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SPOCKED
Sat, Apr 26, 2014, 2:11pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: Requiem for Methuselah

Alternative episode title: Kirk's Got The Feevah! Who wouldn't..? Louise Sorel as Rayna, is absolutely stunning in her, snug, aluminous dress. But how out of character does Kirk seem, here? Quite clearly, and for less than noble reasons, our virile captain wants to be, ahem, in like Flint. Of the many times I saw this episode years and years ago (edited 70's era butchered airings) - though I understood she was an android I have no memory of the scene where Kirk reveals that unfortunate reality... Rayna is just one of many copies. By the way... Data (whose Lal and pre-Lal units had nothing on Rayna) wouldn't even need an emotion chip to experience some serious human envy - Flint's version is THAT impressive. The episode expects us to believe that in the short time between cold sonic showers, Kirk has fallen so deeply in love that he's willing to beat up a creepy, one thousand year old man - who once could have been Hercules. Did not Kirk witness Hercules' power to shrink a thirty foot film production Enterprise into a twelve inch AMT model?? - and freezing Scotty solid in the process? Ultimately, the landing party's visit to Holberg 917-G (weird name if you ask me) in search of an antidote results in the death of everyone on the planet (Da Vinci, Brahms, Alexander, et al) - probably a TOS "first." Not a first is James T. Kirk's innate ability of forcing a robot into suicide. Spock's use, at the end, of a sort of katra reset button was sweet... he probably thought it was only appropriate what with all the suffering Kirk went through after he murdered Edith Keeler with a Packard.
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SPOCKED
Sat, Apr 26, 2014, 10:52am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: Spock's Brain

Awful, yet charming. Cheesy, but certainly not without some tasty bits. I can't help chuckling over a (arguably more fitting) "robot Spock reaches Kara's wristband scene" where Kirk has our brainless Vulcan repeatedly bumping into walls and crashing into furniture for over an hour before finally reaching her. And why in the world was Spock's actual brain never shown? Imagine the impact had they suspended it in a clear bucket of green biogel with a couple of sparking FIOS leads attached? Oh well. For some of us it is way too late to rate 'Spock's Brain' a clunker... there are too many decades between the boy who treasured it and the man who enjoys living on the M-class planet of denial where all TOS is concerned. Perhaps someone should take a sonic separator to MY brain.
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SPOCKED
Sun, Oct 6, 2013, 7:55am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

My memory of opening day: I was in line for the first show on opening day in Groton, Ct. for TWOK. I remember by the time we arrived any hopes of being first in line were quickly dashed hours before showtime. It was a beautiful sunny afternoon and there was a sort of "party" atmosphere which just made the long wait a lot less tedious. As far back as we were, any ability to judge the actual length of the line became impossible (later in the summer I returned for another viewing and found myself at the end of a line that stretched around the side of the building). At some point, when the theater realized they had enough people in line for every scheduled showing, someone came out and asked if we wouldn't mind if they started the first movie immediately... and the massive audience, already in a good mood, roared its approval. Soon after, the line started moving and I was very happy to find that my pals and I had still arrived early enough to make it into the first audience. At 23 years of age and a life long fan of the series, all I knew going into TWOK was that Ricardo Mantalban was reprising his role as Khan, a character from Space Seed I knew very well. My point being, of course, the comparative lack of forehand knowledge and storyline detail. I hadn't even seen a television trailer, if there were any, before arriving. I wasn't "spoiled," in other words. Indeed, I got my first close up look at the movie poster inside the lobby with its few bits of story elements which were just enough to whet my appetite for what was to become the audience participation and movie experience of a lifetime.
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