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Nolan
Fri, Jun 25, 2021, 7:18pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: The Mark of Gideon

"A new life awaits you in the Off-world colonies. The chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure."

I mean, this planet somehow built an exact replica of a starship. Unless they're the Pakleds, making it go shouldn't be too tough for them. As for Earth, it's about time we spread out. If for nothing else than to put considerably more distance between disagreeing societies.
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Nolan
Fri, Jun 11, 2021, 7:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Time Squared

Gor me, as I was going through and curating a watchlist for my friend, TNG S2 was the easiest for me to nail episodes down, even though it has far fewer episodes than other seasons. I didn't have to reckon with poor to middling episodes that are pseudo- relevant to later developments, or bad episodes with iconic moments. The only one I hemmed and hawed on has been "Unnatural Selection" for it's focus on O'Brien. Otherwise, pretty much every episode is either relevant but at least average, or a standout/iconic. Basically, the episodes in S2, for me at least, are extremely easy to define as "worth it" or "skippable" something most seasons of Star Trek don't have, even if my list only ended up with 10 out of 22.
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Nolan
Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 2:15am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Loss

I dunno if I can judge... I mean, a good number of us whinge on every new comment thread about nuTrek... so it's not without SOME precedent. And yet, there IS something slightly different about older, and even newer fans complaining about the failings of a NEW entry, versus an potentual new "fan" going to an older entry and bemoaning it. I mean, what, did they watch Disco or Picard, somehow liked that problem laced, fast-pased thrown-together narrative (which Chabon has admitted to, btw) and decided to go back and found (and rightly so) that the shows they watched are not at all like the ones that came before?

Or mayhaps it's a disgruntled nuTrekkie try to prove a point and critisizing a show we like in order to get "the haters" to reply in ways the nuTrekkies do about their showswhen faced with criticism which the "haters" bristle at and argue against, thus proving haters are hypocrits. Though again, the new product vs old one does shift that narrative.

Or it's a smartass trying to get a rise. Or a regular ol' hatewatcher. I have noticed this one here tends to rag on the women characters/actors more too, intetestingly.

So many possibilities for why they're here though. In the words of Spock, "fascinating."
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Nolan
Fri, May 21, 2021, 4:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Duet

In TNG S4, we learned that the Federation was at war with Cardassia, but which was now ended. Likely the Federation wished to end the war relatively quickly after the Borg decimation of the fleet at Wolf 359. Due to this weakened military power, the Federation probably started making more diplomatic and peaceful solutions than they had been. They likely also propoosed major consessions they otherwise wouldn't have in order to gain that peace. And indeed, the next 2 years saw a rather tense negotiation period as weapons shipments and DMZ protocol breaches were frequent and distrust reigned. Even during the final negotiations the Cardassians were highly suspicious of the Federation's plans, kidnapping and tourturing Captain Picard for information before Captain Jellico called their bluff and got them to back down from reinitializing hostilities.

We can assume Bajor was far enough out from the proposed border changes that if would always fall in Federation space, and the planets they gave up in the DMZ also likely made Cardassia more willing to give up it's claim on Bajor in exchange for whatever resources and military advantages were to be found on those former Federation Colonies. And, having been weakened by the Borg, the Federation were willing to trade them all for a relative backwater and potential new ally and post with which to monitor Cardassian movements, while Cardassia, equally knowing the Federations weakened bargaining position and strength, clearly planned to put pressure on the Bajoran outpost and slowly build up to a take-over attempt, as seen in how they made their presence known in "Emissary" and throughout S1 and the big push in the opening arc of S2.
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Nolan
Tue, May 11, 2021, 7:37pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: The Chase

RIP to Norman Lloyd, the actor for Picard's Archaeology professor Richard Galen. He lived a good long life of 106 years, and shocked me when I watched the Hitchcock film 'Sabateur' two years ago for looking oddly familiar in a 1942 film when I'd not seen a ton of films of the era. Not only was he in Star Trek at the age of 79, he was still alive and kicking.
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Nolan
Tue, May 11, 2021, 7:19pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

I always used to think that having a platform meant there was an obligation to use it, to try and reach out and make a difference in the world, rather than just taking whatever riches and influence that platform would give and hoarding it.

I'm kinda changing my mind on that. I still don't think the affordances of having a platform to use should be ignored, but there is a rather large responsibility to that. It's not just about spouting out a message, you gotta reach out. Having a platform means having a stage to examine a debate, to present both sides and look at an issue and the pros and cons of each side, and sure, while the person who has that platform, be it a writer, actor, politician or influencer likely falls on one side over the other, by doing the full examination they at least get to justify WHY they choose the side they do, with oppertunity to fall on the opposing side depending on shifting variables perhaps. Instead most people nowadays feel having a platform is not for an examination and debate of an issue, but a chance to deliver a sermon from the mount. I am a somewhat religious fellow, but I know the kind of blind faith the latter gets couched in and encourages when looking at an issue is far more detrimental than an actual angry discourse could be.

People don't want to be told what to believe and think, they want tto be told WHY they might want to think that and given the choice to either decide to agree, or disagree and present their case without the opposing side having been emotionally incited against them for not "following the way."
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Nolan
Sat, May 8, 2021, 9:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

@Trent, Rahul,

Why do you think so many are simply saying "This isn't Star Trek!"? It's to save ourselves from this slushpile of misery.

I quit after Picard. I couldn't take watching the broad ideals I value in Trek being nose-dived by these clueless writers.

I still have to deal with people talking about the new shows favorably on social media, and keep an eye on the news and review sites to see what aspect of the franchise they aim to butcher, ruin and rot next, (it's Q, btw) and get frusterated by that, but as far as the shows themselves, I'm out. The Canadian broadcast won't benefit from my views now.
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Nolan
Sat, May 1, 2021, 11:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S3: Twilight

@nil

All I can say is, stick it out. It wasn't planned from the outset, but the Vulcans ARE eventually addressed. Whether it'll work for you I cannot say, but at least it doesn't exist in a void and is given *A* reason.
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Nolan
Sun, Apr 18, 2021, 12:20am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Children of Time

@Sigh2000

Its called a causal loop or a bootstrap paradox.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causal_loop
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Nolan
Thu, Apr 15, 2021, 5:09pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: For the Uniform

@Booming et all:

Why when talking about the end of this episode do so many forget it takes place in 24th Century Star Trek? I'm not saying gassing this planet wasn't extreme, it was. But let's not forget a couple of factors:

A) This is a FRONTIER Colony. That means we can make a few assumptions; i) the population is likely highly localized, all within reasonable distance to transport, and not spread out over both hemispheres. ii) The populations of these planets are likely hardy people who volunteered to live far away from Earth and all it's creature comforts, who expected a life of somewhat hard labour and work. The population of this planet very likely has few to none infirm desk jockeys or people with serious enough medical issues to need special care. If they did, they likely would've been sent off-world to a place that could better care for them than the town doctor.

B) This IS the 24th Century. We have TRANSPORTERS. Even if there are farmers at the outskirts of the colony borders, it's a matter of ease to either get beamed into town or, up to ships already launched who have bio-scanners that can isolate life-forms and beam them up. They likely also have large cargo ships for transporting livestock and possessions from when they arrived that can also be used to beam all that stuff back.

I'm not saying that there SHOULDN'T be some follow up to this and I do think the fpisode erred in it's jokey send off rather than imply that Sisko's going to have to at LEAST face a rightfully annoyed Admiral. But given the setting and circumstances, I also don't think his gassing of the planet, in THIS CASE is as huge and as extreme and evil as some are making it out to be. It was extreme, but it was also not genocide. That's just blowing it way out of proportion.
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Nolan
Sun, Apr 11, 2021, 11:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: 11001001

@Silly

Can't remember off-hand but was this Earth they were at? Regardless, who's to say it's the same spacedock? 70 some years have passed, so, they probably just built a bigger Spacedock in that time.
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Nolan
Wed, Mar 24, 2021, 7:55pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Horizon

@Franke's Nughtmare

My headcanon is that World War 3 and EMP's pretty much wiped all 21st century digital stored and recorded culture.
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Nolan
Fri, Mar 19, 2021, 4:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: A Matter of Perspective

I think a LOT of people are missing the point of that scene and the episode. It's not an either/or situation. The way those scenes in the bedroom were presented were how the characters REMEMBERED it. Neither one is more true or false than the other. The actual, factual Truth is somewhere in between.

Riker in general is a flirty frakking guy. He's got charm. Manua probably read into that. Riker probably mis-read signals Manua was sending out. Both probably on some level found the other attractive.

It's entirely possible that Riker at one point touched Manua in a way he didn't notice, pay attention or regard of any importance while she saw it as a sexual advance. She probably likewise did some innocous (to her) action he read into as a sexual advance. Both probably said something with one intended meaning, while the other read a different meaning into those words, which through faulty memory, repressed attraction and a bit of shame, the interpreted meaning over-rode the actual words.

It's not just a matter of memory either. Each retelling had differences in detail and focused on different details. What one person might regard as significant, a fabric colour, tone of voice or action, another dould take no notice of, and therefore, not attach any signifucance or meaning to. That's why communication can be so hard. Because you're not just working with your own preconceptions about everything, but the other person's as well. We see this in TV viewers all the time too. One audience member might pick up and focus on a detail that another audience member might've slipped right past.

As much as I don't like the way the phrase is used in today's parlance, Riker is telling his Truth, Manua is telling hers and the actual facts of the events are somewhere in between.

Is the accusation of rape extreme? Very much so. But in the time this was written, it was a dramatic example to get the point of the episode across. Additional perspectives and understandings cultivated in the intervening time since the episode aired likewise have shaped the interpretation of that scene.
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Nolan
Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 6:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S4: In a Mirror, Darkly, Part II

@Tom

A) The uniformn division colors in Enterprise are the same as they were on TOS, just less noticable because they were mere shoulder stripes.

B) The crew that boarded the Defiant did so with EVA suits on and wore the TOS style uniforms as they had to take their outer regular duty jumpsuits off to put on the EVA suits, meaning they didn't have their regular uniforms on hand.
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Nolan
Mon, Mar 8, 2021, 5:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: What You Leave Behind

As always, great, insightful replies from this group. I have to admit, when a couple people hit me with the DS9 is not optimistic and sneered at the idea, I at least needed to take a moment to verify my reading of the series. But I figured I couldn't be THAT wrong. Yeah, it's "the war series" but it's also so much more than that. Indeed, as I mentioned, the thinking behind those sneering opposing views seems to be the trend among the younger viewers. This, plus the entire argument, betrayed a lack of nuance, perspective and comprehension in the thinking I encountered, as well as a sence of entitlement and in-grained unmovable conviction in that thinking. "It can't be wrong because I thought of it." There's also a trend to take insults of an argument as an insult to the arguer.

But yest @the other Bob, I knew going in diving into that topic on Twitter was folly, and yet here I am. This fool trod where angels fear to go.

Not that'll help my case for doing so, but the reason I waded in was because I saw that tired and lazy "It's Star Trek because Star Trek is in the title argument" with the counterpoint that even though the botched restoration of a"The Virgin Mary" painting is still called as such, no one would say it is the same as it was before. It is clearly an inferior product.

The argument to this was that there are many different parts of the Trek franchise rather than a singular work. This is what lead to the Trek's main thrust is optimism perspective.

It was, in all very unproductive in terms of convincing others, as most endeavours to do so on the internet are, but it did allow me a better chance to see and analyze the thinking of those on the opposing side at least.
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Nolan
Mon, Mar 8, 2021, 2:58am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: What You Leave Behind

So, last week, like a doofus, I decided to disagree with someone on Twitter about nuTrek. Yeah, big mistake. But the way that arguement went has kinda sat with me all this time. Essentially the defendents view was that Star Trek's core tenent is exploration, and thus it should be able to explore different tones. My counterpoint that Trek's core tenent is optimism, and the tone of the franchise should be one that is optimistic.

Their counter the THAT was... Deep Space Nine. Because DS9 to them is not an optimistic show. And all I could think was how surface level are people viewing these shows to see a series that yes, does revolve around a costly and deadly war, but is also still optimistic? I listed out a number of optimistic aspects of the show, Nog's easy physical recovery from a grave injury, the ease of availability for psychological help with that, the Bajoran's recovery efforts and the major strides in that, stuff like that.

The person screenshotted it and then posted a smug tweet of it to their followers. No doubt hoping to dogpile as well as provoke me into saying something they could victimize themselves with. That bait I did not take and did my best to extricate myself from what I sensed could turn into a nasty twitter dogpile, cause boy do some people know how to game that system to work for them and point their "legions" in a direction, as they paint themselves in a certain way, regardless of other perspectives.

But I realized that a) if the reading comprehension of modern (entitled) viewers is so shallow so as to only see surface level of the media they partake in, then OF COURSE nuTrek is to their liking and those damn shows found and are writing for their audience. And b) if that is NOT the case, then perhaps *I* mis-read this show...

So, is Star Trek: Deep Space Nine an optimistic show? And does it provide reasonable justification for the existence of the darker toned, harsher nuTrek shows?
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Nolan
Sat, Feb 13, 2021, 2:11pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

Yep Sven, there's just not much there. What makes this whole nuTrek v. Classic Trek thing more frusterating isn't JUST the departures from the old shows, but that the shows themselves aren't actually that good on their own. It's not like the people who don't like them are saying they'd be good if they weren't identified under the "Star Trek" label (although I think they'd be viewed BETTER) but that they're just not overly well thought out or constructed either way. And yet, people are gobbling them up. I have to wonder if the Star Trek brand and the identity politics of representation are blinding people from critical analysis and giving them bias. On the other hand, as you said, your wife likes it.

I think perhaps what really frusterates me is that usually with most things, I can see the otherside, see where people are coming from. Trek TAUGHT me that. But with this, I have no idea how people how people can't see the flaws that are glaringly obvious to me. I can't understand it, or see what they see that elevates this spate of new Trek.

You've given it 4 seasons so far, S1 of Picard was my Strike three. I only come back here to keep abreast of the decisions the writers have made so I can figure out ways to write them away. Otherwise I'm done watching Star Trek: Dilution, Star Trek: Picked Apart and Star Trek: Lower Brow.
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Nolan
Wed, Feb 10, 2021, 8:08pm (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S3: Unfinished Business

@ Kirk Walker,

Based on context, I believe it's supposed to mean "will they, won't they" Mostlikely a typo of the initialism.
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Nolan
Tue, Feb 9, 2021, 6:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Nemesis

I've always got a chuckle out of the idea that Starfleet kicked her upstairs after either her sketchy decisions in the DQ, or the trauma from it.
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Nolan
Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 12:50pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

Rest in Peace, Christopher Plummer.
"Cry havok, and let slip the dogs of war!"
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Mark Nolan
Fri, Jan 22, 2021, 5:23am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Life Support

... also Bareil 2.0 would have been unique*. Is he human? What makes someone human? He was born a human, he has a human body, he has his memories and personality, he can even father human children (with his human body).

* In the ST universe, and possibly in science fiction (certainly the popular franchises).
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Mark Nolan
Fri, Jan 22, 2021, 4:59am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Life Support

"An alive (but robotic) Bareil would have been a decent way of handling his character going forward"

I agree. This would have been fascinating, and different from Data's journey (an android wanting to become more human).

Bareil 2.0 would be a human with his brain replaced with a positronic matrix (is he still human?) . Effectively a robot brain with a human body - as opposed to a human brain with a robot body (e.g. RoboCop). SciFi doesn't have many characters like this - I can't think of any.

Bareil 2.0 would have somehow had Bareil's memories and personality transferred, since that's what Bareil wanted in order to do whatever it takes to continue the peace treaty negotiations. It raises many questions, and it would be interesting to see how Bareil 2.0 navigates being thrown into Bareil 1.0s life. Bareil 2.0 could discover new things about himself, for example if his "software" (memories and personality) is now being run on superior hardware, what would that mean? Let's say he can think quicker, how will that affect the development of his personality, or his interactions with others. I think Bareil 2.0 could have been one of the most interesting characters in all of SciFi.
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Nolan
Sun, Jan 17, 2021, 4:11pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Generations

All that said, I just watched the originally shot "Christmas" sequence on the DVD and it was clunky as all heck. Picard's blindfold comes off and all his kids (including two that got cut) are standing there in front of him, oldest to youngest, arrayed like their taking a darned photograph and "Acting." Rene wasn't there and it was far more subdued, stiff and formal. If you thought the version in the film was saccharine, then this version was choking to death on it's "sweetness" Picard would not have pulled himself away from that Christmas, he have RUN.

The more chaotic, rambunctious version definitely rang truer and I think played into the mind set of Picard's head space at the time. "What if I had a family? What if I weren't a stick in the mud? What if I enjoyed being around kids? What if I could do everything different? Maybe I would be so grief stricken right now if *I* were different."

And apparently, during this and the reshoot for the final fight, Stewart was on another movie and had grown out his hair. So for portions of Generations he was fake bald... er. You'd think with an actor like Stewart, you wouldn't have to deal with changing hair styles, but not so I guess, haha.

It's no Super-stasche though. Lookin' at you, Justice League.
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Nolan
Sun, Jan 17, 2021, 6:41am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Generations

I myself watched Generations last week. I STILL think All Good Things isthe bigger, more climactic story that ties a bow on TNG better than this movie. But this film is richly themed, exploring the desires of both Catains and tying them together.

I think it's easy to forget WHY Kirk's Nexus fantasy ends up as it does, because there's a whole movie between when he enters the Nexus and Picard meeting him.

He goes from ringing in the Enterprise-B, feeling old and outdated, and yet struggling with the youthful inexperience of the ahem, Next generation of Starfleet officer, (no doubt the performance of the young captain emblematic of how fans fearedaTNG would go; a new younger crew, parroting Treknobabble while trying to emulate the example of the TOS crew) feeling reduced to giving empty soundbites for media outlets in what amounts to a tickertape parade, realizing his focus on his career lead him to this point and, for the moment, finding it empty. Meanwhile he finds out Sulu, a Captain like him, has found time for a family and has a living legacy while his is a young, inexperienced, unprepared captain sitting in the seat he gave up. And off to the Nexus he goes. To when he can take the last chance he had to avoid the life he ended up with and became personally disillusioned with.

Picard goes on a similar journey. His brother hada kid and he saw that as his chance to devote himself to the life of Starfleet. An escape from the pressure and responsability of family life. Besides, he hated kids. But as we know, he actually met his nephew and related to him a bit at a time when his faith in Starfleet life was shaken and he grew to be if not at ease with kids, then at least able to tolerate them. And then his nephew dies and he's hit by the loss of that potential and connection to his own youth and feels like maybe he cheated choosing Stargleet over family and feeling perhaps empty in the moment about the course of his life. And of course,I've been watching some first time reactions to early TNG where the viewers find Picard's surliness towards kids amusing so his hatred of kids at that point was fresh in my mind when I watched this again and so help me I cried. I was just hit by that man's journey from not wanting to deal with children to recognizing the joy and pride kids can bring and wanting to be swarmed by their hugs and appreciation. And happy to have it.

Both Captains find the thing that'll bring them joy from the despair of moment the Nexus took them. And were sorely tempted by that promise of family and happiness and in a way by the choice to be selfish. But both come to realize that's not who either of them are. They both chose the life of Stardleet, their career and the responsibility of self-sacrifice so that others could have the life they gave up. As nice as the Nexus was at giving them the happiness they needed, they knew they had to go back and sacrifice again. In Kirk's case, ultimately.

I think that's also why they only went back as far as they did. Because they had a job to do and they while they could cheat and change things to be more ideal that's not who either of them are. They are men who sacrifice for the mission and reject the temptation of the Nexus.

Also interesting is how when they first meet in the Nexus, their differences are subtly highlighted. Kirk, the outdoorsy, manly chef, Picard a bit more intellectually focused and a bit, dare-I-say, dainty. (You can almost see Kirk mentally rolling his eyes at how the legacy of the Enterprise captain turned out; "oh, great, here's another precocious young Enterprise Captain that doesn't know a thing.") But by the end of their time together it's been shown how similar they are too.

Something else that occured to me is how Generations acts as a bookends of sort to TOS, where a DIFFERENT Enterprise Captain became trapped in a place where he was temped by his fantasies and desires after becoming disillusioned with the Starfleet life but ultimately regected it all because it wasn't real and was just a prison. Just a Cage.

Sure, the movie lacked a big bombastic villain, was more introspective and quiet and the return & final battle of James T. Kirk lacked significant punch and some necessary pathos and it didn't really live up to the meeting of generations that it promised, but thematically it's a wonderful film that really digs into the characters and does a decent job compairing and contrasting the two lead men. Which is classic RDM. The Nexus I guess is classic Braga high concept idea.

When it works, it works, when it doesn't, it doesn't. I definitely appreciated it more than I have this ladt viewing, and I always liked it. But I think First Contact is still the better movie. It succeeded more at what it was trying to be while Generations is a _little_ scattered.
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Nolan
Thu, Jan 14, 2021, 5:16am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: In the Pale Moonlight

Man, am I ever getting annoyed by fans of the morally darker New Star Treks pointing to this and "For the Uniform" as justifications via "whataboutism" for "Discovery," "Picard" and "Lower Decks"'s reprehensible moral codes. These were the EXCEPTIONS to for Sisko, while being the rule for those series.

Here is a whole EPISODE about Sisko reflecting on the damage he did and trying to come to an "ends justifying the means" reasoning, with his success in doing so VERY much in doubt. Characters in the new Trek don't even bat a friggin' eye at wanton murder.

As for "For the Uniform" there's a whole tizzy about chemical warefare on civilians. Admittedly, not a good look, but also ignoring complete situational context. That was a COLONY world. By it's very nature such a world would not have large numbers of infirm upon it because it's not a difficult supposition to make that only able-bodies and fit people would sign up for frontier colonization, given that it would likely entail large amounts of physically demanding work. That plus the fact there was ample evacuation time and a whole other planet close by to evacuate to, makes Sisko's decision to do this, while not a great action, not the murderous genocide some make it out to be.

And then there's the whole Dominion War. And if you need me to explain the difference between a period of sustained conflict against a singular enemy faction seeking to annihilate you with superior tech and numbers versus vaprizing every opponent in every hostile encounter, (when you have STUN settings no less) be it a gang of bounty hunters or an enemy vessel, then I really have to wonder what's wrong with you. Preferably we'd all want to do our best to avoid either, but the new Treks don't even try, or feel remorse. Not when they're too busy feeling fully justified for every murder because they tell themselves they have the moral high ground and were RIGHT. Pretty sure that thinking is what's lead to every religious conflict ever.

Can't wait for Kurtzman's new Trek series, Star Trek: Crusades, where the plucky, failed upwards captain who is brave enough to show their feelings at every oppertunity leaves the Alpha through Gamma Quadrents awash in the blood of those that refused to come around to the Federations dogmatic, moralistic way of thinking. It'll be a real barn-buster of an action romp thst promises to truely resonate with 4% of it's audience and pats them on the head dhile telling them how right THEY are. Gaw, I wouldn't put it past him, I really wouldn't.
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