn my back for a minute, and my metaphorical interpretation of a line in a script blows up into an enraged argument about social justice and definitions of words.

It reminds me of a recent conversation with a friend of mine who has recently been diagnosed as being on autism spectrum. After she read a list of common symptoms, she asked me flat out if she was "literal." I told her yes, she always had been. She asked for examples, so I gave her one. Turned out she wasn't looking for information. She was willing to accept her diagnosis, as long as it was just a label, but on hearing that she actually did have its symptoms, she became defensive as if she were under attack. There was no way to really explain to her what she was "missing," because, well, she was missing the ability to understand what it was.

I'm thinking there may be some folks in this discussion who are also on the spectrum. That's not an insult, or an accusation, or anything that has to be defended against. Just an observation.

I suggest dropping it, guys. There's no point in an argument about this. Some people here see the metaphor, some don't. Sometimes, you just have to take it on faith that others who seem to be saying something crazy are saying it because they see something to which you are blind.
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Trish
Wed, Nov 13, 2019, 9:45pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Mudd's Women

@Booming

As for comparing them to an object, the character speaking the line about the crystal (Spock) is not doing that; he is just talking about the crystal. The screenwriter, I believe, is drawing such a comparison, but not because one that says women are just rocks.

It is the nature of metaphors to compare things that are not alike, by highlighting some way(s) they ARE alike, so it is no insult for a human to be metaphorically represented by an object, especially an object that makes men rich, is a source of great power and is beautiful even when it seems burned out.
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Trish
Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 8:02pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Mudd's Women

Sorry if I missed it, but when I scanned the comments made so far, I didn't see any that noted Spock's line about halfway through the episode as he holds the cracked dilithium crystal: beautiful, even when burned and broken. That line was written into the script for a reason, and Nimoy delivers it very well.

I can see how crystals would appeal to a Vulcan's sense of beauty, as an example of mathematically precise order. For a Vulcan, order has power; order IS power. To see such power pushed beyond its limits is heartbreaking, in as real a way as a Vulcan's heart can be broken.

Eve is a logical woman, making a pragmatic decision based on the precise equation of her life. She finds Mudd and his "cheater" drug distasteful, but the calculation is clear: If she stays on her home planet, there will be no family except her muddy-booted brothers. Mudd offers the only way she can seek a better life.

But pretending to be stupid pushes her past her limit. She is a crystal burned and broken, yet a wise man will see her beauty.

I'm a feminist, and there is much in this episode to make me uncomfortable. (I'd swear the original had a line from Mudd about the drug making men "more intelligent," because it gives you "more of what you have.") But the characters of Eve and Childers have always felt very real to me. I have long imagined a scene many years later, when they've been married quite a while, and Eve sends one of their kids to hang up the dinner pots to be sandblasted. I see them as a couple getting married because it seemed the logical thing to do, through the years learning to love each other.
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Trish
Mon, Nov 11, 2019, 8:08pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Enemy Within

@Jim Seigler

I agree completely! Your comment is basically the one I came to make: Neither one of them should be considered an "impostor."
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Trish
Sun, Nov 10, 2019, 8:59pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Birthright, Part II

So what language is being spoken in this camp? Obviously not Klingonese, because the generation raised there need the lyrics of a Klingon song translated for them line by line. They're not using something like a universal translator, because it's not translating the Klingon.

I guess I can imagine the prisoners being fluent in Romulan by now, and it might be their children's first language, if that's what's spoken in the camp. But is Worf fluent in Romulan?

I know, we're not supposed to ask these things.
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Trish
Thu, Nov 7, 2019, 1:01am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: Tears of the Prophets

Okay, just making sure I follow:

Sisko has embraced his identity as the Emissary.

He has come to accept the revelations of the Prophets.

He has accepted the revelation of the Prophets that he is "of Bajor."

The Prophets told him not to leave Bajor, but he yielded to Starfleet pressure to do so.

He believes his subordinate and friend is dead and the wormhole has been closed because he left Bajor.

He (understandably) needs to take some time to reflect and get his head together.

He decides to do this by going to …

… his father's restaurant on Earth to scrub potatoes?

Not, for example, on retreat at monastery on Bajor?

Not to some little cottage on a quiet hillside, on BAJOR?
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Trish
Mon, Nov 4, 2019, 7:56pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: All Our Yesterdays

"Atoz" is such a good name for a librarian. His name is on the spine of every single-volume reference book: A to Z.
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Trish
Sun, Oct 20, 2019, 10:03pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The Inner Light

A grief worse than losing a career, a parent, a spouse, a child:

Realizing you never had them to lose.
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Trish
Thu, Oct 17, 2019, 8:20pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Is There In Truth No Beauty?

@Chrome

I even checked to see if the same composer was involved with both shows, but nope.

Subconscious plagiarism?
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Trish
Thu, Oct 17, 2019, 8:08pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky

I think Springy has a good point about the title. Think of it as spoken by McCoy himself: "My world has been hollow, but I have touched the heights of happiness."

I think it was meant to be his Paradise Syndrome, but it didn't really convey the poignance of the road not taken. Perhaps if Natira, like Miramanee, had died … But that would have been just the same story, wouldn't it?
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Trish
Mon, Oct 14, 2019, 8:01pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Is There In Truth No Beauty?

Amazing how much the music played close to the end of the episode while Kirk gives Miranda a rose sounds like the Brady Bunch theme.

"It's the story of a lovely lady, who is mind-linked with an uggo named Kollos …"
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Trish
Sun, Oct 13, 2019, 8:18pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: And the Children Shall Lead

I do think that it is a better episode thannJammer and those who commented before me give it credit for.

It's true that it is thin on motivation, apparently just evil for evil's own sake. I am willing to presume that the evil angel has more of a motivation than that, but I wish we were privy to it.

His way of accomplishing that evil is the one thing of interest, and it underlies everything that happens in the episode: Evil manipulates the specific "beast" in each person, some quality that usually serves them well but has been twisted into a dangerous weakness:

Sulu's enthusiasm for martial arts, a respect that needs but a nudge to plunge him into an abyss of terror.

Uhura's youthful vitality and beauty, betraying a paralyzing fear of the ugliness of death.

Chekov's reverence for Starfleet's hierarchy, which usually gives him unswerving loyalty to his captain but is rooted in a deep fear of disobedience, even when the situation calls for him to question authority.

Scotty's dedication to the physical operation of the ship, perverted into a protectiveness that loses all sense of that ship's purpose.

Kirk's own identity as a natural leader, turned against him as he fears losing control over his ship and crew.

And of course, it all started with the children's beast, their dependence upon loving parents, a dependence they transferred onto an evil being who used their fantasies of power for his own aims.

As for the evil angel himself, he insists, "I fear nothing," but he ultimately fears the most powerful beast of all, the one beast that could have conquered all the personal beasts he had exploited: the truth.

The episode's execution is not always perfect, but the story beneath the plot is a profound one about the universal human experience. This episode implicitly asks two questions of every viewer: "What is your beast?" and then "How can you keep evil from exploiting it?"

Entire spiritual retreats have been structured around such questions. I think they make this episode worth a great deal more than half a star.

I'm not afraid of being alone in that assessment.
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Trish
Sun, Oct 13, 2019, 7:23pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: And the Children Shall Lead

McCoy: "Well, I won't stop you from questioning the children, but it could harm them if you do."

So this DOCTOR believes that Kirk's intended course of action has a real possibility of harming children who have just been through a terrible trauma, but defers to the captain's decision? What happened to the Chief Medical Officer's authority in matters of health? Shouldn't he be ordering the captain to take the kids to the starbase for the treatment he believes, in his expert medical opinion, they require? Or at the very least ordering him not to play psychotherapist with them?

Apparently, that whole "the doctor can overrule even the captain in case of medical necessity" thing only applies when convenient to the story.
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Trish
Fri, Oct 11, 2019, 8:58pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Cause and Effect

I actually am a little surprised to see so many people agreeing with my own opinion that this is one of my favorite episodes.

It's my personal favorite because I happen to have temporal lobe epilepsy, which gives me deja vu episodes.
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Trish
Tue, Oct 1, 2019, 12:47am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: A Private Little War

@Peter G.

The issue I'm pointing out is that in that "universe" (not the Trek universe specifically, but the "real" world view of the time), her lack of "any other avenue" was not being critiqued or challenged by the storyteller, but simply presumed as the way things were.

I remember back in college when we studied Euripides' play Medea, and the professor pointed out to us that her speeches that might seem to us to have justified her actions and made her the heroine would not have been intended that way at the time. She was not supposed to be a heroine you would love, but a villainess you would "love to hate."

Nona, too, is a villainess in the story. Some of us may understand her character's outrage now, and even at some level cheer for her behind-the-scenes machinations, but that is a revisionist approach to the narrative. I'm glad you see it that way NOW, but in its time, the presumptions woven into the episode (which remember was within a series that was very self-consciously modern and progressive from its creator's point of view) were exactly the kind of attitudes that feminists were fighting against, and that would never have simply faded away without a fight. The feminists who seem so strident from today's perspective were in a battle for their lives, that is, for the lives they wanted to live, not the lives the Nonas of their real world had.

It was also a battle for the lives of not only women who would come after them but of men who would come after them as well, lives in which the kind of revisionist reinterpretation of stories like this one would seem natural.
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Trish
Mon, Sep 30, 2019, 7:44pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: A Private Little War

People below the age of 40 or so, both men and women, are sometimes puzzled by what they see as the strident tone of feminists, and they think that feminists of days gone by just didn't know how to stand up for themselves and live their own life. Why did they have to FIGHT about everything?

The people who don't get why feminists had to fight did not grow up in a time when shows like this, that were still new or in their first round of reruns at the time, communicated "obvious" assumption that a woman could not be a leader in her own right, even if she was intelligent, knowledgeable, and strong. She could only act through a man, and she usually did so by means of distasteful manipulative behavior, and was often on the "wrong" side.

There was no standing up for yourself and living your own life. That was for men. Women were supposed to find a man to hitch their lives to, and hope that he was intelligent, knowledgeable, and strong enough to give her a good life.
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Trish
Sat, Sep 28, 2019, 7:55pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Wolf in the Fold

Has it occurred to anybody else that maybe Next Generation should have made the hedonistic pleasure planet so popular for shore leave Argelius, instead of making up Risa?
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Trish
Wed, Sep 18, 2019, 8:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Metamorphosis

So Nancy Hedford had no friends, relatives, or colleagues who would have liked the opportunity to visit her, or at least communicate with her? It was all right to tell them that she was dead, even though she is actually alive as half of a joined being, not because she asked to drop out of sight, but because Cochrane did?
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Trish
Tue, Sep 17, 2019, 10:16pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Ascent

I have to say I'm a bit surprised by the generally positive reactions to this episode. It just doesn't do much for me. It seems like an hour of exposition.

"Show me, don't tell me." But the dialog is mostly the characters in the adversarial/bosom buddies pairs TELLING what they are and how they see each other. Despite the painfully high stakes for Odo and Quark, there really isn't much of a plot, and what little there is has holes in it like Swiss cheese. (Not only, as Quarkissnyder said above, is there no way they'd survive without water, but they should be suffering from altitude sickness, which makes dehydration even worse. The whole point in climbing the mountain is to get to thinner air.)

And yes, after Odo is injured, it should be perfectly obvious to them both (and to the writer, and to us) that Quark should continue the ascent alone. If their plan works, a rescue ship will come and can use its scanners to locate Odo, apparently the only other humanoid on the planet. If it doesn't, their mutual problem will soon reach its dire resolution.

I have nothing against a good bromance. Heck, they could have thrown in a C plot with Bashir and O'Brien. But even a character story needs a story.
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Trish
Fri, Aug 2, 2019, 7:39pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: The Savage Curtain

Arena: Kirk is forced by an alien to fight the Gorn while the crew can only watch from the ship.

The Gamesters of Triskelion: Kirk is forced by aliens to fight the thralls while the crew can only watch from the ship.

The Savage Curtain: Kirk (this time along with Spock) is forced by an alien to fight simulations of historical bad guys alongside historical good guys while the crew can only …

Once might have been creative. But every single season?!

I'm a fan of Trek, but I can't deny its flaws.
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Trish
Sun, Jul 14, 2019, 7:40pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Is There In Truth No Beauty?

Ah, the irony no Next Generation fan could miss:

"I realize you can do almost anything a sighted person can do, but you cannot fly a starship …"

… Geordi.
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Trish
Fri, Jun 28, 2019, 7:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Immunity Syndrome

Is everybody else okay with those weak women being the ones who immediately started fainting left and right?

Of course, it did give us an opportunity to see more female crew members than in probably any other half dozen episodes combined.
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Trish
Wed, Jun 26, 2019, 8:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Gamesters of Triskelion

It's hard to take any episode seriously as an anti-slavery tract or as anything else when they couldn't even be bothered to have Shatner look like he was TRYING not to "step on the opposing color" in the climactic contest.

This episode wasn't a serious anything.
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Trish
Fri, Jun 14, 2019, 8:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Too Short a Season

I think many people are thinking of the anti-aging drug as a tangential subplot, but it's the whole point: Much as a person might want to "go back" to fix and/or atone for the mistakes of youth, the attempt to do so is fatal to the person they have become.

Despite bad make-up and worse acting, this episode starts looking a lot better when you reach the time of life when you have to start facing that reality.
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