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Trish
Thu, Oct 8, 2020, 12:11am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: Menage a Troi

I realize the writers were writing at their time, but it does kind of surprise me that years' worth of comments don't really land heavily on the idea of making a comedy episode founded on forcible human trafficking and sexual slavery. If this plot had been put in a darker episode, it could have been powerful.

And I agree with SkepticalMI back in 2014: Why didn't Wesley just transport on schedule then contact the Enterprise and have someone pass the word to Data and Geordi to check out the rhythm of the static? Why does he have to sacrifice starting his grown-up career to be the one and only person who can save the day again?
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Trish
Fri, Oct 2, 2020, 12:13am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Sword of Kahless

Man, you know how some things once seen can never be unseen?

Early in the episode when they are looking at the Vulcan schematics (or are they satellite photos?), it looks like a round-faced Vulcanoid is looking out from the image.
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Trish
Thu, Sep 24, 2020, 10:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: The Deadly Years

Random realizations:

When I watched this episode on H & I tonight, I found myself thinking about how the make-up artists succeeded best with making the aged McCoy look like DeForest Kelley really did end up looking in his old age. Everybody else, nowhere near.

Then I found myself saddened at the realization that three of the five performers are gone.

I'll say that the two who remain, William Shatner and Beverly Washburn (Lieutenant Galway), have aged pretty well.

I also found that Beverly Washburn's Wikipedia page was just taken down TODAY.

And I also found myself thinking that the Baby Boomers and the Millennials have in common an engrained belief that the world is rightly theirs. Other age groups are just in the way, and should get OUT of their way. (As a Gen X, I'm sandwiched between them.)
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Trish
Tue, Sep 22, 2020, 8:19pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: I, Mudd

I agree, Trent. TNG is more friendly to tge idea of utopia, and even tries to present the Federation as fairly utopian.
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Trish
Tue, Sep 22, 2020, 8:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: Journey to Babel

I also want to mention that even though I wasn't crazy about the premise of the Trek reboot movies ("The entire series you loved now never happened." ) , the one moment in them that rang most true for me was when Sarek answered Spock's question of why he married Amanda truthfully rather than wryly: "Because I loved her."
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Trish
Tue, Sep 22, 2020, 7:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: Journey to Babel

Love that moment when Spock tries to bolt from his cot alongside the operating table and Nurse Chapel calmly knocks him out with a hypo. Patient autonomy vs. health professional authority must be a pendulum that happens to swing to the same spot in the 23rd century as it occupied in the mid twentieth.
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Trish
Sun, Sep 20, 2020, 10:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: I, Mudd

I can't count how many times I've seen this (or any other) Trek episode, but for some reason tonight was the first time I thought about how it is an example of Trek's recurring attempt to convince itself that life as it has worked out is the best of all possible worlds, and it would actually be bad to change things, even (or especially) the tough things.

It's often presented as a struggle against the rigid order imposed by technology, as in this episode where the humanoids have to argue to death the androids that want to conquer them by waiting on them hand and foot, or in "Return of the Archons" where Landru's "peace and joy" stagnates a society, much as Vaal stagnates the primitives in "The Apple." But it's also there in "The Paradise Syndrome"; thought Kirk is unspeakably happy among the quasi-Indians, his salvation is to return to the ship, rather like Picard returning to the Enterprise from a lifetime on a planet long dead.

I'm almost starting to wonder if any episode ISN'T about "this is the best of all possible worlds, so embrace your hardships; they're better than happiness."

I'm not one to believe that message myself. Oh, sure, striving to overcome hardship has a certain value, but paradise would sure be nice.
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Trish
Wed, Sep 16, 2020, 10:24pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Explorers

i wish I liked this episode. I really do. Heck, I wish I loved it. Like Julian Bashir, it seems to be love/hate, nothing-in-the-middle kind of thing.

I do love "getting to know myself" stories, and this is going for that in several character arcs: Bashir faces up to his almost-valedictory past and learns that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence, O'Brien comes out as a bro by admitting he "doesn't hate" Bashir, Jake gets an opportunity to start his grown-up life as a writer, Sisko gradually moves deeper into his identity as the Emissary who isn't Bajoran but is "of Bajor" enough to show the Cardassians what his adopted people accomplished in ancient times …

… but speaking of ancient times, this episode kept giving me things to hate, one of them being a cringe-a-minute drunk scene with Miles and Julian singing "Jerusalem" (a hymn celebrating the idea that Jesus literally walked in England in ancient times). Then there was the space travel in a papyrus canoe, the teenager actually enjoying spending time cooped up with Dad, the un-Cardassianlike congratulations with not even a suggestion that the whole thing was a Federation spy mission, the CGI that didn't age well in the age of HD television, Jake's Wesley-like delay in leaving the cast credits, I mean, the crew for the next stage of his education, the "hammer/hammock time" reference …

… maybe I am just in the wrong mood to appreciate this episode's charm …

… every single time I see it.
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Trish
Sun, Sep 13, 2020, 9:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Destiny

@Elliott

I would not say that it is not "fair" to discuss what the show might be saying about our here-and-now world. Indeed, the Sisko arc is not just talking about a fictional character centuries in the future. It is talking about every person who has grappled with the question of who they really are.

I take particular pleasure in examining literature, including screenplays that end up being acted out on my TV screen, from the perspective of individual human nature. I think this preference on my part is because the less individual, more social explorations of the human condition that the same works also contain can so easily slide into heavy-handed axe-grinding, both by the writers and by those who analyze and argue over their work. I have rarely seen real insight emerge from axe-grinding, just a pile of sharpened axes.

I mean, how often has anyone here actually persuaded you to change your mind about an issue like religion or politics? How often have you changed anyone else's?

Just piles of sharpened axes.

But hey , I guess everyone needs a hobby. This is as good a place as any to indulge in one. Hail Jammer!
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Trish
Sun, Sep 13, 2020, 8:57pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: Who Mourns for Adonais?

Half the fun of this site is that passionate debates can stretch on for literally years.

Sometimes, people's choices about what to spend their time and passion arguing about leave me scratching my head. I'm amazed how long anyone could invest time and passion in defending the assumption that a woman 's career is obviously over when and because she gets married (and a man's career even more obviously isn't) or in claiming that such an assumption somehow ISN'T sexist or isn't clearly a manifestation of 1960s attitudes.

I really don't think it takes a radical feminist to recognize from a twenty-first century perspective that this snippet of dialog is a result of 1960s sexism. Just your basic twenty-first century non-misogynist.
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Trish
Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 11:01pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Life Support

@EventualZen

Actually, I think your example is one of the times when "human" is being used more specifically for our species. Brunt is condemning Quark's action as "humanitarian," that is, as something a "human" would do, not a Ferengi. Many Ferengi characters say "Hu-man" as a derisive term.
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Trish
Tue, Sep 8, 2020, 10:42pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Destiny

I think when people sink deeply into debates about religion in the universe in which we live, they tend to lose sight of what is going on in the universe the writers have created.

This episode is not about whether the Prophets are gods. It's about whether Sisko is, and more fundamentally whether he considers himself to be their Emissary.

If you've watched the whole series a time or two, you know that by the end, he does. This episode is a milestone in his character's arc. He hasn't exactly "converted" to that belief yet, but for the first time, he's really taking it seriously as a possibility instead of rejecting it as impossible because for the Bajorans, it is a religious title and "everybody knows" (or at least everybody in Starfleet knows) that religion just plain isn't real.

The episode title "Destiny" is not just about a comet breaking up at the mouth of the wormhole and whether an ancient prophecy foretold it. It's about what Sisko is destined to be.
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Trish
Sun, Sep 6, 2020, 10:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Life Support

A pet peeve of mine is that Trek never made an effort to come up with substitute terms for "human" and "humanity" when they are clearly not talking about the Homo Sapiens species that evolved on the third planet in the Sol system but about "all that has ultimate dignity". This always struck me as lazy futuristic fiction, especially because they at times do have characters use the word "human" for the specific species we all happen to be members of.

Are we supposed to believe that, despite all the enlightened ideas that undergird Federation society, they have not yet even reached the "inclusive language" stage when it comes to interspecies relations? "Oh, when we say 'human' we mean 'sentient and sapient being.' You should realize that. Humans certainly do."
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Trish
Wed, Sep 2, 2020, 9:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Fascination

All in all, I have to say the "Row, row, row your boat" scene was better.
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Trish
Tue, Sep 1, 2020, 10:01pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Defiant

i have always resented the way this episode "burned" Tom Riker's career as a motivated Starfleet officer with lost time to make up for. The idea of a pair of "transporter twins" who shared a past but not their futures had a lot more potential than first sending the twin away on a deep-space mission and then having him make a disastrous decision that got him a life sentence we may have hoped would end with a dramatic rescue at some point but never did.
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Trish
Tue, Sep 1, 2020, 9:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Pen Pals

Probably like most people who are passionate enough Trek fans to visit this site fairly regularly, I have seen this episode more times than I can count, and although Wesley the Wunderkind normally drives me nuts, for some reason I've always enjoyed the way this episode approaches his "first command." I think tonight, I got a sense of what the "some reason" might be for me:

In my life, I have known some people, and seen from afar some I can't claim to know personally, who came across as natural leaders from a young age. Wesley is not like them, and neither was I. You know the saying that some are born to greatness and some have greatness thrust on them? Well, a lot of things could be substituted for "greatness" in that maxim, and "leadership" is one of them. The learning curve can be steep. Wesley was lucky enough to get some mentoring from people who took to command like ducks to water, and it was a fun process to watch.
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Trish
Tue, Aug 25, 2020, 10:02pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: The House of Quark

This was a good week for me to see this episode, which I find myself renaming "Forensic Accounting Comes to Q'onos."

As I tried to catch up on my business's bookkeeping and discovered I had reversed the debits and credits on an entire year's depreciation transactions, believe me, I realized that accounting is not for the faint of heart.

Go get 'em, Courageous Quark.
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Trish
Sat, Nov 16, 2019, 12:12am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: The Cloud

About Tuvoc's PM to Kim:

He cautions Kim not to say things that make "junior officers" nervous. Just what officer is more "junior" than Kim? Apparently, Starfleet's usage of that term is not the same as that of the twenty-first century Navy. Just who, in Starfleet parlance, would count as a junior officer, if Kim himself does not? He's an ensign, the lowest of the officer ranks. It can't be in reference to experience, because Kim is on his first mission. Yeah, his station is on the bridge, but that doesn't make him a senior officer, just a bridge officer. Anyway, the only people who would have heard him would be other bridge officers, so "junior" can't be used to mean "non-bridge."

Why do these things drive me nuts?
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Trish
Fri, Nov 15, 2019, 11:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Mudd's Women

Man, I turn my back for a minute, and my metaphorical interpretation of a line in a script blows up into an enraged argument about social justice and definitions of words.

It reminds me of a recent conversation with a friend of mine who has recently been diagnosed as being on autism spectrum. After she read a list of common symptoms, she asked me flat out if she was "literal." I told her yes, she always had been. She asked for examples, so I gave her one. Turned out she wasn't looking for information. She was willing to accept her diagnosis, as long as it was just a label, but on hearing that she actually did have its symptoms, she became defensive as if she were under attack. There was no way to really explain to her what she was "missing," because, well, she was missing the ability to understand what it was.

I'm thinking there may be some folks in this discussion who are also on the spectrum. That's not an insult, or an accusation, or anything that has to be defended against. Just an observation.

I suggest dropping it, guys. There's no point in an argument about this. Some people here see the metaphor, some don't. Sometimes, you just have to take it on faith that others who seem to be saying something crazy are saying it because they see something to which you are blind.
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Trish
Wed, Nov 13, 2019, 9:45pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Mudd's Women

@Booming

As for comparing them to an object, the character speaking the line about the crystal (Spock) is not doing that; he is just talking about the crystal. The screenwriter, I believe, is drawing such a comparison, but not because one that says women are just rocks.

It is the nature of metaphors to compare things that are not alike, by highlighting some way(s) they ARE alike, so it is no insult for a human to be metaphorically represented by an object, especially an object that makes men rich, is a source of great power and is beautiful even when it seems burned out.
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Trish
Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 8:02pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Mudd's Women

Sorry if I missed it, but when I scanned the comments made so far, I didn't see any that noted Spock's line about halfway through the episode as he holds the cracked dilithium crystal: beautiful, even when burned and broken. That line was written into the script for a reason, and Nimoy delivers it very well.

I can see how crystals would appeal to a Vulcan's sense of beauty, as an example of mathematically precise order. For a Vulcan, order has power; order IS power. To see such power pushed beyond its limits is heartbreaking, in as real a way as a Vulcan's heart can be broken.

Eve is a logical woman, making a pragmatic decision based on the precise equation of her life. She finds Mudd and his "cheater" drug distasteful, but the calculation is clear: If she stays on her home planet, there will be no family except her muddy-booted brothers. Mudd offers the only way she can seek a better life.

But pretending to be stupid pushes her past her limit. She is a crystal burned and broken, yet a wise man will see her beauty.

I'm a feminist, and there is much in this episode to make me uncomfortable. (I'd swear the original had a line from Mudd about the drug making men "more intelligent," because it gives you "more of what you have.") But the characters of Eve and Childers have always felt very real to me. I have long imagined a scene many years later, when they've been married quite a while, and Eve sends one of their kids to hang up the dinner pots to be sandblasted. I see them as a couple getting married because it seemed the logical thing to do, through the years learning to love each other.
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Trish
Mon, Nov 11, 2019, 8:08pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: The Enemy Within

@Jim Seigler

I agree completely! Your comment is basically the one I came to make: Neither one of them should be considered an "impostor."
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Trish
Sun, Nov 10, 2019, 8:59pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Birthright, Part II

So what language is being spoken in this camp? Obviously not Klingonese, because the generation raised there need the lyrics of a Klingon song translated for them line by line. They're not using something like a universal translator, because it's not translating the Klingon.

I guess I can imagine the prisoners being fluent in Romulan by now, and it might be their children's first language, if that's what's spoken in the camp. But is Worf fluent in Romulan?

I know, we're not supposed to ask these things.
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Trish
Thu, Nov 7, 2019, 1:01am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Tears of the Prophets

Okay, just making sure I follow:

Sisko has embraced his identity as the Emissary.

He has come to accept the revelations of the Prophets.

He has accepted the revelation of the Prophets that he is "of Bajor."

The Prophets told him not to leave Bajor, but he yielded to Starfleet pressure to do so.

He believes his subordinate and friend is dead and the wormhole has been closed because he left Bajor.

He (understandably) needs to take some time to reflect and get his head together.

He decides to do this by going to …

… his father's restaurant on Earth to scrub potatoes?

Not, for example, on retreat at monastery on Bajor?

Not to some little cottage on a quiet hillside, on BAJOR?
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Trish
Mon, Nov 4, 2019, 7:56pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: All Our Yesterdays

"Atoz" is such a good name for a librarian. His name is on the spine of every single-volume reference book: A to Z.
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