Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:
Clear bookmark | How bookmarks work
Note: Bookmarks are ignored for all search results

Total Found: 140 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 6
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Aug 8, 2019, 1:09am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: The Vengeance Factor

The ending with Yuta being killed:

I choose to view this in the metaphorical/messaging way... otherwise it's too disturbing and even extra sad.

In terms of the messaging, I think I get it. Yuta was set on vengeance, obsessed even and drive in this singular direction - and I actually feel a lot of sympathy for her and get it and maybe many of us might do the same thing in her position if our entire family, community, peoples were eradicated from the face of the Earth for all time - but the messaging at the end seems to be that she was making a choice, or she just couldn't back away from it after all this time, and all that. And even though Riker was torn up about it, he did what he thought was right - I think this is sort of the messaging. But at any rate, I think this must have been written with messaging in mind.

Because when it comes to literal... it makes no sense. There are many people on the ship, they could have restrained her. If her weapon is genetically specific to the person she was aiming to kill, then the others' lives would not be at risk. The brandy seems to just be brandy, as the others are drinking it. There is no mention of her having super strength or a different weapon or anything. I don't see why Riker and others, even Captain Picard could have gotten up and restrained her. It felt wrong watching as Picard and others just stood there watching as someone was killed, and it felt horrible to see Riker kill her, and it occurred over a long enough period of time where someone could have easily gotten up. And as others have mentioned, maybe keep stunning her. Maybe beam her off the ship if that's an option. Perhaps someone could have pulled the potential victim away. Etc etc.

So if we watch this in the literal sense - or whatever the word is - I think it's too disturbing, it just doesn't really add up. But if we watch it in the metaphorical/messaging sense, okay I get it.

It's really sad that Yuta died.
Set Bookmark
James Smith
Thu, Apr 25, 2019, 7:12am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

@Paul - people keep saying that the first two seasons of TNG were awful, as if every episode in those two seasons was. I genuinely don't think that's the case. Yes, there was some rubbish - some of it offensively bad ('Code Of Honor', 'When The Bough Breaks', 'Shades Of Gray'...). But there were stand-out episodes as well - '11001001', 'Heart Of Glory', 'Arsenal Of Freedom', 'The Measure Of A Man', 'Q Who'.

So far, in two seasons STD has produced *one* good episode of Star Trek IMO. 'An Obol For Charon' was a genuinely good Trek story fighting to get out from underneath STD. I'm sort-of amazed at how little praise that episode generates. But then maybe not, because it's emblematic of how far away my impression of STD has been compared with others. Jammer rates this episode three stars for example - I'd give it one for the VFX, half for Anson Mount doing his best with the material, and zero for quite literally everything else about it. Plot points that make no sense, scenes where characters stand around talking for ages when time really would be of the essence, SMG sliding into an abyss of poor acting choices (she really can only do one face even vaguely well, that wide-eyed look of panic)...

And the cop-out ending, desperately trying to claim that canon is now sorted because they just won't talk about the ship or crew ever again in continuity. Well I'm sorry but *fuck* whoever wrote that and thought 'yeah, that will do'. If that's any indication of how poor the writing in this series is going to continue to be then I'm out.
Set Bookmark
James Smith
Sat, Apr 20, 2019, 8:54am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

So, what did the Star Trek universe get out of the 29 episodes of STD so far? Did anything have any lasting consequence? The USS DiscoBall and spore drive are gone. So are the sphere data. A bunch of people have disappeared and aren't going to be talked about ever again. The Klingon war made it almost to Earth, before stopping and there seemingly being few repercussions or lasting effects from it.

So, with the greatest possible respect to all involved, WHAT WAS IT ALL EVEN FOR?!?!?! And what d'you suppose was the plan to get STD to sync up with canon *before* they wrote this sprawling mess of fairly epic VFX set pieces linked with clunky dialogue? Was there ever a plan to do so? Were they always going to shoot the DiscoBall into the future?

Because if so, if going to the 33rd century was always the plan...*WHY NOT ****ING WELL START THERE?*
Set Bookmark
Dan Smith
Fri, Feb 1, 2019, 6:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: The Conscience of the King

It's ambitious, I'll give it that. But I had a hard time going along with some of the key dilemmas that the plot wants me to ponder:

- Kirk is a key witness in a murder, but the Enterprise has places to be and can't stick around. Same for the actors. Investigating the murder requires manufacturing a pretense.

- Kirk has some serious suspicions, but he can't talk about them with anyone (friends, police, security personnel). This is a personal matter.

- Kodos committed the murder of thousands of innocent people (numbers on par with the recent ISIS genocides of Yazidis and Shias), and is apparently responsible for a string of recent murders, but investigating him is kind of mean and vengeful. It was 20 years ago, after all.

- After some brief romantic interactions with a teenage girl (*cough*problematic*cough*), Kirk is personally invested in her happiness, and conflicted about whether to cause harm to her father.

It might have worked if everything wasn't so hyperbolic? Like, maybe make Kodos responsible for some white collar crimes, and Kirk and Lenore childhood friends?
Set Bookmark
Tim Smith
Mon, Dec 10, 2018, 4:01pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Friendship One

Regarding Janeway’s final statement that “exploration is not worth millions of lives - or just one.” :

I think Janeway means ‘not worth one life OTHER than those of the explorers themselves’ (since they volunteered to accept the risks).

So the Space Shuttle Columbia breaking up and killing all 7 crew members is not a reason to stop human spaceflight.

But the Space Shuttle Columbia breaking up and killing all 7 crew members PLUS an innocent member of the public (imagine a large piece of wreckage fell on someone) would be a reason to stop.

Not that I agree with the premise myself. People die in accidents every day around the world.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Sun, Dec 9, 2018, 8:04am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Let He Who Is Without Sin...

Not a great episode, but not an awful episode. The relationship banter was formulaic and boring (like most trek relationships). But what did have potential was the "essentialists". If more emphasis was put on them (symbolic of religions fundamentalist/evangelist) this could have been a great show. Something else that would have helped would have been focus on the weather control system its problems. Can you imagine if we had a weather control system today...how many lawsuits and complaints people would have at the slightest of problems?
Set Bookmark
Aaron Smith
Mon, Dec 3, 2018, 7:48am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Sword of Kahless

Starts out as a good adventure story, but then devolves into boring quibbling between the crew. With better editing and a b-plot for filler this could have been a great episode.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Sat, Dec 1, 2018, 8:06am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

Not to be a contrarian but I couldn't stand this episode and it is among the worst IMO. The music was excellent as was the camera work, but... The pacing, dialog and energy were very bad. The two guest stars were flat, two-dimensional and talked waaay to slow. The main story was simplistic and backwards looking. Roddenberry trek is about discovery and new ideas...this was emotional indulgence that put character egos ahead of good story. I'm somewhat stunned that this is so popular of an episode.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 6:19pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: Cardassians

Despite good efforts by both the Dukat and Garek actors, this was a weak episode. The kid hated cardassians. That's it. That was his entire personality. Watching such an artificially simplistic character was tough.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 6:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: Invasive Procedures

A bit too simplistic. This felt like a cost saving budget effort that didn't work for me. It started good with the take-over, but after that dragged on with one-dimensional story telling. It was pretty much a stranger stealing the symbiont and getting recaptured. No clever twists or interesting details. Also too much boring reminiscing between Sisko and Dax.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 6:09pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: The Circle

The strongest of the three episodes. This finally picked up the pacing which was a serous problem in the prior two episodes.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 6:07pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: In the Hands of the Prophets

The school storyline was good and Winn was a great character who was well acted. Everything outside of that was pretty boring though.

There is too much of an emphasis on bajorans in this episode. Everything about them from their religion, to their politics, to their obsessions over victimhood and the past was boring and uninteresting.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 6:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Duet

This episode had some fun twists with the overall story, but the dialog and acting was weak. Too one-dimensional, melodramatic, and backwards looking. Despite some efforts by Marritza, this was a black and white episodes with the Bajorans being simplistic good guys and the cardassians simplistic bad guys.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 5:56pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Progress

By far and away, the worst episode ever of DS9. The pacing was horrendous and and the dialog simplistic. Why did the producers think that constructing a kiln and tenderizing roots would make for an entertaining episode? Also sacrificing an inhabitable moon just to heat a few hundred thousand homes in the winter doesn't seem very efficient.

This story could have been saved by some twists. Perhaps the core-tapping project was a boon-doggle that would end up failing and exposing greedy interests that pushed it.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 5:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Emissary

A mediocre episode. The wormhole mystery was fun, but Sisko constantly obsessing about the past and his dead wife was annoying and uninteresting. Good episodes look forwards...not backwards.
Set Bookmark
James Smith
Mon, Feb 12, 2018, 6:08am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Will You Take My Hand?

*sigh*

So, we've got Burnham as a full-on Mary Sue. The one true saviour of the Federation's moral code. We've got the whole war arc essentially resolved instantly by handing control of a Big F***ing Bomb™ to one of the enemy. We've got MU Georgiou still in play somewhere for no good reason. And then they cap the episode by showing something that's referred to as the Enterprise but it sure don't look like the Enterprise...

Nope. Sorry. This whole season has been one mis-step after another, and now it's fallen over entirely and faceplanted the ground.
Set Bookmark
James Smith
Mon, Sep 25, 2017, 4:02am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: The Vulcan Hello / Battle at the Binary Stars

I tried to like it. I really did. I can deal with the JJ-Trek set design, I figured I could rationalise the Klingon makeup change, I even decided I could live with the ship designs being a) out of place and b) extremely ugly.

But I can't get past the fact that I don't like very many of the characters presented so far, especially Michael Burnham. This isn't a bash on the actress - Sonequa Martin-Green is great, but Burnham is monumentally bone-headed.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Wed, May 24, 2017, 2:53pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

A lot of good points brought up about the show.

I would venture to say there is little continuity in Star Trek in general - most shows reset during the next episode with previous events/circumstances rarely brought up later in the series. I've also always had the impression that these episodes were written and spit out quickly under tight time constraints, so that there simply wasn't much time to sit around and think about the past history of characters (and Star Trek history) and how that would play into the present situation.

And of course, the show's entertainment value always trumps logical script-writing as well as any kind of scientific accuracy. That's television.

I would have to disagree that Jellico had an initial 'disdain for Riker'. From the moment he beamed on board, he seemed genuinely excited to work with Riker and the entire crew. It wasn't until he found out that Riker had neglected to carry out a specific request that his entire demeanor changed.

The conflict really seemed to surround the idea that it was Jellico's job to come onboard and immediately start preparing the ship in every possible way for combat. Rather than having outright disdain for anyone, he expected to have every order/request carried out without question, and immediately labeled someone as hostile if they showed any resistance. This may have been a failing on his part, having worked with diffiulct crews in the past during temporary missions, and transposing that hostility onto Riker for simply wanting to discuss the situation with him.

More than anything, it seemed he was expecting that, of all the crews he'd worked with, the flagship would be the easiest, full of top-notch officers who are ready to go above and beyond. When this does not occur (at least not up to his standards), that's when his disappointment begins.

Additionally, the attitudes of the crew certainly got to him as well. For example, rather than complaining and being outraged by the workload, if Geordi had said "Yes sir, I'll get right on that and do the best I possibly can to finish it in time", Jellico probably wouldn't have even cared if the job took longer than scheduled, as long as he knew that the crew had a great attitude and wanted to work hard.

This was why he immediately took so well to Data, and had him follow his run around the ship. It wasn't in Data's nature to complain, and instead simply calculate things coldly (like how long a job takes) without emotion or personal grievances.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Fri, Apr 28, 2017, 8:24pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Game

I always liked the obvious implications of "The Game" in modern society......just look around, everyone desperately staring at their smartphones, addicted to the quick highs and instant gratification of texting and games.

The problem with "The Game" is that they should have introduced it much more slowly, just like smartphones, so that by the time people caught on to what was occurring it had already overtaken society's social norms. At that point, it's not only built into the culture but also a 'social status' symbol, because heaven forbid someone catches you NOT looking at your phone and thinks you're unpopular.

Thanks for finally saying it out loud, Outsider65. I think the turbo lift scene basically told us exactly what the game gives people for completing higher levels and giving up control of their own mind. In that sense, it is actually a pretty bizarre scene when Beverly wants her own son to partake of the device.

What I always enjoyed about the episode was Wesley's brilliant play at misdirection, meaning that the entire chase sequence was simply done to give Data enough time to study the device and come up with a cure. I thought this was well written, particularly when it came to Data's entrance onto the bridge when it seemed Wesley was the only normal one left onboard.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Thu, Apr 13, 2017, 2:47pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

I would say that on an officer level, they are usually transferred sideways to another unit after a promotion, usually because they need to fill a spot open, not because they're afraid of running a unit that they used to be a part of.

On the enlisted side, you run into those problems all the time. You have corporals who become sergeants and are now in charge of people they used to go drink with on the weekends, which is a major problem, and why fraternization has become increasingly against the rules in the modern military.

I agree with your take on the episode - Basically Jellico had high hopes for his tour with the flagship, and you could see the huge disappointment when he realized that certain members of the crew were in fact fighting him as opposed to helping him achieve his battle-ready goals.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Wed, Dec 14, 2016, 2:18pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

Great points, Flying Squirrel.

Honestly, I don't actually know what modality Starfleet is actually supposed to represent. At one point during DS9 "Homefront", we actually get the notion for the first time that the Federation/Starfleet are two different entities, one representing the government, and the other representing the actual space-bearing military structure.

So I really cannot argue with your idea of a hybrid culture, since we are never presented with a solid foundation of what Starfleet actually represents in its entirety.

Riker is used to having Picard's ear and talking candidly - Now suddenly he gets "I don't want to talk about it, get it done" - It's a drastic change, but these are supposedly battle-ready officers who should be ready to adapt to any command style.

I realize you have to have drama in any given episode, but in reality it just doesn't make since for the crew to show that much resistance to a new command style - and they aren't being told to work their ass off simply out of a difference of style, it is all in preparation for a potential battle, which I would think they would all be on board with.

There is purpose behind everything Jellico is requesting - it's NOT just him being an a-hole.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Tue, Dec 13, 2016, 6:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

I agree, there really was no reason for Riker to NOT be acting captain.

But at the same time, I was never really in agreement with how butt-hurt the crew was with a new Captain who happens to like things at a faster pace. Jellico was a war officer, who knows how to prepare for battle and is not obsessed with the 'pleasantries' that go along with a peace-based mission.

The crew was taken off guard, because they were used to a more lackadaisical command style from Picard. Boo-hoo, Troi has to wear an official uniform instead of one that shows off her cleavage.

Of course, I actually have military experience, and know what it's like to have the commanding officer interchanged with another, which happens every two years, and with which there is no going back. You either deal with it, or you will have serious problems.

Of course, you'll get no argument from me that the entire episode was bogus. Picard went on a mission, with the support of the stupid bimbo female admiral Nechayev , in which he was sent with the full knowledge and planning of the Cardassian empire. I'm sure in a Federation of 20 billion humans and one can only guess how many alien races, there were probably at least a thousand others familiar with Theta waves who could have gone on the mission instead. Joke.

The episode's main premise seamed devoted to the drama aspect of having a new captain, not providing an actual legitimate reason for Picard to leave the Enterprise.

But who cares......I enjoyed watching Jellico say basically "Stop complaining, get it done" over and over again.
Set Bookmark
Smith
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 4:58am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

That was Nova squadron's punishment right out of the gate.....doors that don't automatically open....
Set Bookmark
Smith
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 10:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: The Pegasus

Thanks, Chrome.

I'm still not sure if the trade off was worth it - Suffering through 2 hours of a boring, non-sensical script that was an insult to all things TNG just to gain technology already commonplace?

Hell, Janeway already brought them back transphasic torpedoes and armor hull plating before Nemesis even occurred, so that should have been the bigger breakthrough.

Who cares about cloaking with you have an armor hull that no current species in the alpha quadrant can shoot through (except maybe the Sheliak).
Set Bookmark
Smith
Sat, Dec 3, 2016, 2:12pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: The Pegasus

What did the Romulans give up in the treaty?

They promised not to make a crappy movie with a bogus script about a boring clone who looks nothing like Picard, and a band of (somewhat) Romulan misfits who have no reason to be angry at the Federation at all.

Unfortuantely, in 2002 they broke the treaty and the movie got made.

Conclusion: Starfleet can now use cloaking technology whenever they want.
Next ►Page 1 of 6
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2019 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.