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PositronicNet
Mon, Dec 1, 2014, 4:38am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: The Passenger

Though I should add that I probably would have given this episode 1/5 due to the nerd rage it induced in me alone.
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PositronicNet
Mon, Dec 1, 2014, 4:34am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: The Passenger

"Very entertaining, but completely lacking any real science. Totally preposterous. Especially, "Humans only use a portion of their brain". A common myth. Nearly the entire brain is used, and it all serves a function, even if we don't yet have a complete picture of it."
Precisely, except the total lack of plausible science really ruined it for me - I could not take it seriously at all. That small portion of the brain myth line was the first sign that this episode was going to be riding on the edge of a neuroscience-plausibility wave - in my opinion it failed to ride it. It crashed into the ocean too early to create a favorable impression and then proceeded to flounder helplessly in the water.

Scientists are struggling to find a neural correlate of consciousness and yet this episode expects us to believe that: 1) Dax finds it in less than 12 hours... under the pretenses of a technological mechanism she only just learned about.
2) Finds a way to disrupt it.
3) Magically transmits it to Dr. Bashir through a tractor beam.

No way. I am not believing any of that for a second.

It was heavily implied in The Measure of the Man in ST:TNG that the mystery of consciousness has not been solved in the 24th century since neither Picard nor Dr Maddox can say how to recognize it in another being, so this episode also fails at adhering to its own canon. If the neural correlate of consciousness is unknown, then what Dax did in this episode is completely implausible.

This episode deserves a 2/5 at most, IMO.
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