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Ruth
Thu, Dec 14, 2017, 8:36pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Favorite Son

This episode is terrible, but it’s also a heavy inspiration for Mass Effect. It’s clearly this episode that gave them the idea for the Asari, from the female only/mainly female species, preferring but not necessarily needing alien DNA to procreate, the head spots and the name (though they’re named after the enemies of the Taresians, the Nasari). It’s very blatant and it makes me laugh. Of all the Star Trek episodes to use for your pseudo Trek game, I ask you!

There are some interesting parts like B’Elanna nearly dying and Harry’s guilt, or Tom’s mix of worry and jealousy on the planet, but they don’t go into it enough. They don’t even go into why the Nasari fire without warning on detection of an infected alien - clearly because as neighbours of the Taresians they are or at least feel especially threatened by their vampiric activities. I don’t mind reading into an episode, I wouldn’t come and read these reviews and comments if I didn’t enjoy it, but this one is just so thin. You pretty much have to read all of it in, apart from maybe the Janeway-mum stuff.
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Ruth
Wed, Dec 13, 2017, 8:11am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Rise

Sklar you need to pay more attention. For example in your own handpicked quotes it says that launching would kill the people in the cavern, which is why they’re panicking so much, but once they’re inside Neelix thinks the carriage will be okay but the launch cavern will be destroyed. No contradiction, no plot hole. And about the poison - they are establishing that the poison is available here but that it wasn’t accidental poisoning. You can get the poison, but it has to be on purpose because it’s a sealed system. So it’s murder not an accident.

That Tuvok apparently doesn’t care that there’s a murderer inside with them is a plot hole. The rest isn’t.

I don’t know how some people miss the point so badly. Saying space elevators is a stupid idea when it’s a real idea and feasible in Star Trek world. Whinging about shuttles (now more than when Jammer wrote his reviews - there are two entire episodes later dedicated to how voyager can not only build but design its own shuttles which he didn’t have, though I think with all the episodes about getting materials for the ship combined with them not really caring about lost shuttles it would have been possible to guess anyway). Saying they don’t understand the murderer’s motives and that that’s a problem with the plot and not their attention. Come on!

There are real problems with Voyager sometimes and this plot has a big one in Tuvok the starfleet officer with his duty to the truth, Tuvok the mystery solver who is completely distressed if he doesn’t have all the answers to a murder even if others would consider it solved, apparently no longer caring about a murder in front of him. On the mission he takes great pains to point out he’s in charge of. That’s a real genuine honest to god plot hole, one that detracts from the episode.

Beaming up in a fight is a plot hole too but not a significant one. I often think American television really suffers from adverts. I assume this was shown in an hour slot and if they’d had that full hour for each episode they would have been a lot better. But that’s how it is. So the first parts are often paced well and then they really squeeze the ending in. It’s not good but I think it’s better than either rushing the whole thing or giving us less story. There are plenty of logical explanations for how they and Neelix got back on the ship and his concussion was at least stabilised, but it was weird that we so conspicuously didn’t even see a hint of any of them. But I don’t call that a serious plot hole because it’s a minor plot point.

I like this episode for the Tuvok/Neelix relationship development and the insights into Neelix. That’s the point of the episode and I think they did it well. I also think the ideas of the failing rickety space elevator, the murder in a closed space, the aliens who use both cunning and force to steal planets, they’re all good ideas and at least felt fresh for Star Trek even if they’re not. I’d give this 3 out of 4 easily
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Ruth
Mon, Dec 11, 2017, 6:19am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Coda

This episode doesn’t show anything about the afterlife. It shows a very stubborn dying woman fighting against her death with encouragement from the man who would be her husband if not for circumstances, her best friend who has extremely good mental discipline, and a doctor who is not only very skilled but very innovative. And it also shows an alien trying to eat her life force.

If the alien could eat souls, if souls were real, there’s no rush. Though Janeway is confused by his actions and because she’s dying, she does realise eventually that if this were in any way real he doesn’t need to rush her. Even by his own lies he said he watched her and her family for months, so why can’t she do the same? She’s no idiot so she notices his lies but she’s too weak and confused to see them head on until the very end. That happens all the way through.

I love this episode. Tuvok’s obvious desperation, B’Elanna’s speech, Harry’s speech and both of them weeping 😭 I do think it cheapens it a bit that none of that was real, but i think we’re supposed to think that this is what they would do if it were real and I buy it. Interestingly Chakotay is more heartbroken in the real parts than the imagined parts. It’s not clear because of what she says about seeing things from outside being hallucinations but when he’s sobbing and Voyager will be there in a few mins, I think that one’s actually real, because that actually happened - Voyager really was on its way, Tuvok really did come and help very quickly.

I like the insights into Janeway too. That she was bed bound with depression for months 15 years ago is particularly interesting especially in light of later episodes where you see she does still have this tendency toward depression. And I like that if she really did become a ghost she’d stay with her crew.
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Ruth
Mon, Dec 11, 2017, 5:18am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Warlord

Skimbles you need to watch again. They absolutely put Tieran in Kes’ quarters. I can’t remember if Kes is ever in his throne room but he is absolutely in her quarters at one point.

Also Tuvok didn’t beam into the throne room! They were discussing a nearby place to launch an assault from - so obviously the palace was shielded. It was a big deal for Tieran to use Kes’ power to sense Tuvok, but any idiot would have seen him just materialise! That’s why they didn’t beam him out. They discussed the shield and Tieran even spoke to them about it and its weakness.

The necessity of the implants for the device to work is a genuine plot hole but one I didn’t notice when watching. It makes sense that it just forces Tieran out and that if he’s able he’ll use his implants to force himself into someone else. As it works fine without the line about the implants I wonder why they included it. It would have made more sense to wonder things like: might he have left her body already? If so, will she still be alive?
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Ruth
Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 9:18pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Sacred Ground

I think it’s odd to see this as a science vs religion episode. At several points it’s made clear that neither Janeway nor the spirits/elders see that as a meaningful distinction. The guide, we first see her repairing advanced technology. Without Janeway’s knowledge, she was scanned on entry to the shrine and they instantly found all her hidden tech and knew what it was used for. These people are extremely scientifically advanced, perhaps moreso than Voyager. I also wondered if the woman was chosen to be Janeway’s guide because they were similar in that way.

Janeway is extremely good at leaps of faith. She does that at the end of several episodes when she sets a course for home. It was a new take on her beliefs but not a revelation of new character details. In Resolutions too she was exactly the same: given sufficient time and tools no secrets are out of my reach. That’s her beliefs. These are already established character traits.

I like this episode a lot. I don’t see it as an attempted attack on belief or science, much less a successful one. It’s about dedication more than anything else, to me. Her dedication to science, her dedication to Kes, her dedication to doing the ritual ‘properly’ once she had committed to it.
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Ruth
Wed, Dec 6, 2017, 8:52pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Remember

Skoochy, accusations of starting plagues are common with this kind of prejudice. It doesn’t need to be true and we can see it’s probably not true. The enarans were unnecessarily clean and Kirina would have probably caught something off her boyfriend if it was really like that. I think you also didn’t understand the scene where she gives him up. Her father was saying he had multiple girlfriends and he’d told her he loved her only to get in her knickers. She’s having conflicted feelings and she ends up siding with the familiar, with her father and the status quo.

I thought all of this was pretty clear. The whole episode rings true to me. It’s nice to see a less black and white take on things but still with clear morals and though the atrocities are in the past at least the episode has a fairly hopeful future. I have no idea why the producers didn’t like this episode but quite a few of their decisions baffle me.
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Ruth
Sun, Nov 26, 2017, 1:46pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

But aside from that, the actor playing Tuvix is amazing. Two very hard characters to blend in speech and mannerisms, but he managed. Really well done.
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Ruth
Sun, Nov 26, 2017, 1:45pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

I realised upon watching for the third time what they were trying to do with Tuvix's refusal to go through with the procedure. He was a better security officer than Tuvok and a better chef than Neelix. He was easier for people to get along with than either, appearing neither cold nor overbearingly warm. But he was a worse PERSON. Janeway said Tuvok and Neelix would have gone through with it in his position, and Tuvix, who'd know, doesn't argue. I think actually Neelix would die to save just one other let alone two and let alone them being family or otherwise the same as him. Tuvok might not die for one person in cold blood (the situation where he's putting the Maquis through training is different) but certainly as a vulcan you imagine he'd put the needs of the many before the needs of himself.

But Tuvix wouldn't. He knew how much each man valued his own life and how selfless they would both be but he wouldn't do it. I think this is also what's supposed to justify the ending. Neelix might be a coward generally, but he has a lot of feeling and can find the courage to do what he believes is right. Tuvok is less likely to show he cares about others, but he would do what is logically best and wouldn't be afraid to sacrifice himself. But Tuvix is both cold and cowardly, won't see that it's right to let them both live or that it's logical that two should live over one. A keen mind and following hunches made him better at solving problems, Talaxian spicy cooking and Vulcan bland cooking made him a better cook, but Neelix's feelings-based ethics and Tuvok's logic-based ethics left him without ethics. He's a worse man. Not by any means bad enough to deserve to die, but so bad in comparison to Neelix and Tuvok that he can't be allowed to live at their expense. After all, no-one minded having him around, until the moment it became clear they could have the other pair back.

Tuvok and Neelix seemed to carry his hurt that everyone bar the Doctor and particularly that Janeway had killed him, but they clearly didn't hold it against her or anyone later on. I can only imagine that as Tuvix had their memories, they had Tuvix's, but they still seemed to think what Janeway did was right in the end, because they are better than Tuvix.
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Ruth
Thu, Nov 23, 2017, 8:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Innocence

I love this episode. Tuvok is one of my favourite characters and I like the child actors in this ep, especially Tressa.

I just watched it again and I’ve seen it before. WIth twist endings like this, sometimes it’s fake and they spring it on you out of nowhere. But not in this. Right from the beginning, the “children” are clearly describing what the woman at the end describes, and it’s only because we (reasonably) assume they are children from their appearance that we don’t realise they’re old. The first things they say is that their parents are all dead - but they don’t seem particularly upset about that as they would have hoped to outlive them - and that the attendants are dead, but that the attendants are not their parents. There’s more but that stood out to me as it’s the first things they tell Tuvok about their situation.

I agree with everyone who thinks it’s ridiculous that the woman didn’t tell Voyager about their aging, particularly when she was talking to Tuvok and he asserted that he was protecting Tressa. If she could say at the end that we age the other way around, she had to have known it when she was speaking with Tuvok. It’s silly. And she apparently takes a long time to realise Tuvok was trying to help the “children” and doing very good job of it. They had failed! The shuttle crashed and two “children” died alone, presumably terrified. The two who die when Tuvok is working presumably went to their deaths happy and content, and we know Tressa did. But why did it take so long to send more attendants? Janeway wasn’t checking in on Tuvok’s shuttle that often but she had no reason to, they weren’t on an important mission with vulnerable people.

I really like seeing Tuvok as a father here. He obviously deeply misses his children though of course he denies it. His lullaby was nice too
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Ruth
Thu, Nov 23, 2017, 1:55pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Investigations

William B, you really misunderstood that scene where Janeway said Neelix took the bait. He took Jonas' bait. Tuvok and Janeway knew all about the dodgy log entries. However they'd hit a dead end because they were too well covered up. When Paris left, Jonas used that as an opportunity to frame Paris and take the heat off him (bear in mind he already had his final instructions from Seska, so he's expecting either to be serving under her and Culluh soon or for Voyager to defeat them and to be not found out as a wannabe traitor).

When Jonas knew Neelix was investigating - and remember he does know because he literally was there - he had to act. It was the kind of pressure Tuvok and Janeway were trying but failing to apply to the traitor. It caused him to make a move, which is something they wanted because it's more evidence, more chance to slip up. So, he goes and adds the fake signature to the doctored entries, because he doesn't know Tuvok and Janeway have already seen them, because they've been keeping very quiet until now (that's why Tuvok tries so hard to dissuade Neelix from doing any of this, because he thought it might scare the traitor back into hiding instead of scaring them into making a move). When Neelix announces Paris' guilt on his show, he's taking the traitor's bait, letting them get cosy again. That's what they were talking about. That's why she asks him to investigate again.

Apparently being fine with sacrificing the Talaxians is another matter, definitely. I can only imagine that it's because they could have held them off for a moment and called for Voyager's help as they weren't too far apart yet. Even so, that's pretty irresponsible of Janeway to endanger them like that when they thought they were doing her a favour! Endangering Paris, who is part of her crew and a volunteer for this mission, is one thing, but that's another entirely.

And I couldn't stand when Tuvok's idea of an open comm link is... not having an open comm link. "Omg are you doing sabotage???" and I don't know, Tuvok's on the bog? Even if he was, should he not have mobilised a team at that point and not later? It's annoying when they make characters less intelligent/powerful to serve the plot. Even if he sent the team but they didn't get to the doors before Jonas sealed them, it's the same outcome but less aggravatingly done! I can handle Jonas having weird powers over the ship (as he hasn't been previously shown not to, and he's not really important) but I can't handle Tuvok not keeping his eye on the situation when he literally promised he would. Tuvok isn't supposed to be an idiot or a liar. Anything! Like a scene on the bridge, Tuvok's lost his comm link to Neelix - which would suggest the traitor in action but still not precisely who it is. Whatever! I would still have thought it was stupid even if they hadn't written him to say he was listening, but as they did, it's unforgivable.
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Ruth
Wed, Nov 22, 2017, 6:45am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Dreadnought

Skackle, you're being too harsh. It's clear that Torres was careful to program it to be respectful of anyone who isn't Cardassian and particularly of the Federation. It vaporises the little ships from the planet because it thinks they're Cardassian ships (because it's damaged), but it never fully goes for Voyager because it's not supposed to. And it only takes away life support for B'Elanna, and tells her it's doing so, when it thinks she has fully switched sides, not when it thinks she's merely being coerced. I also assume that it could easily have vented the atmosphere or otherwise outright killed her - it seems it was still expecting to force her off the missile and not kill her.

And the only person it would ever argue with is B'Elanna because these arguments were clearly stated in the episode to be part of how she programmed it, and though it's damaged it still recognises her as its programmer.

Anyway, I like this episode. Obviously the interior is one of their generic ship interiors but who cares? It's just television and they have a limited budget. I can't imagine being taken out of the story by things like reused sets. How can anyone watch Star Trek like that? All the reused caves and town squares and especially the 'wilderness'.

This is an interesting story for what it says about weapons and probably soldiers too. B'Elanna was so careful to make sure Dreadnought would only kill the 'right' people but it wasn't in her hands. She would have been responsible for even more killing (and something that I CAN'T overlook in Star Trek is the stupid village planets - 2 million people on their homeworld?? Yeah right! 2 billion would be low!). B'Elanna is a 'good' person and wouldn't kill innocents, expect she just did. Which is probably what Chakotay's problem was, so I wish they'd gone into that a little more. He's older and wiser than her and maybe he's already learnt this from experience.

I also like the aspect of the fact that Dreadnought was partially right, she had been compromised by the federation. It's an interesting episode for B'Elanna. I also like the parts of the ongoing stories of Wildman's pregnancy, the traitor, and Paris' behaviour. I don't know why people pretend Voyager doesn't have ongoing stories, that's three in one ep for heaven's sake (four if you count "the Maquis" - something else people pretend Voyager doesn't touch on).
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Ruth
Mon, Nov 20, 2017, 7:18am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Threshold

I've just watched this episode for the third time. I have to say I like it. It's camp and ridiculous, but please keep in mind that some people think that describes all of Star Trek!

I think it makes most sense as a dream of Paris. I know that's normally a cheap and stupid explanation/ending, but here it does make sense. The entire thing is so totally focused on him. Even the subtle parts, like B'Elanna, the best engineer, not being the one to help with the final idea - just Tom and his best friend Harry, with the help of Neelix, who only a few episodes ago he came to a better understanding with.

You could also say it moves from father issues, which are a long term thing with him, to issues with his (and almost everyone on Voyager's) mother figure, Janeway. She wants to protect him. Does she believe in him? She does! But, is Harry her favourite son? And then he has teenage tantrums at her when his body is going through scary changes. And after, when his scary transformation is complete, he has sex with her and they have children, but the children don't matter because they aren't real... it really seems like a bad dream. But like a dream, you can see the themes and the ideas. (And I have had recurring bad dreams about spitting out my teeth - maybe his version is spitting out his tongue!)

I think the real idea is what he briefly discusses at the end, what's the worth and cost of proving himself. Janeway says people respect him and that's the end, because that was the answer to the real beginning question, not the matter of crossing the threshold. It was always about his self worth.

Also, I will always love the doctor waking him in sickbay. That's a classic.
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Ruth
Sun, Nov 19, 2017, 4:51pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Prototype

William B, I loved that moment on the viewscreen too. I could just imagine that with all that drama going on he's suddenly like "I am sorry, Lieutenant B'Ellana Torres. I did not realise you were still talking to Captain Kathryn Janeway." If it was supposed to be menacing, it was even more hilarious!

Unlike most of the comments, I don't think it's weird that B'Ellana wanted to fix it. It's a cool robot in space just ripe for fixing. And that it was "dying" gave it more urgency. If it were already "dead" and it was a question of bringing it back, she could have put it in storage for something to do on a rainy afternoon. Isn't it normal to want to fix broken things? In any case, I would have been driven to have done the same as her, if I had her skills
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Ruth
Fri, Nov 10, 2017, 6:06am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Projections

This episode is deeply fascinating BECAUSE it all happens in someone’s head - someone who’s not meant to have a head that things happen inside like this! Seeing Janeway’s weird dream for an hour would be boring and pointless. Of course she has weird dreams, we all do. But the doctor doesn’t.

All of the supposed plot holes too, it’s dream logic. Each new revelation or event only follows from the one directly preceding. It feels just like a dream. But the doctor isn’t supposed to be someone who dreams, or someone who madly tries to force logic in a place it doesn’t belong, only noticing after strange things happen that they were strange - he’s meant to be a program that follows strict logical steps. But he’s clearly not, and if you didn’t get it more subtlely from previous episodes, this one spells it out.

The feedback loop is that the doctor doesn’t know if he’s real or not. Wanting to be real indicates that you’re real. A holographic doctor doesn’t, shouldn’t want to be real. Yet if you’re real, you don’t want to be real, you just ARE. You can see this episode as the one where he truly came to life in a way. So he’s thinking - can I be real if I’m not flesh and blood? If I’m stuck in one room? And he feels like the answer is no, but that still doesn’t stop him believing he is real. So he is confused.

This is part of one of the long stories on voyager, the doctor’s existence as a person. This is what people who dislike Voyager claim to want out of Voyager so I don’t understand the complaints. I’m glad Jammer likes this one as much as I do anyway.
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Ruth
Tue, Nov 7, 2017, 7:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

Evan, that’s interesting. Though it’s true, I was thinking the opposite when I was watching. I liked that the other ship was called the Gagarin. But you’re right, they need to show the international spirit in the crew as well. The first captain had an accent but of course they got rid of her which was a shame.
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Ruth
Tue, Nov 7, 2017, 7:51pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

If the admiral is dead the actress needs to sue the editors. Such short scenes of her on the floor and she moved in one and was breathing in the other if not both. That’s not her fault, someone chose to use the footage of her taking a big breath, you can see her holding all her stomach muscles to hold her breath, it was ridiculous. All these fancy effects and they can’t use the right portion of the clip or the right take or whatever

I like how L’rell is trying to live, what, 4 lives now? I like her a lot (as a character! Wouldn’t want to be her neighbour or especially a competitor!) - I hope she’s going to get away in next week’s confusion and not be killed. I feel like her complaints about the pretty painted petaq were true (and that was before she saw members of her house apparently slaughtered by him), and maybe even getting the admiral out - but I doubt she truly wanted to defect. It just would have been another thing for her to juggle to her and Voq’s advantage

I’m buying the Burnham-Tyler romance. Seems realistic to me. But with this scene too where Saru felt his deception, they’re deliberately making us suspect Tyler of being a spy even if he actually isn’t.
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Ruth
Mon, Nov 6, 2017, 4:21am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: Learning Curve

What these lot do isn’t the maquis way at all. I thought that was clear. Chakotay sacrificed his ship, but only because he knew a bigger friendly ship was right there. He was on a dangerous and impressive retreat into the badlands at the start of the episode. He was a starfleet instructor. He knows how to command a starship. The man here didn’t. He was going off what he’d seen and what he felt with little understanding.

It was also a metaphor for how they felt. They’d rather be aggressive to the end with Tuvok. I had missed that this was also reflected in Janeway’s holonovel as someone pointed out here (it’s a shame they gave up on it when it started getting interesting)

Tuvok failed horribly here because he kept missing his chances. When they complained they were shit after the simulation, why not give tips, get them to try again, tell them to pause and ask him for advice. These aren’t nearly captain ready people proving their ability, they are unskilled and needed training not just testing.

I can understand Tuvok sticking to his old ways and being so rigid he literally can’t understand that Neelix is saying he’s too rigid and not the maquis but I can’t understand that he’s an awful instructor. He doesn’t once instruct! And making Chell clean by hand, that’s just mean and a waste of the crew who are a limited resource.

It’s a shame they messed around the schedule. I did like this episode overall but it doesn’t work as the end. And The 37s doesn’t work as a beginning, so it’s pointless.
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Ruth
Sat, Nov 4, 2017, 7:53am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: State of Flux

The danger of incorrectly shielded replicators is horrifying (and everyone’s sleeping next to them!), but they’re only space microwaves in practice and you want those properly shielded too
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Ruth
Fri, Nov 3, 2017, 9:10pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: Ex Post Facto

What I love about this episode is that they considered the poor dog so ugly he could pass for an alien dog. I feel for him! I wonder if they could put me on Star Trek as an alien without prosthetics too.

I’ve watched this a few times now. I hadn’t realised what bugged me about the text in Tom’s memory before I read the comments here. If they could verify that it was secrets they should have seen it in court. I totally understand that Tom would not have realised but the courts should have. Unless only the semi edited version was shown in court, and the doctor edited the secrets in before implanting it.
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Ruth
Wed, Nov 1, 2017, 3:26pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Magic to Make the Sanest Man Go Mad

Peter G, I totally understand your reading of this episode but I don’t think it was necessarily meant to be read like that. What I saw in the scene where we get Mudd’s murder montage is how deranged and evil he is (or perhaps has become due to the torture that Lorca personally condemned him too - it’s not like he doesn’t have a reason to want to hurt Lorca). We saw that Stamets, who can be a prick but is basically a good guy, couldn’t bear this same killing that Mudd was delighting in. People in this thread are even (coldly!!) saying he was TOO affected by it. So I don’t think we saw at all that the SHOW thought it was funny, just that Mudd did.

Likewise with Lorca being rude about the whale. We saw before he’s heartless and doesn’t care about hurting animals at all. And the show has plainly made him wrong for that. I don’t think it’s anti science either. All the good characters are shown to be intellectually curious scientists, apart from Lorca who just nearly lost his ship (and is a horrible person, but an interesting character well played), the soldier woman who literally got ripped to shreds for her anti science anti animal rights beliefs, and Tyler who is actually not yet shown to be anti science in any way, simply not shown to be a scientist.

So I don’t think it’s fair to say the show is promoting these views when only bad characters do them.

I agree that it’s a problem with the show that it’s addicted to torture. But I don’t think the show likes torture or thinks it’s funny (though not taking it seriously enough is another kind of wrong representation, but not as bad) or that the show is anti science.
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Ruth
Mon, Oct 30, 2017, 9:36pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Magic to Make the Sanest Man Go Mad

I didn’t get from it that Burnham remembered anything by the way. I’ve had serious trouble with the editing on this show before (I didn’t know we saw L’rell on the prison ship, or understand how Lorca wasn’t on Discovery still in that episode - huge stuff like that). We’ve seen that Stamets and Burnham get along well, that he was able to use the secret effectively to get her on side, that she’s a quick learner and basically game even when Stamets is saying she’s going to save everyone by kissing Tyler. So of course he could get her on the scheme faster each time.
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Ruth
Mon, Oct 30, 2017, 9:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Magic to Make the Sanest Man Go Mad

I liked this one a lot, more than any other so far.

I don’t get the complaints about the party. That’s how young people party (why do I sound so old saying that, I’m not even 30 yet). The fancy parties for dignitaries are fine but that’s not the kind of party these lot would throw for each other so it seems normal to me. Even the drinking is normal, aren’t they still on real alcohol and not synthohol in these times too? Music choice is weird but what can you do between licensing and having no idea what music will be like in 200-300 years.

My two main problems - Burnham was taking a SERIOUS risk betting that Mudd would go for two birds in the bush over one in the hand like that. I’m fine with it working but it was extremely risky and the scene didn’t seem to reflect it at all. The other is how truly horrible Mudd was but how much they kinda wave it all away. If he was just vapourising people it wouldn’t be that bad. I can forgive him being cruel to Lorca and Tyler because they were cruel to him, but not the rest of the crew. “Now you have to marry the woman who you led on and whose dowry you stole” is one thing for ship stealing but another for torture!

I liked the whale. I liked how it was in a kind of middle space of being a shock and rare but not so rare no one had seen one. They said something like 58 encounters and laws about them. Often on Star Trek it’s that everyone has seen 1000s or no one has ever seen one. It’s nice to see some kind of endangered species that’s more like what we’re used to on earth. I’m also assuming that the whale is fine on the ship because it flies into denser space to feed. Certainly they didn’t mention it, and surely it’s not law to transport them if it’s bad for them. I liked too that we saw different versions of that scene on the bridge - I was expecting Lorca and Saru to not care so I’m glad they did (if only to avoid charges)

I’m laughing if we get Klingon - federation peace on the back of Burnham and Tyler’s relationship if he is Voq. That’s my copyrighted prediction, cbs have to pay me if they use it. Wouldn’t that be hilarious though?
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Ruth
Tue, Oct 24, 2017, 9:33pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Lethe

Maybe I’m imagining it but I could have sworn we already saw Sarek vs the Vulcan extremists in TNG! They had to find a deadly psychic rock or something and Picard’s pure beautiful thoughts protected him but the bad Vulcans got vaporised. They were underground. I’m so sure that was Vulcans but I can’t remember the episode name and everyone is acting like it’s a crazy and new concept. Maybe it was Romulams but you’d not get a plot out of “some romulans really fucking hate humans” like you would with vulcans

Them bombing the school BECAUSE of Burnham is dreadful, and she actually died, no wonder she’s still so haunted by it, poor chicken

I think it makes sense anyway, we know Vulcans aren’t as perfect as they pretend, we know they make bad decisions based on emotions and lie.

I also want to know if Lorca was deliberately sending the admiral to her doom or not. This kind of plot works better when we have a better understanding of the character, we can’t meet him in the midst of it and get the same out of it.

This episode is making me feel more about the Voq Tyler thing. The way he acted when Lorca said something so casual about where exactly in Seattle his dad taught (was that it?) - so unnatural, even if you’re shy around the captain you’d defend calling something in a town if others would call it near the town. And so convenient all your family, who’d know if it’s you or someone acting as you, are all dead. And the way he JUMPED when Lorca said he trusted him. And all his wisdom about failing your adoptive father. And especially the “haha sounds like being human, PS I’m a human too haha” ending.

And when Burnham got her Sarek attack when he touched her, it’s like they were setting that up for it to make him suspicious, even though this was nothing to do with him. And the admiral specifically asking if he’s trustworthy. And him downplaying being physically as strong as a Klingon.

Stamets is addicted to mushrooms, I didn’t see that coming! Perhaps the mushrooms mind expanding effects are all that was behind last ep’s mirror scene, haha!

I also wondered why we never mentioned freeing the tardigrade and only had the briefest mention of what Stamets did to himself. A bit weird. But I’m sure when we get back to it there’ll be someone talking to an actual child to explain it all. Ugh
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Ruth
Fri, Oct 20, 2017, 12:57pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

Peter G - I didn’t necessarily mean mirror universe, I actually don’t know much about it (not watched DS9 or ENT and only watched TOS as a small child) I just meant that more generally it’s the theme of a mirror and also the kind of lag between Burnhams is like how the Stamets in the mirror was still finishing brushing his teeth when the other had already left the bathroom.

Teo - lots of people mentioned it, I know I did! I can’t believe all the confusing scene changes and then these long exposition scenes. How can they not have time to explain what needs explaining but they have time to show what doesn’t? The one where the three of them were talking about the spore drive/the tardigrade was particularly annoying because there wasn’t even a contrived reason for them to do it. They weren’t explaining it to anyone.

gingerbreadmen - I’m willing to accept some differences to the Klingons we knew if this goes into changes within their culture, which I think it already has a little bit. It’s obvious that these events will cause massive changes for the Klingons, I just hope we get to see it in some detail. Or I would agree that it should be something new.

And to be fair we’ve only had one person claim to be a sex slave to Klingons and he’s probably lying about it because she could only have known him for about a month but he claims seven months. Of course, it could be that he lied about the time for unrelated reasons and she actually has been raping him for a month but I hope not.
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Ruth
Wed, Oct 18, 2017, 8:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

Lod - for me that’s part of the problem, Saru wasn’t following the admirals orders at all! They were also concerned about overusing the tardigrade though only for ulilty’s sake and not because it’s obviously wrong.

People saying it’s not clear the tardigrade was suffering by the way, what have you been watching? It screams and thrashes, it sustains brain damage, it becomes weak and sickly. That’s very blatant. There have been some like in Voyager with some holographic life form that wasn’t obviously alive in the first place let alone being injured by voyagers experiments, this wasn’t like that at all. This is an animal shrieking and becoming ill and collapsing. And in that voyager episode, as SOON as they realised they’re hurting it they both stopped and tried to make amends, even after they thought one had killed some of the crew

God I want them to let Janeway loose on these monsters.

I don’t really care about Saru’s sad feelings, he’s a dickhead. I really liked him before. Tell me where they teach them in the academy, or just where anyone’s mother teaches anyone you can do a biiit of torture if you’re having a rough day because you’re feeling jealous of a hated scapegoat you have complete power over. What a knob! The first cool looking alien character and they do this to him. He never admitted fault or apologised to anyone and Burnham acts like it’s okay and their captain would have been alright with it???? What a joke!

No one else has mentioned, I think Burnhams nightmare at the beginning was also about the reflection. At first it seems like just empathy for the being on the other side of the glass - but with Stamets reflection it seems much more literal. I wonder if residual mind meld stuff has given her low grade psychic powers? Of course it could be coincidence inside the story, but I think we were meant to see it.

Lorca didn’t disappoint me by leaving a prisoner behind because I already knew he was evil. And what’s with his little story about the one ship without a self destruct for those circumstances where every other captain self destructs? I hate him

The new guy is plainly a liar. I didn’t get at first that that was L’rell but knowing that he is so clearly hiding something. I don’t know about this theory that he’s Voq. I rewatched those scenes and I can’t see it. He was really going at L’rell as well and I doubt it or her accusation was for acting because Lorca wasn’t there. But then he was there again magically. The editing leaves something to be desired. But we know L’rell hasn’t been raping him for seven months because we know what she’s been doing. I don’t get it at all. Whatever he is, I do think he knew about discovery. I never hope for too much with subtle readings of Star Trek but it seems like his delivery of that line about ‘no starfleet ship could get out here’ was very pointed and intense and not the kind of laughing sarcasm you’d expect from someone actually responding to what Lorca said as if they really thought no ship had those capabilities.

(I thought it was lazy him saying ghost ship and L’rell saying it - I’m glad it was on purpose)

I do also love the ridiculous scene where baby Burnham Tilly and Stamets deliver their little presentation on the spore drive. How can there be time for that nonsense and not time for other scenes - I didn’t get that Lorca wasn’t holding that meeting on the discovery for example! Shocking editing, you never had this problem on old Trek

I’m still going to watch but I’m baffled by what they did with Saru. One measly line about “i know what the admirals said and I think this is the kind of situation where we have to do this” or especially also “if they find out about spore drive they will definitely be cruel to the tardigrades so harming one to stop that is okay” - ANYTHING and not just him going against starfleet to do something cruel when all he ever did before is so what starfleet said to the letter and despise cruelty
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