Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:
Clear bookmark | How bookmarks work
Note: Bookmarks are ignored for all search results

Total Found: 16 (Showing 1-16)

Page 1 of 1
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Fri, Jan 18, 2019, 4:25am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Brother

Three stars!

As with the high points of season 1, "Brother" does action adventure better than its television predecessors were ever able to pull off, thanks to a combo of high budget, two decades of CGI improvments, and a longer production time. Less positively, and also like season 1, though, is a lack of thoughtful character moments to elevate the action into something we're truly invested in, instead of just thrilled by.

Tig Notaro was great. Anson Mount is shaping up to be a fantastic Captain (and geez, they are digging themselves a hole by dint of canon - Pike can't be on this show for too long before he has to go back to the Enterprise, and we'll have to adapt to another new leader). Making sure there was a Starfleet science nerd angle to the asteroid chase is also a good sign.

Hopefully, the long-term arc of the season is going to allow for the show to give us more one-off adventures in the classic Star Trek mold and give the characters a bit more time to breathe between spectacular action scenes, moreso than the Klingon/Mirror stuff did last year.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Tue, Jul 24, 2018, 8:21am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S1: If Wishes Were Horses

@Mal - That's an incredibly unfair comment and I suspect you know it. This review of a 1993 episode was written circa 1995 and must be viewed in the context of its era. It's the 11th season of Star Trek in total, rather than the 30th that DSC's debut is. It's before we all had every episode of everything ever streaming on demand via the Internet and thus a lot more training in bad sci-fi tropes. It pre-dates our current age of premium, super high budget TV. Like all good grading systems, it's relative, and two stars is fair in perspective.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 10:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: Solo: A Star Wars Story

@Dom - you may be right, but that still doesn't change my mind that this movie is kinda forgettable. It doesn't feel like it got made because someone had a really great idea for a Han Solo movie, it feels like it got made according to a corporate check list.

Which is not to say that I wasn't entertained for two hours, just that I didn't care about anything that was happening. I prefer a little more ambition in my movies, even standalones.

Since this is a Star Trek site, the original Star Trek movies are a great example of how to do a standalone movie that still manages to take a risk. 2, 3, 4 and 6 all give us episodic stories that still change the status quo in meaningful ways. Characters face consequences for the choices they make, or grow in other ways. This doesn't make them good in of themselves (Generations, for instance, shakes up the status quo but is still a rubbish movie) but it does make them individually memorable. That's what Solo was missing. It felt more like an Insurrection or bad Voyager episode - a completely disposable story that you could easily skip and not fail to understand the next chapter.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Sat, May 26, 2018, 8:52am (UTC -6)
Re: Solo: A Star Wars Story

I agree with the general consensus - it's a serviceable and reasonably entertaining movie, but completely disposable. It offers no new insights into Han's character and, more unforgivably, gives us the ROTJ-harmless-goof version rather than the edgier guy we met in Star Wars, who shot Greedo without a second thought and wanted no part of noble causes.

What we get here is a very safe, family-friendly, dare I say "Disneyfied" Han Solo who doesn't really give the impression of someone who grew up hard in a rough neighbourhood at all. The movie takes no risks at all, in any respect, and thus reaps no rewards either. Say what you will about The Last Jedi - and I change my mind about it every other day - at least it took some risks.

Casting is superb, however. Ehrenreich and Glover both play their parts with gusto. It's a shame their talents couldn't have been put to use in service of something truly memorable.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Feb 12, 2018, 3:50am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Will You Take My Hand?

Two stars. An incredibly rushed conclusion to a badly mishandled war story, albeit with some decent character beats and good performances. Plus I loved the seedy look and feel of the Orion outpost.

Season one as a whole? Three stars. Discovery entertained me more often than not and I enjoyed the willingness of the creative team to push the envelope and give us a new flavour of Star Trek.

However, they badly dropped the ball in two key areas. The most noticeable was how terribly low-stakes the Klingon war felt, and how badly its progress was depicted during the show. It was all over the map, and the idea that a Klingon fleet on Earth's doorstep on the cusp of victory would have pulled out at the drop of a hat is just laughed.

The second was in rushing the finale. Only two episodes back home to wrap up an entire war? Really? Not that I really minded in the end, because I'm happy to just see this plot line deleted entirely. But narratively speaking, they sold themselves short.

Notwithstanding those issues, Discovery's first season was a mostly confidently executed adrenaline rush of batshit insane plotting and some great action adventure moments. It was, however, very thin gruel cerebrally speaking (NBC's infamous memo about The Cage would definitely not have applied here). I am ready for a change in season two. I don't want to return to an entirely stand-alone-episode mode of storytelling - The Orville has ably demonstrated just how dry that well is - but something more akin to Enterprise's fourth season, or for a more recent example, Agents of SHIELD's fourth season, with a few smaller arcs, would be ideal.

I can't wait to see all the bitter commenters who obviously despise the show come back to tell us how much they hate it! See you next year, you angry, angry Internet nerds.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Feb 5, 2018, 3:14am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The War Without, The War Within

2.5 stars. I miss Jason Isaacs and the intensity he brought to the show. None of the other actors feel commanding in the same way he pulled off, although Michelle Yeoh comes closest, and we're obviously not allowed to keep her forever.

Aside from that, it was nice to be back in the Prime, although as soon as a time jump to a dire future is introduced, we know what's coming, don't we! A good old-fashioned Star Trek Reset Button™. The last time I recall that getting a good push was the ENT season four opener when the Temporal Cold War was deleted from the canon (and good riddance). Here's hoping DSC will similarly use the opportunity to excise elements of the show that haven't clicked.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Jan 29, 2018, 3:18am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: What's Past Is Prologue

A solid three stars here I think. DSC is selling the action-adventure side of Star Trek better than any of its progenitors, and the furious storytelling pace always keeps me interested. This was a fine, exciting conclusion to the Mirror Universe arc. But man, am I disappointed to be back with the bloody Klingon war. It's way less interesting than this Mirror Universe storyline was, and without Lorca there as the devil on the shoulder of the Discovery crew I feel it's going to lose even more interest.

Speaking of which, BOO to losing Jason Isaacs. I was really hoping we were going to get some switcheroo shenanigans, and find the Prime Lorca somewhere along the way. Instead he appears to have just been deleted from the show, and although you never say never in sci-fi this seemed pretty definitive. And with that, we lose the strongest actor in the ensemble. I sincerely hope we get him back in the captain's chair. If they make Burnham captain I will scream. Not because I don't like her, but because it would be utterly ridiculous from a story perspective.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Jan 22, 2018, 4:01am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Vaulting Ambition

A perfectly watchable episode, although the only real high point is Michelle Yeoh's stellar turn as Evil Georgiou. The rest is all table-setting for the end game of the season, and as far as that goes it was all serviceable. This is the problem with heavily serialised shows, even the best ones like Game Of Thrones - you've got to eat your vegetables before you can get to the meat.

The confirmation of Lorca actually being Evil Lorca was well-done, I thought, and explains a lot of his earlier decisions and motivations. It also poses an interesting question: does winning a war *require* throwing aside Federation ideals? It's arguable, for instance, that the Dominion War wouldn't have been won without Section 31. And Evil Lorca's constant pushing of the Discovery crew to fight harder, along with morally questionable calls like the way he ordered experiments on the tardigrade, might be what got the Federation over the line in this Klingon fight - provided they ever get that cloak-busting algorithm back to Starfleet.

Food for thought.

Oh, and @Frederick Lang... just because I love a classic Internet argument, here's my ranking of Trek captains:

6) Lorca
5) Archer
4) Sisko
3) Picard
2) Janeway
1) Kirk
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Jan 15, 2018, 5:50am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Wolf Inside

@Aidan

Man, just go over Jammer's reviews from ENT's first two seasons and remind yourself. It did an okay job of treading water in its first season before absolutely cratering in the second. Berman and Braga had a very good crack at pulling out of the nose dive in season three, and Coto finally showed us what the show should have been all along in season four, but by that point the damage had been done.

To my mind, DSC is doing a bang-up job of showing what a long-form, modern Trek can be. It's not perfect, but it does feel fresh in a way that later-entry Berman-era Trek utterly lacked. I wish the the fans complaining about DSC today would cast their minds back to just how angry we all were with the franchise's refusal to take any storytelling risks after DS9 ended.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Jan 15, 2018, 3:52am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Wolf Inside

As far as how the different shows have handled the Mirror Universe, DSC has so far done it the best. Partly it's because the serialised nature of DSC allows them to really go deep on the psychological aspects of this undercover mission, and partly it's because the show's already darker tone really helps to sell the scariness and tension of such an extreme kill-or-be-killed environment. ENT just went for pure fan service after DS9 thoroughly drove the concept into the ground (my, how hard a fall it was from "Crossover" to "The Emperor's New Cloak"!), and TOS just had fun with a bizarre sci-fi concept - although Kirk's final speech to Spock is one of the original templates for the classic Captain's Preach that DSC still sadly hasn't really given us.

Despite some logic gaps (would a Cadet really be allowed to monkey with someone's brain like that without at least *some* medical supervision??) it kept up the pace and left me eager to see how this plays out. I'm so pleased to have Star Trek back! And a Star Trek that is trying something new, to boot. After such an ignominious end to the TV franchise with ENT's slow death it's nice that the new powers that be didn't go The Orville/ENT/VOY route of just serving up reheated TNG leftovers.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Jan 8, 2018, 4:16am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Despite Yourself

@MadManMUC

I hope you're right too. I honestly don't mind the visual updates that DSC has done - a 1960's aesthetic to the interior sets and technology would look very silly in 2017 - but the look of the original Constitution class is as iconic an image as Star Trek has. I really wouldn't want it to be altered just for the sake of modernity. It just doesn't feel necessary, especially when ENT demonstrated just how impressive that design can look when filmed without the limitations of a 60's studio model setup.
Set Bookmark
Tim C
Mon, Jan 8, 2018, 3:38am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Despite Yourself

All these comments, and nobody has yet noted the subtle redesign of the Constitution class?! When they're looking at the diagram of the Defiant, it's not the classic 1960's Connie that we know and love - the nacelle pylons have angles, the deflector looks weird etc. I'm not sure how I feel about that. On the one hand I've been happy to defend DSC not trying to recreate a 1960's TV set, despite their closeness to the TOS timeline. On the other hand, the original Connie is a goddamn iconic ship, *and* it was also shown in ENT looking exactly the same!

I quite enjoyed this episode - especially Captain Killey! - but please, please, please, if they do actually get to the Defiant, please keep the exterior. Update the interior if you must, but don't fuck with those classic lines! ENT demonstrated quite handily that it doesn't need to be altered to fit in alongside other ships - it looked right at home on TV in 2004.
Set Bookmark
Tim Carroll
Sat, Feb 28, 2009, 6:47pm (UTC -6)
Re: BSG S4: Deadlock

I didn't enjoy this episode as much as others from the season, but one thing that actually did ring true for me was Ellen's almost-immediate reversion on seeing Tigh again. If there's one thing we've learned about those two over the years, it's that their relationship is utterly, utterly toxic to both of them. They're madly in love, but it also drives them both - especially Ellen - to be incredibly jealous and petty in matters concerning each other.

Remove Tigh from Ellen's life, and New Ellen that we saw last week comes to the fore. Bring them back together, and she quickly becomes Old Ellen again.
Set Bookmark
Tim Carroll
Wed, Sep 3, 2008, 8:20am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Nemesis

Watched this one today, for the first time since I saw it at the movies. Age hasn't improved it any, although at least it no longer carries with it the crushingly bitter disappointment in Trek's creative forces that I'd guess most of us fans were going through at the time.

Remember what it was like? Enterprise's *horrendous* second season had just shuffled zombie-like into hiatus, leaving us all feeling empty and unmoved. The foul stench of moldy, past their use-by-date plots still lingered, but there was a small ray of hope in "The Expanse" that the show might finally turn the corner.

Then THIS piece of garbage came out, and you realised that Star Trek was going to die very soon, regardless of how well Enterprise's third season turned out. Not because it was a *bad* movie; because it was a hideously *mediocre* movie that embodied your worst fears about the state of the franchise: Star Trek was brain-dead, a walking corpse, the living dead... and nothing short of a LONG hiatus and a complete creative refresh would save it.

It was like a punch in the face, really (even though "These Are The Voyages..." would put it to shame soon thereafter). Bad time to be a Trek fan.

I think that's part of why it got such a bad reaction from fans - Trek was in bad shape at the time and when TPTB could have fixed things with a great TNG movie, they blew it and consequently all our hopes away.
Set Bookmark
Tim Carroll
Fri, Aug 29, 2008, 9:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: First Contact

People often point to Voyager as the beginning of the end for the Borg as credible villains, but I've always felt it was this movie that turned the Borg from a genuinely menacing threat into something far less interesting. All Voyager did was run with the concept originally created here. Only problem was, it was never a good idea to begin with.

In fact, the Borg Queen was the Worst. Idea. Ever. The reason the Borg were so uniquely frightening to begin with was that there were *no* leaders of the Collective. It just existed, mindlessly carrying out its endless quest to reach perfection. They were the ultimate Trek Evil Computer(TM) villain.

The Borg Queen ruined all that. Suddenly, the Borg had an individual leader who made independent decisions and had emotions and all that jazz, and ALL that mystique went POOF and was never regained.

Voyager's "Scorpion" was the last time the Borg felt scary. It's also the last time we had a Borg Special (TM) without the fucking Queen. Coincidence? I think not...
Set Bookmark
Tim Carroll
Fri, Aug 29, 2008, 6:04am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

My favourite in the series, although it's a *very* close tie with TWOK. Reason being that although TWOK is the definitive Trek movie, TUC gave us that most rare of all gems in the Trek canon: a dignified end. Trek has historically had problems in delivering satisfying payoffs to its bigger stories, no matter which part of the franchise you look at. (Even DS9 - bless its dark little soul - couldn't deliver a satisfactory resolution to its longest-running tale. Namely, Sisko's "destiny". Which as it turned out, was to push a guy and a book off a cliff. Wow.)

TUC gave the TOS characters a beautiful sentimental send-off, wrapped up in an exciting, fast-past plot. Even though it doesn't hold up to close scrutiny quite as well as TWOK, it's forgiven by the fact that this is *it*. The last adventure. There's a pervasive sense of finality throughout the film, and the closing "goodbye photo" and log entry where Kirk hands off to TNG is note-perfect.

Final chapters as good as this are a rare thing. A four-star outing for me, easily.
Page 1 of 1
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2019 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.