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TheTruthFirst
Wed, Dec 16, 2020, 10:04pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: Terra Firma, Part 1

Star Trek has a very poor record when it comes to its relationship with the African people. But it can be acknowledged that it has made some effort here to correct those wrongs.

Africa is the birthplace of human civilization and for thousands of years Egypt was the crown jewel of humanity. The African man created knowledge and written language. He charted the stars and he explored the world. He built the pyramids and developed medicines and mathematics.

The ancient Africans were the most advanced and spiritual people in the history of the Earth. They created wonder after wonder, such as the pyramids, great temples and cities, science, medicine and the language of hieroglyphs. But how did they attain such inner and outer brilliance?

The ancient Africans were direct descendents of the beings who traveled through the stars and found Earth. Many of these beings are referred to as Gods.

For example, in African mythology Nut (also known as Newet, and Neuth), was the goddess of the sky. Her name translated to mean night was the guardian of the Moon. Nut was said to be covered in stars touching the cardinal points of her body. Her headdress was the hieroglyphic of part of her name, a pot, which may also symbolize the uterus. The ancient Egyptians themselves said that every woman was a nutrit, a little goddess.

Nut and the other Gods taught the original Africans the ways of the universe. They traveled to the stars and often visited the Moon in order to study the Earth from space. From the Moon, these Africans were able to create highly detailed maps of the Earth which enabled them to explore the world by sail.

Star Trek has an obligation to tell the FULL truth, not partial truth.
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