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Max
Thu, Mar 7, 2019, 5:58am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: Identity, Part II

"Brainless" is probably best left without quotation marks (I was quoting OTDP) because Jammer didn't call it that in the review.

I too did not see any problem with the Krill entering the battle. It had nothing to do with Avis and everything to do with self-preservation.

The show still stands up to much more scrutiny than Discovery, which as others have noticed Jammer doesn't like to scrutinize much despite pointing out that Orville is much less serious.
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Max
Fri, Mar 1, 2019, 3:38am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: Identity, Part II

One could actually view the Kaylon plan to invade Earth as an emotional reaction to what happened to them. Their reasoning for being unsympathetic towards objections that humans are not like the Kaylons' enslavers was that humans had enslaved in their past too. An emotionless robot wouldn't care how innocent the humans were, the practical goal would be all that mattered. They clearly have a sense of justice and that comes from empathy.
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Max
Fri, Mar 1, 2019, 3:06am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S2: Light and Shadows

Anyone else always get a headache after watching this show?
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Gaius Maximus
Thu, Dec 20, 2018, 9:32pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: Elaan of Troyius

Some pretty ugly sexism in this one, with Kirk threatening to spank Elaan and commenting that Vulcan women are the only logical women in the galaxy. Also, some uncomfortable 'dragon lady' overtones with an East Asian actress in this part. What I really wonder, though, is why it was so damn dark on the bridge in this episode?
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Gaius Maximus
Thu, Mar 22, 2018, 6:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Heart of Glory

A pretty good episode, especially for Season 1, but it bothered me how long Picard spends marveling over Geordi's VISORvision in a dangerous situation. Bet he would have regretted that if he'd gone on a minute longer and it led to losing half his senior staff when the freighter blew up before they could beam back. I also wonder if the third Klingon might have had a better chance for survival if the away team had gotten to work right away instead of chatting.

When I was a young kid watching for the first time, I thought for a long time that the Klingons had actually joined the Federation rather than just allying, and seeing things like the Federation symbol on the Klingon transmission makes me understand why.
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Gaius Maximus
Fri, Jan 19, 2018, 11:39pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: The Immunity Syndrome

There was another all-Vulcan ship on DS9. It was the one whose captain was Sisko's old rival and they played a baseball game against in Season 7.

According to Memory Alpha, it was also mentioned on TNG that the Hera, the ship commanded by Geordi's mother, had mostly, (but obviously not entirely), Vulcan crew. Makes you wonder what the crew dynamics would be like on a ship full of Vulcans commanded by a human.
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MaxHeadroom
Sun, Dec 20, 2015, 7:52pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Treachery, Faith, and the Great River

This was a great episode, though I sort of wish he hadn't died at the end. I always wondered why he couldn't have simply pretended to activate his suicide implant. It's not like they had any way to know.
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Max
Wed, Dec 16, 2015, 4:58pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Wrongs Darker Than Death or Night

I was hoping when she got back to the future one of the first things she would do would be to track down Basso and make him pay for what he did. Of course he was probably dead by then but it would have felt nice to see him get his comeuppance. He was such a sleazeball.
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Max
Tue, Dec 15, 2015, 9:56am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Resurrection

One of my least favorite episodes of DS9, would not watch again. So incredibly boring, is this Star Trek or Days of Our Lives?
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Max
Mon, Nov 23, 2015, 9:12am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Ashes to Ashes

I'm also wondering how she caught up with Voyager? Aside from the distance they would have traveled in 2 years at warp, didn't they also use the subspace slingshot device during that time?
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Max
Thu, Sep 3, 2015, 9:26am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: Yesterday's Enterprise

@Roman - I think you underestimate the trust Picard has for Guinan. Guinan's "hunches" are always spot-on, which I've always assumed, for lack of a better explanation, is because of the species she comes from.

I honestly don't think Picard would have gone through with the Enterprise-C going back in time if it hadn't been for Guinan saying it was absolutely necessary. This nagged at him, and changed his perception enough that instead of sending the Enterprise-C into battle (which it was clear they WERE going to do, whether or not the ship would have been "hopeless" in such a battle), he actually took time to think about his decision at many levels, and then finally decided that if there was a chance that the Enterprise-C could "fix" the timeline, it should be sent back.

As someone on the thread said before, the temporal prime directive would apply here, even if the concept itself didn't really exist at this point in Trek. Because Picard had an idea that he was FIXING the timeline rather than deliberately changing it, he was willing to do it. And the idea of fixing the timeline came directly from Guinan. Logic, in this instance, could have gone either way. It was Guinan's certainty that made Picard decide to do what he did.
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Max
Thu, Sep 3, 2015, 9:13am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: Deja Q

I'm sorry, but the Mariachi band was completely hilarious. It was such a Q thing to do - stupid and genuine all at the same time, and completely embarrassing for the bridge crew. I actually laughed out loud when that happened. Plus, you know, the cigars, and the beautiful women. It was funny, dammit.

I definitely think this episode deserves the full 4 stars. I can't think of a part I didn't like or appreciate in some way. And there is a lot of depth here, which is what I enjoy most in a Trek episode.
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Maxwell Anderson
Thu, Nov 13, 2014, 8:09pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Course: Oblivion

This stands up there with Tuvix as among the very best of Voyager, and among the best of Star Trek ever. To have these conscious lifeforms struggle with their own identity, their purpose, then to have them die like that at the end, without any record or memory of them ever having existed, it just really struck me emotionally. Its one of the few times that Star Trek dares not have a silver lining or greater meaning, or anything positive that can come out of this story. All there is in the end is space dust. Truly dark, powerful stuff, and very daring writing.
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Maximillian
Sun, Sep 28, 2014, 5:33pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: The Menagerie

"when he is looking once again at the image of Vina and realizes he does have a chance to "live" a normal life again"

I wonder also that Pike had fallen in love with Vena, and part of the reaction was accordingly.
(Susan Oliver was striking btw).

I would have made it far more romantic, and touching, where Kirk asks "Chris, do you want to go there ?"

Instead, "Chris, do you want go there, and be with her ?"

The eternal love of a man for a woman, is dealt
directly from God.

I think they just missed the boat there.
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Max Udargo
Thu, Jul 24, 2014, 1:09am (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: He That Believeth in Me

@D. Albert

Excellent analysis of the fundamental problem that undermined the series at it moved along. The key word here is "lazy," I think.
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max
Sat, Jun 7, 2014, 12:10pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Nothing Human

I'd like to note, that real world model for this episode would be rather Japanese Unit 731 than Nazis. Nazis, although cruel and inhumane, were like kids in playground compared to these oriental butchers.
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Maxo
Fri, May 9, 2014, 2:57pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: For the Uniform

Wow, I just watched this episode and I was shocked. I'm going to pretend this episode just didn't happen.

Sisco committed war crimes and his crew didn't even object to the orders much less refuse to follow them.

That's where the episode either became completely unbelievable or Sisco really did become a villain and the story shouldn't be about him any more.

Worf should have refused to follow the orders. Where is the honor in poisoning the planet.

Kira should have refused to follow the orders.

This show should have been about the crew refusing to carry out the orders and Sisco realizing he really had lost it. Then he could have spent the next few episodes getting his moral feet back under him.

Final point: there is no way someone on the planet didn't die from the poison. You can't evacuate an entire planet and not lose at least one person. You can't even evacuate a city irl without having a half dozen to a dozen deaths.

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Maxwell Anderson
Wed, Mar 19, 2014, 1:41am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Dark Frontier

I agree with DLPB. Too many of the comments here focus on the continuity errors. Continuity with TNG is a problem in this episode, however, this pales in comparison to the biggest problem with this episode, which is the Borg's inability to combat Janeway's away teams. It just doesn't make sense that they would be so vulnerable to attack. It makes sense on TNG that they don't consider them a threat when they beam over and look around with their Type 1 phasers in their holsters, but when Janeway sends multiple teams over at once, with Type 3 phasers drawn and Harry Kim planting bombs, they should be responding aggressively. Instead they just carry on with their everyday maintenance.

And why oh why do they not assimilate Seven and Janeway at the end? The queen spends an eternity talking about how Voyager is inferior and they will be defeated, but they are just standing around doing nothing, for ages. It just doesn't make sense.

And why does Janeway have to only blast one node for the Borg to lose their ability to keep shields? The writers do not take basic story logic into account, and the result is a depiction of the Borg as inept idiots.

I could buy a story where they kidnap Seven and try to convince her to stay with the Borg as an individual, for the reasons Joseph B states, and also perhaps because they are trying to win the "hearts and minds" of humans as a way of validating their way of life, which could be quite interesting. But the writers fail to explore this idea at all, instead having the Borg queen try to force Seven to think like a drone even though they refuse to assimilate her. This basic illogic hurt the credibility of the story immeasurably.
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Maxwell Anderson
Wed, Jan 15, 2014, 12:57pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Someone to Watch Over Me

Best episode of the series. Everything works beautifully.
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Maxwell Anderson
Wed, Jan 15, 2014, 12:51pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

I loved this episode because it ends on a note of real uncertainty. Very rarely has Voyager deliberately left Big Questions unresolved, respecting the audience enough to ask them to hash it for themselves. Another episode that comes to mind is Sacred Ground, where Janeway's unwavering faith in science is seriously questioned and ends on an unresolved note. I also am thinking of Course: Oblivion, because of how dark and complex the show actually gets at the end, and we are left to ponder the value of life and history and memory.
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Maxwell Anderson
Wed, Jan 15, 2014, 12:38pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Survival Instinct

Of course they are "free" to do whatever they want. But what they did on Voyager was to fundamentally and without explanation reverse the organizational system from bottom up to top down, thus rendering them much much easier to defeat. I don't think I'm alone in criticizing the writers for choosing this path.

And yes, of course they could, "dramatically speaking", take the Borg in a direction that preserved the strength of their collective and that was more consistent with depictions in TNG and First Contact. (As I explained in my original post, the queen in First Contact was a mouthpiece, and nothing in the plot of that movie violated the organizational principles established in TNG. The problem starts in Voyager Dark Frontier.)
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Maxwell Anderson
Sun, Jan 5, 2014, 1:07pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Survival Instinct

I agree with EP. Voyager just fundamentally misunderstood the Borg in how they characterized them. The biggest thing is about the organization of the hive and of the cubes. It is established in TNG that the technological systems are spread out evenly with many redundancies throughout their cubes, so that if one is damaged, absolutely no vital systems get compromised. This ability to adapt and regenerate is what makes the cubes so scary and why the Borg are so hard to defeat. (I thought it was very clever how Michael Piller wrote the end of Best of Both Worlds - tapping into the mind and telling them it's time to sleep - in part because it does not violate this technological principle). In contrast, this principle is routinely violated in Voyager as the writers would usually end episodes with Janeway targeting some central hub that controlled everything so they could disable the cube. And in First Contact they establish that the queen is simply a mouthpiece for the collective, the billions-of-voices-as-one-voice manifest. However, Voyager constantly describes functions of the Borg as being "controlled" by the queen, or various queens, and if one is killed or disabled this can render the Borg defenseless somehow. This is just a fundamental misunderstanding of how the Borg work. If the queen is killed, the Borg can just make another one. They don't even need a queen. They all think in One Voice, right? The queen is simply there to better communicate with individuals outside the hive.

They also establish in TNG that when disconnected from the hive, drones become totally lost, unable to truly take care of themselves, destined to die without reconnection to the hive. This provides an understandable motivation for each drone's unquestioning devotion to the hive: without it, they will die. Here, however, Ron Moore inexplicably writes that when disconnected from the hive, drones immediately start remembering their former lives and thinking like individuals again. This is not the Borg I know from TNG! I would imagine the Borg drones in such a situation would act as a group to try to rejoin the collective, and not let anyone get in their way. I'm sure disagreement could ensue among the group, given their newly individual natures, and this could be interesting. But this is not at all what Moore writes here.
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Maxwell Anderson
Sat, Jan 4, 2014, 2:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: One Small Step

Nic, I think Grumpy is right with regards to real life, but the point you raise can be applied to Star Trek away mission protocol generally, going back all the way to TOS. Small group away missions routinely involve the entire group beaming down to a strange planet all at once, leaving nobody to man the shuttlecraft. Then, the rest of the episode usually is about trying to back to the shuttlecraft after encountering a hostile force. Just a really bone-headed policy that they never get right.
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Maxwell Anderson
Fri, Jan 3, 2014, 3:42am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Human Error

I agree with Elliott. Excellent episode. I only wish it went on longer and we saw how Seven dealt with this tragic blow to her sense of self. Haven't seen the subsequent episodes yet. I can only hope Voyager does what it usually doesn't do and follows up.
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Maxwell Anderson
Wed, Jan 1, 2014, 5:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Barge of the Dead

I completely agree with Ken and others. The problem with this episode is that for one episode only, B'Elanna suddenly believes in the literal truth of Klingon religious texts, which is completely inconsistent with how her character has been established in earlier episodes. Now, I am willing to believe that her experience and interaction with her mother could force a change in her character, and that is in essence the challenge for the writers to take us on that journey, but they fail miserably. She just starts believing in it. We don't see her doubts slowly erode or her natural skepticism struggle against her need to deal with the guilt she feels for falling out with her mother. Her transformation is just far too fast, unexplained, and easy. This is a recurring problem with the writing on this show. Ronald D. Moore or no Ronald D. Moore, this episode stunk!
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