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Peremensoe
Sun, Sep 29, 2019, 11:41am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: A Simple Investigation

I find that a bit of theorizing -- perhaps not directly supported by the explicit facts of this or that episode, but making a kind of sense of them -- is pretty much essential to supporting the "the reality of the Star Trek universe."
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Peremensoe
Sat, Apr 20, 2019, 9:17am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Such Sweet Sorrow, Part 2

@Booming
@Dom

Through the first two seasons of the Expanse, I didn't see Holden as "the" lead -- Miller and Avasarala were also focal points, the Roci worked as an ensemble, and there were key scenes apart from all of the above.

The show's "world" is at least half of what makes me care about the plot to begin with, so sacrificing the former for the latter is a very bad trade for me.
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Peremensoe
Wed, Apr 17, 2019, 3:25pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

Tuvix *is* a fully-realized (not even embryonic) living being, standing before us -- sentient and conscious and with an interest in self-preservation. That the circumstances of his birth into the world were unusual, even unfortunate, cannot be a reason to kill him. Not holding to this most-fundamental precept opens the door for all kinds of abuses.
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Peremensoe
Mon, Apr 8, 2019, 3:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Through the Valley of Shadows

If it's the one I'm thinking of, it's a digital composite, not a real photo from production.
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Peremensoe
Sat, Apr 6, 2019, 6:55am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Through the Valley of Shadows

L'Rell looked weird -- not just her puffy face, but the hair and the outfit.

I also rather liked Tenavik. I took it that his age was not only physical appearance, but a product of living through or looking into many windows of time, perhaps sometimes in loops.

I hate the pressing to get Culber and Stamets back together. Culber's sense of disconnection from the life previously lived by his original model made perfect sense.
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Peremensoe
Tue, Apr 2, 2019, 10:06am (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S2: Cogenitor

I'm old enough to remember when prioritizing everybody-getting-along and relative cultural values over individual freedom was derided as squishy-left.
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Peremensoe
Tue, Apr 2, 2019, 9:57am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Perpetual Infinity

"Please stop it with the 'alternate timeline' thing.... if there were such a thing, then losing all sentient life in the galaxy wouldn't matter because one could just jump back and splinter off another damn timeline..."

It matters to everybody living in the timelines that get wiped out!

Suppose that, in real life, the Many Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics was somehow mathematically confirmed. Would you stop caring about your own life, about the particular world you live in? I imagine philosophy would see an upheaval, but the direct facts of our own existence would be pretty much the same.
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Peremensoe
Mon, Mar 25, 2019, 8:56pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: The Red Angel

Thanks, Yanks. Seems weak.

I'm not sure Mama Burnham *is* coming from the Control future. She's apparently been back and forth across centuries -- or someone in the suit has, or will have -- but did Mom come forward from Michael's past?
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Peremensoe
Sun, Mar 24, 2019, 7:51pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: The Red Angel

OK, here's a serious question about the episode at hand. I see people arguing about the logistics of the Angel-capture, but nothing on the reasoning of it.

If they believe the Angel is a future-Burnham... and she's "one of us," presumed to be on the right side... and she does in fact appear to be saving people with each appearance, and working against the evil future-Control... why do they want to *capture* her? Why not try to talk to her? Work with her? Nobody even questions this?
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Peremensoe
Sat, Mar 23, 2019, 11:53pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S2: Cogenitor

You know, Trish, you don't have to agree with the "billboarded" interpretation. As I said in 2013, I think Archer was wrong. I'm with Trip and Picard -- instinctively rejecting the chaining of minds.
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Peremensoe
Sat, Mar 23, 2019, 9:55pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: The Red Angel

The multiplicity of timelines/universes/realities is so established in Trek -- well before the 2009 movie was made. From "Mirror, Mirror" to "Parallels" and beyond, it's as much a Trek trope as time travel/weirdness.

The odd thing to me is that we fans mostly do accept the concept, but then don't apply it when it so easily solves the cross-series canon and continuity questions. You don't buy Peck-Spock as the same character as the primary Nimoy-Spock? Fine, they're not. Have as many timelines as you need, to accommodate the Trek shows you like to watch. Or call them the same character, if that works for you and increases your enjoyment.

Personally, I think of the main line of TNG and DS9 as one reality -- apart from those episodes that explicitly depart it -- but otherwise I don't much care. It doesn't really matter whether Discovery is the past to *the* OS and subsequent events that I watched, or another version of them.
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Peremensoe
Sat, Mar 16, 2019, 6:11am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Project Daedalus

"Commander Nham was the weakest point. Not because of her acting but because she for the most part felt shoehorned in. There was a moment were she looked at Ariam and I thought 'What is she doing on the bridge? Is she just standing around?'"

She was *watching* Airiam, in suspicion. After the previous scene where she questioned her, I thought Nhan might actually figure out Airiam's duplicity right there. As it was, she was just primed to push the button on her later.

Notice also how real-Airiam's struggle to expose/sabotage hacked-Airiam was shown in the exchanges with Tilly.
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Peremensoe
Fri, Feb 15, 2019, 4:49pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Saints of Imperfection

@Loud Morn

Not sure I agree with everything there about Voyager, but that’s a fun read. Thanks :-)
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Peremensoe
Thu, Jun 21, 2018, 9:53am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Sword of Kahless

I assume "sword" is just the English approximate translation.
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Peremensoe
Fri, Oct 27, 2017, 2:03am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: Behind the Lines

DLPB: "A massive conquering and brutal attack force does not care about good press. Do you honestly think Hitler was doing PR during his campaigns across Europe in WWII?"

He certainly was. With Goebbels and Riefenstahl and many others assisting. It was a principal ministry of the Nazi government. Hitler cared a lot about what people thought. Germans, annexed and occupied countries, neutral countries, and enemies--all had propaganda carefully composed for them. It was both cynical and audacious; in 1944 the Nazis invited the Red Cross to visit Theresienstadt concentration camp--elaborately prepared for the occasion--to see how well the inmates were being treated!
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Peremensoe
Tue, Oct 17, 2017, 9:50pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

"@Peremensoe -- stating that escapism is the opposite of moral courage may be true, but how is that relevant in the least to Discovery? These cats are some of the most morally bankrupt, amoral people we've seen in positions of authority in Starfleet. Again, these folks behave like the jerks that are messing up the 21st century. Who wants that? "

Look. The themes of a narrative work, including a film or show, are not just in the explicit words and deeds of the central characters. Stories can have flawed, even reprehensible protagonists, and still carry righteous messages. Despite what you may have heard about "Roddenberry rules," Star Trek has always depicted some members of Starfleet and the Federation as being morally problematic people, to say the least. The "insane" (or evil) admiral is a Trek trope, for godsake. We've literally seen traitors and murderers in positions of authority in Starfleet, not to mention all manner of prejudice, vanity, and pettiness. It's not just a matter of individual miscreants, either; Discovery's Mudd isn't the first the see the "arrogance" of Starfleet and the Federation as institutions.

None of this detracted from the moral themes; often these aspects were the fulcrums of the narrative. Stories about people struggling to discover and uphold principles in difficult circumstances, to become better, are generally a lot more compelling than people just *being* perfect, in perfect organizations.

Besides all that, I think you're just wrong about the Discovery characters. Lorca may be an impenetrable thicket as yet, and Burnham is a troubled soul, but even so I think most of the named crew we've seen are people who want to do the right thing, as best they can discern it and are able.
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Peremensoe
Tue, Oct 17, 2017, 1:07pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

Yanks: "I don't know that I subscribe to the Multi-Verse thing in trek. We only got that in one episode (TNG: Parallels) right?"

"Parallels" is the most explicit presentation of the larger (beyond the MU) Trek multiverse. But it's *so* explicit, it seems to me you really can't have any other interpretation without throwing away that ep. And it's a great one (IMO) so why would you do that?

Accepting the Trek multiverse has a lot of advantages in interpretations of other episodes. It gives a logic and a 'place' for the MU (or the complex of related MUs), the reverse/antimatter universes, all manner of "fluidic" and "trans-dimensional" and "non-corporeal" spaces, the Nexus, the Continuum, and wherever the Traveler comes from. It gets you out of just about any time-travel 'paradox,' if you need it, as well as any continuity 'problem' between series.
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Peremensoe
Tue, Oct 17, 2017, 12:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

William... what *did* Discovery do? The tardigrade was freed, and a crewman took its place in the drive system (at the possible cost of himself, maybe the whole ship, perhaps the war effort). It's not "devolved" to acknowledge that moral challenges can be complicated, that principles can conflict, that things are not always what they first seem, that people do not always know the right thing at once.

HawgWyld: "The Federation was presented as an ideal which appealed mightily to the escapist in all of us."

Escapism is the opposite of moral courage. Star Trek was at its least important when the Federation, and the audience, were most comfortably assured.
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Peremensoe
Tue, Oct 17, 2017, 12:05am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

"But somehow if it's a gay scene I don't want in Star Trek it automatically means I'm a homophobe."

What else could it mean? Could an objection to characters of various skin tones be anything but racism?

Same-sex couples are a normal part of civilized society, and it is strange and repressive if they are *not* represented in popular stories. As wolfstar said, "If it's not what you grow up seeing, it's always gonna take you aback a little, especially if you don't know any gay people, don't see gay couples in public where you live, and don't see them on TV." That's why we need to see them on TV.
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Peremensoe
Mon, Oct 16, 2017, 11:42pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

vofeeto: "(btw is the $9.99 worth it for anyone who pays for it? Curious)"

Absolutely. The time not spent watching commercials, and mood-impact not incurred, is easily worth four bucks. (See www.jammersblog.com/2017/09/26/should-you-pay-for-cbs-all-access/ for the discussion of the access model.)
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Peremensoe
Mon, Oct 16, 2017, 11:20pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

Yanks: "Also, the mirror scene at the end... What do you all think the remaining reflection for lack of a better way to put it means? Are we in a mirror universe?"

My guess is that interacting with the mushroom world has caused Stamets to begin 'smearing' into a macroscopic quantum superposition, kind of an incomplete separation of the multiverse timelines that slightly different choices (turn away versus stand longer at the mirror) would normally spawn in Trek cosmology. Because we know that Trek is a multiverse (not just Prime and Mirror 'verses, but countless parallel possibilities), and we've recently been told that the key to understanding the mushroom world is on a "quantum level."

By the way, I really liked how this moment was preceded by a very mundane domestic scene. It kind of lulled us with the idea that this was just a little character moment for Stamets and Culber, before going spooky.
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Peremensoe
Mon, Oct 16, 2017, 10:57pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

Peter G.: "Returning to my concern about the previous episode, we do indeed bear witness in this installment to the fact that the creature howling in agony whenever it's plugged in seems to be unrecognizable to anyone on the ship as torture, or even discomfort or mistreatment. Is the audience being treated to Ripper's inner monologue whenever we watch it scream? If not, what gives? We seem to have it confirmed that this is a ship of Nazis, where even the suggestion that the creature is suffering, no less sentient, is brushed aside with zero crew members raising a fuss about it."

Huh? This issue is literally the primary theme of this couplet of the last two episodes, and the referent of both titles. "Choose your pain" was a phrase used by the Klingon thugs, but the thematically-relevant painful choices are those of Discovery crew, namely Burnham, Saru, and Stamets, each of whom has a struggle along character and story rails established in previous episodes. The crew initially has no reason to think of the tardigrade as more than an animal (and this is an era when some humans are still eating animals), and most of them don't see its experience in the chamber. But the abuse is explicitly recognized, and rejected in the end.
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Peremensoe
Mon, Oct 16, 2017, 12:26am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

I suppose another advantage would be that you could rotate the image, or walk around it, to see the other side.
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Peremensoe
Mon, Oct 16, 2017, 12:23am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

You think holographic tech "of this quality" is harder than molecularly-accurate matter-energy transport?

The existence of conventional mirrors (if that's what they are) is irrelevant; the advantage of the holo app, like the phone light, is that you can call it up from a general-purpose system when you don't have the standard, dedicated tech available.
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Peremensoe
Sun, Oct 15, 2017, 11:48pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Choose Your Pain

There's nothing absurd about the holomirror app. It's a simple, obvious, and practical application of holo tech--the equivalent of using the camera-flash LED on your phone as a flashlight.
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