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Trent
Fri, Aug 30, 2019, 11:35am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: First Contact

Peter said: "Everything about Krola is moronic, exemplified by his ludicrous glasses prescription."

I always thought this was brilliant. He's literally myopic and short-sighted.
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Trent
Tue, Aug 13, 2019, 1:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

Theo said: "He clearly cared deeply about her well-being before he even met her."

Only after prompted by Crusher. Picard rationalizes her "slavery" - using old school cultural relativism, and hiding behind the Prime Directive - until Crusher pushes him to visit the metamorph's quarters.

Theo wrote: "@Skeptical wrote a pretty brilliant hypotehtical interpretation that comes to precisely the opposite conclusion as you, suggesting that Picard may have actually 'saved' her to a degree"

That's the common reading of the episode; the metamorph "tragically imprints on Picard" whilst "forced to dutifully marry the King". I would say whether this works out best for the metamorph or not, is beside the point.

We're talking about an alien who meets Picard and is instantly ordering "Tea, Earl Grey" for him. She knows him inside out.

What unfolds is then a kind of game of self-delusion. Picard convinces himself of his nobility ("Have I not done everything possible to discourage this?", "I don't want to use you as other men do") and convinces himself that there is no manipulation involved in their relationship. Her pheromones aren't affecting him, he believes, and his desires aren't affecting her. The sham culminates with a wedding on a holodeck, a place itself dependent upon shared delusions.

The metamorph, meanwhile, is continually (and instantly!) mirroring back to Picard everything he wants. The MOMENT he sees her standing before a mirror in a wedding dress, she out of the blue says "I will never truly love him". She then flatters Picard's vanity: he, she reveals, "opens her mind and heart to endless new possibilities" and she "only likes herself when she is with him". She essentially paints Picard as a Kirk-figure: the one-of-a-kind spaceman who tames every alien gal he encounters!

Of course Picard doesn't believe he's being duped. After all, she imprinted on him! And him alone! He's special! The chosen one!

But imprinting is itself a kind of lie; like the giving of one's virginity, or finding a "true love" or "soul mate", she plays to his ego. Picard is suddenly the only one in the universe worthy to take her, the cause of her awakening, the special one who irrevocably changed her, brought her into womanhood and fullness. They may be forced apart, she says, but he will always be in her heart! This kind of romantic male fantasy is exactly what Picard wants. "For a metamorph," she then tells him, "there's no greater pleasure and no greater wish than to bond as I've bonded with you. Who I am today, I will be forever." And Picard laps the deception up.

Ultimately, however you read the episode, it's a really ambiguous and deliciously open-ended little story. It's a shame the bad stuff in it is so corny, because its one of Trek's best "romance episodes" and a really cool piece of SF writing.
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Trent
Mon, Aug 12, 2019, 9:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

I rewatched this episode today, to see what all the reignited fuss was about - I'd last seen it decade ago, and remember it being a clever, subversive piece of writing by Trek savior Michael Piller - and once again found it to be a genius piece of writing.

What you have here is an alien who's literally a male fantasy object. She instantly becomes and does what men unconsciously and/or consciously desire, and her entire culture and upbringing gears her toward such subservience.

This is not a "sexist episode", or a "juvenile fantasy", as others have labelled it above, but a critique of sexism, and how even women internalize their own oppression, integrating the attitudes, values, standards and the opinions of others into their own identity or sense of self. As Peter explains above, the episode's title is clearly ironic: what constitutes a perfect mate oft hinges on a denial of another's subjectivity.

But Piller's script goes further, pushing the episode into far more interesting, and creepier, territory. The episode pretends to be about "Picard helping the metamorph", gallantly leading her into enlightenment. The episode pretends to be about a guy chivalrously attempting to save a slave and nobly teaching her to cast off her chains. The episode pretends to be about an alien who "gets smarter", "learns to value herself" and "nobly sacrifices herself for peace". But as the constant shots of the alien posed in a mirror emphasize, the metamorph's merely reflecting back to the watcher what the subject wishes to see.

In Picard's case, he's suckered into a romance (and presumably sex) by an alien who echoes back to him a sexist fantasy which he smugly deems enlightened and compassionate. The more the metamorph drifts toward Picard's ideal - self-sacrificial, interested in archaeology, music, the greater good, existing to boost his enlightened self-image etc - the more he cares about her well-being. Her value, then, remains still bound up in the preferences and desires of men.

Picard's realization at the end isn't that he failed to rescue the damsel, or that she'd finally become an "autonomous female character", or that she "tragically and nobly sacrifices herself". No, his realization is that he's little better than every sexist creep who'd been using the metamorph. "How did you resist her?" the ambassador asks, before leaving the ship. But Picard didn't, and that's what disturbs him. And it's a profoundly disturbing realization; the sexism of the "nice guy", the "white knight" etc.

The episode has some flaws. The Ferengi - obviously inserted as a kind of reference to their sexist culture - are unnecessary, and the hangar bay scenes in which the metamorph is "birthed" from a cocoon, are silly. Better to have her simply arrive in the first act on the transporter pad. Some of the "sexy dialogue" is also silly in a soft-core porn/1940s femme fatale kind of way.

But these are minor problems. The episode's premise is clever, its scenes with Crusher and Picard are great, the glimpses of the alien cultures are neat (Picard plays a giant alien xylophone), and the whole thing is creepy, ambiguous, and filled with behavior and dialogue operating on a level both Picard and the metamorph seem blind to.
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Trent
Mon, Aug 12, 2019, 6:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

Theo said: "In either case, you will rely on scientific consensus at the end."

The social sciences tend to expose forms of past and present exploitation which modern western conservatism deems natural, good or non-existent. Academia, and academic consensus, thus quickly becomes "the enemy".

This leads to a weird kind of double-motion. The conservative is always ranting about "postmodernism" and "the evils of relativism" (which supposedly "destroys our traditions"), whilst simultaneously incessantly pointing out that the sciences are "just pushing subjective theories" because "everything is falsifiable" and "that's just like your opinion, man" because "I believe in different facts". Conservatism, then, as postmodernity writ large.

Along with stuff like denying climate change (or racism, or class, or non binary genders etc), one of the most popular buzzwords to contest over the past few years (in the West; almost nobody cares about this stuff outside the US) has been "the patriarchy".

So you get a lot of guys seeing "the patriarchy" as a "feminist conspiracy designed to attack men" (despite the term - or terms like "kyriarchy" - being used to also describe men being victims of other men), whilst also believing the "patriarchy is natural" and "beneficial to everyone" anyway, or "just a hierarchy of competence" or a "result of biology". So it simultaneously doesn't exist, and is good anyway, and a figment of "feminists' imagination".

But the idea of a "patriarchy" spans different fields. Experts in language, literature, history, anthropology, religion, law etc have all detailed countless forms of covert/overt female oppression throughout history. But all of this is casually dismissed as a "feminism101" plot.
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Trent
Fri, Aug 9, 2019, 8:57pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: Hollow Pursuits

This episode has aged really well.

We get some good Guinan scenes, Troi is used well, the comedy is great, the holodeck scenes are witty/funny, and Picard's management skills are showcased to good effect - he brings the awkward Barclay into the fold - though this requires the contrivance of Georgie and Riker becoming heartless, tactless brutes for an episode.

And while the episode degenerates into another "forced action climax", it's an interesting one, and for once the engineering team seem like actual engineers working sequentially through a tough problem.

With the rise of virtual realities, machine learning AIs, smart phones and face swapping and deep faking technology, TNG also seems quite prescient about tech addiction. With this episode and The Game, you have some of the most chaste, innocuous, but pin-point precise science fiction tales about modern techno-sexual fantasies/fetishes/addictions.
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Trent
Fri, Aug 9, 2019, 8:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

lol, Booming sniffed out that Jordan Peterson link fast.

Jason, Jordan Peterson is a Koch funded, Big Oil, climate denying, Heritage, Cato shill, paid by some of the biggest conservative think tanks on the planet, who's rolled out by banksters to speak at the The Trilateral Commission, who, along with George Bush, is the face of PHP Agency, a multilevel marketing company denounced as a ponzi scheme, who platforms self-identified white nationalists, who defends chicks who promote the Great Replacement conspiracy, who promotes the "rapid onset gender dysphoria" conspiracy (an echo of the "they're not really gay, they're faking it!" hysteria that homosexuals once had to endure), who regularly outright lies about the scientific papers he cites, and who's book quotes papers by actual scientists who've had to denounce him for mis-using their data.

The guy is all kinds of uber-conservative evil, but he does it in a sneaky, low-key way, so he's expert at convincing people that "the patriarchy is not a thing", "feminists are evil" and "sociologists like Booming" are OUT TA GETCHA WITH THEIR TWISTESD, SATANIC, TRADITION-KILLING POSTMODERNIST LINGO.
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Trent
Fri, Aug 9, 2019, 9:57am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: The Road Not Taken

I hope it doesn't become serialized.

Episodic science fiction is like a fun box of chocolate. You never know whatcha gonna get.
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Trent
Fri, Jul 26, 2019, 7:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

I hadn't seen that RedLetterMedia review before, so thanks for posting it. It's a quite subversive review, in the sense that it really lays hard into our whole zeitgeist.
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Trent
Fri, May 24, 2019, 2:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

Thankfully, according to google, it's actually actress Merrin Dungey's voice in the teaser. So no Michael.
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Trent
Fri, May 24, 2019, 2:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

Wait, lol, the show is called PICARD? They literally called the show PICARD? And the tagline is THE END IS ONLY THE BEGINNING?

This already feels as hacky as Discovery.

MadManMUC said: "Though the vineyard footage was beautifully shot."

IMO it's not beautiful at all. Like Discovery, it's just expensive and overproduced. The ideas, compositions, mis-en-scene, over-worked lighting...again, it's the Michael Bay school of art. Or a Thomas Kincaid painting. Everything pushed far beyond the point of good taste, and filmed by people with a background in commercial advertising.
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Trent
Fri, May 24, 2019, 2:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

I found that Picard trailer to be kitschy and cliched, and filled with the usual grimdark/edgelord trimmings ("Did you lose your faith in Starfleet?", "Tell us why you left the Federation!" etc). The voice over, which sounds like SMG, also makes it seem as though Discovery/Picard are going to have some tie-ins (please god, no).

It's depressing that Trek constantly needs to "test the Federation" and cook up stories in which "people are fighting for Federation values!" (Rah! Rah!). The implicit message is that writers can't envision what simply living, working and exploring in Starfleet/the Federation, entails, and how this might be an interesting, beautiful thing in as of itself. It's a phony motion: cynicism in the guise of affirming optimism.
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Trent
Sun, May 12, 2019, 10:20am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: The Road Not Taken

Avis blesses us upon this glorious day.
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Trent
Thu, May 9, 2019, 6:20am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S1: Mad Idolatry

Christianity used to be cool and edgy, man. This was a religion about a gender-neutral hebephile who impregnates their own underage mother in order to incestuously give birth to a proto-Marxist bankster-bashing son who was simultaneously his own father and who possesses a magical save-game function which restores the sin-health-bars of humans whenever he presses reset on a cross.

That is cool, edgy stuff. But then Christians ruined Christianity and turned it into the worst kind of conformism. Your modern western Christian is just like everyone else, down to its day to day activities, thought processes, wants and desires. Worshiping at the alter of the Invisible Hand, the Holy Market and the self, Christ's believers demote Jesus to a kind of teddy bear, selfishly and periodically rolled out.

We gotta bring back the fire-and-brimstone Big Lebowski Jesus. Drunk stoner hippie-love Picard-in-a-toga Jesus. No other religion has a hero as cool as him, except, arguably, Buddhism.

Someone above mentioned "Devil's Due". This episode seems to present the reverse message of "Devil's Due". In this episode, Orville defends religion as a "stage", a "vital crutch" which helps societies "evolve". Religion as a kind of wisdom laid upon cultures, which helps add structure, guidance and shape, and which helps bootstraps humanity to something more nuanced.

"Devil's Due" offers sort of the same message, but is IMO a bit more critical of religion; religion in "Devil's Due" is more parasitic, it claims victories and achievements which the aliens would have accomplished without its presence, and its demands for payments and fidelity get in the way of, stymie and slow past and future accomplishments.
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Trent
Fri, May 3, 2019, 2:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: The Road Not Taken

Has anyone noticed how this second season bookends itself like season 2 of TOS?

TOS season 1 first episode - Amok Time
Orville season 1 first episode - Ja'loja

TOS season 2 last episode - Assignment Earth
Orville season 2 last episode - The Road Not Taken

Amok Time and Ja'loja see Spock/Bortus being taken back to their home-worlds to enact a rare biological ritual. Assignment Earth and The Road Not Taken deal with time travelers trying to restore time lines and prevent future calamity and war.
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Trent
Fri, May 3, 2019, 2:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow

Watching this episode a second time, knowing where the second installment leads, and I I feel it plays even better. The script's really quite elegant in the way it parcels out information (the way it sets up Ed/Kelly's date taking place right after the temporal teleportation, or the way Young Kelly asks Talla for a date in 7 years time, and Talla immediately looks over at Old Kelly and says "date later in the observation lounge at 8 o clock?" (paraphrase).

This show is also very good at hiding sequences; we have the Orville hiding in 2D space in season 1, and now the Orville hiding in a cloak of ice, and later the (admittedly incredulous) Orville hiding at the edge of a black hole.

This episode also contains a couple great dialogue scenes, Kelly and Kelly passive aggressively trying to get under each other's skin. And I like Ed's politeness and dignity, the way he apologizes for his past transgressions, and Ed and Claire's little talk in her quarters. Barring one or two monologues (mostly about Kelly drunk), the episode's a tight sequence of nicely written little conversations.

Jammer also points out that "Kelly should be locked in a room" so as "not to pervert the timeline", but watching this again, I feel the episode addressed this well. Ed suggests locking Kelly up, but comes to the conclusion that they've branched off into another time line, and that locking her up would be unethical (they yanked her out of time; it's not her fault).

Meanwhile, I feel the climactic ending is the kind of old school scifi ZINGER ENDING! that old scifi short stories (think Asimov and Clarke), and shows like TOS and the Twilight Zone, did really well.
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Trent
Thu, May 2, 2019, 4:08pm (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: The Road Not Taken

Quincy said: "However, ALL detractors arguments against Discovery are ALL applicable here; this episode was flat out absurd."

But Orville's a comedy written by guys who pen Futurama and Family Guy about a crew who smoke weed on duty. Discovery is Star Trek. It's an entirely different show, and a serious one, and one with a much bigger legacy to live up to.

If anyone's interested, Jammer's review reminded me of this Scifi short story: https://www.tor.com/2011/08/31/wikihistory/
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Trent
Sat, Apr 27, 2019, 9:04am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: The Road Not Taken

Slacker said: "no "y" in that word, FYI...[...]...it's ridiculous that Kelly didn't warn anyone about the Kaylon invasion."

It can be spelt with a Y as well (and as two words or one), at least according to dictionary websites.

But that's a great point about Kelly. IMO the only way this "goof" can work is if you assume:

1. Kelly believes that not dating Ed will have no major effect on the universe
2. She believes in non-interference, and the temporal laws cited by Ed, and so doesn't warn the Union
3. She believes events will play out as they did in the Prime Timeline (ie, she lets the war take place, assuming it will be stopped)
4. She wasn't told everything during her trip to the future, so didn't know that Claire only transferred to the Orville because of Ed.
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Trent
Fri, Apr 26, 2019, 9:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: The Road Not Taken

It's funny how this episode highlights the importance of the Claire/Isaac romance.

Kelly's rejection of Ed leads to Ed not serving on the Orville, Isaac never meeting Claire, Claire and the kids never changing Isaac, and Isaac never betraying the Kaylon, who in turn proceed to conquer the Union and Krill.

Far from being a funny diversion, the Claire/Isaac romance from the earlier episodes turns out to be a kind of galactic lynch pin.
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Trent
Fri, Apr 26, 2019, 1:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: The Road Not Taken

I had a big dumb grin on my face throughout this episode. I thought it was goofy fun, like a 15 year old kid's scifi wet dream.

If past Orville episodes suckled on the teats of "Star Trek", this one draws on every pop-SF flick since the 1980s. So we have the "that's no moon" scene from "A New Hope", the asteroid chase from "Empire Strikes Back," the Endor bunker scene from "Return of the Jedi", the "mirror universe" episodes from DS9 and TNG (Yesterday's Enterprise), some underwater stuff evocative of "Stargate Atlantis" or "Seaquest", a Ed/Kelly temporal/trans-dimensional romance similar to Fry/Leela in "Futurama", musical cues from James Cameron's "Aliens", as well as James Horner's work on "Wrath of Khan" and of course John Williams, as well as little tropes evocative of "Firefly", "Serenity", and the resistance movement in the "Terminator" franchise etc.

All of this should be annoying, but the pace is quick and clipped (well structured, the plot unfolds on the move, or as a chase), and the tone always funny. Ed and Gordon risk their lives to steal a "microwave", eat twinkies, the universe is hilariously destroyed because Ed couldn't get a second date ("She never called me back!"), Ed didn't take his shirt off when swimming till he was 20 years old (lol), Gordon thinks Kelly's running a "crack house ship" and Yaphit's a member of an underground rebel cell. We even get Alara back. All that's missing is a funny Dan cameo.

The FX are amazing too, part tacky kitsch, part stunningly beautiful (for every dumb shot of flying robot heads, there are gorgeous shots of the Orville leaving the Atlantic Ocean, or skimming clouds above earth). We also get a cool black hole sequence - our heroes hide at the edge of a black hole - a neat idea which makes absolutely no scientific sense (surely they'd have to constantly have their quantum drive running to negate the hole's pull?).

IMO this episode also works well as a love story; it is revealed that Kelly breaks up with Ed in the last episode not because she resents him and how their lives turned out, but because she wants to protect Ed from emotional pain. It's thus an act of supreme love and altruism which annihilates the universe, the episode making literal the kind of ridiculous hyperbole associated with romance and breakups ("She left me and now the universe sucks!", "Meeting you is the greatest moment of all time!" etc). It's kind of sweet.

It's also worth comparing this to Discovery's climax. Surely the similarities between the two are not a coincidence. Surely Orville learned of Discovery's plot and smuggled in a response, just as it did with "Nothing Left on Earth Excepting Fishes" (undercover Klingons vs undercover Krills- incidentally, there's nothing left on earth, not even fishes, in this episode).

After all, in both shows characters use information from the future to assemble a team and then use time travel to stop high tech robots from taking over the future and annihilating all living things. Both shows also climax with the hero ship using its engines to power a "time crystal"/"time machine", thereby leaving it dead in the water whilst enemy ships close in on its location.

So I found this to be a fun episode; it ably mixes adventure, with tongue-in-cheek comedy, sweet romance, parody, serious stakes, cutting edge CGI and goofy retro-aesthetics. It's a hard juggling act, and probably one which results in the show shooting itself in the foot (Jack of all trades, master of none et al).

As for this season as a whole, IMO it's been very good. I found "Ja'loja" to be a funny, pleasantly low-key relationship episode. "Primal Urges" I found to be weak and too literal with its critiques of pornography. "Home" I felt was a beautiful mood piece. "Nothing Left on Earth Excepting Fishes" I thought had a weak middle, but excellent opening and closing acts. "All the World Is Birthday Cake" I thought was flawed but thematically interesting. Like Jammer I found "A Happy Refrain" incredulous, but was ultimately swayed by its sentimentality. "Deflectors" I thought was excellent, and probably the closet thus far to a great Trek episode, and "Identity Part 1 and 2" I found to be a worthy successor of Trek's best action 2 parters. "Blood of Patriots" I found to be generic, though IMO it had about two great scenes. "Lasting Impression's", like Jammer, I thought was great, with nice themes of tech addiction, love addiction, loneliness and longing. "Sancturary" I thought was excellent as well, and more than most episode this felt like TNG, complete with its moral quagmires and Union HQ debate halls. Taken as a single tale, I thought "Tomorrow, Tomorrow" and "The Road Not Taken" was neat as well, and an interesting tonal juxtaposition (subdued chamber piece vs cataclysmic spectacle).

I hope the show gets at least one more season, and doesn't go the "Firefly" route.

Also if OmicronThetaDeltaPhi is reading this, thanks for inspiring me to rewatch "Enterprise". So far, it's a big improvement (dramatically and aesthetically at least), from the previous seasons. Also, if If OmicronThetaDeltaPhi is reading this, a pre-emptive "**** YOU, MAN!" for making me rewatch Enterprise.
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Trent
Fri, Apr 26, 2019, 6:22am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow

Jammer seems to hate anything to do with Ed and Kelly romancing. Since season 1, he's always seemed to want them to just be colleagues.

I personally like the constant flirting, pining and tension between them, and it plays to Seth's strengths as a lovelorn schmuck. I've always felt this is a direction Chakotay and Janeway should have gone.
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Trent
Thu, Apr 25, 2019, 2:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

If Sarek knows where Michael is and that she's in trouble, why doesn't he send a Vulcan/Federation ship to assist in the battle against Section 31? If Section 31 is jamming communications - I assume it's a huge blockade, given that Discovery can't escape it - how does Ash get a message out to the Klingons?
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Trent
Wed, Apr 24, 2019, 7:24pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

It's the Federation that's Hitlerian now.

In the first Season, the Federation plants a planet destroying bomb in the volcano of Kronos.

In the second Season, the Federation backs and staffs a clandestine organization that creates a weapon that almost destroys all sentient life in the galaxy, and in at least one timeline destroys all sapient life. This is galactic scale genocide.
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Trent
Wed, Apr 24, 2019, 10:26am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

Further to the above, Michael's Mom couldn't have left the Kaminar signal, because she explicitly says in an episode that she has "no idea" about any of the signals. So if Michael is behind all the signals, what we see in the last episode is an error. She couldn't have gone to Kaminar and simultaneously left the signal and helped Saru, because the signal happens about a day earlier.

But this begs another question. Seven simultaneous signals trigger the Discovery's mission. One episode (Brothers) explicitly says this "would have required energy beyond Starfleet's understanding to produce". So how can the Red Angel possesses more energy that Starfleet can produce? And how can it trigger 7 simultaneous signals (" perfect synchronization" the characters say), at different locations?

Spock also tells us he was visited 2 times by the Red Angel, both revealed to have been Dr Burnham. But she doesn't know anything about the red signals. How can Spock draw the seven signals as a kid if no Red Angel gave him this info? And Michael only traveled 5 times back to the past before going in the wormhole, so she couldn't have set the original 7 signals at the beginning of episode 1. So who did?

Finally, the famous "map of 7 signals" shows 7 distinct points, but signal 2 and 7 are both at Terralysium and 5 and 6 are both at Xahea. So the signal map is nonsense; it should only show 3 points.
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Trent
Wed, Apr 24, 2019, 9:53am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

Daya said: "@Trent: She's an angel. She just hung around. "

What does that mean, exactly? You can't hang around in the suit. It automatically yanks you back in time after a few minutes.

The two options seem to be that Michal jumps twice, once to make the signal and once to help Saru. But the show only shows her jumping from the Section 31 battle to Kaminar once.

The other option seems to be that Michael's Mom lays the signal and then Michael shows up to help Saru. But this episode seems to contradict that, as it reveals Michael in the suit laying the signal and helping Saru.
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Trent
Wed, Apr 24, 2019, 6:14am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

Can someone explain this?

According to the show, the signal at Kaminar happened before Discovery arrived. The angel that Saru saw out the window showed up several hours or days after the signal, and disabled all the Ba'ul weapons. This seems inconsistent with this new episode, which shows Michael arriving and creating the signal at Kaminar when Saru was already on the Ba'ul ship.
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