Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:
Clear bookmark | How bookmarks work
Note: Bookmarks are ignored for all search results

Total Found: 30 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 2
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Sat, Jan 12, 2019, 5:23am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Home

Alara is one of the best characters on the show simply because she's played mostly straight (and one of the only officers on board who call the captain "captain" and not "Ed"). Having said that, she is underdeveloped, so the fact they made her farewell so touching in the final scene is a big accomplishment. Personally I felt that the scene worked on two levels, the characters saying goodbye to Alara, but also the cast members saying goodbye to their fellow actor. There was something very real about it.

There seems to be all kind of different information online regarding why Halston Sage left the show, some say it's because she was dating Seth, some say it's because of scheduling conflicts. Hard to know what's what. (On a side note, and this is based on info from IMDB Trivia for this episode, are actors really not allowed to be romantically attached to crew members anymore on sets? By that logic, about 30-40 percent of movies would be shut down mid-production or suffer great delays, just some examples: To Have and To Hold, Mr. and Mrs. Smith, The Fountain, Black Swan, Days of Thunder, etc.)

To the episode itself, the Xelayan home world was beautifully rendered in visual terms but the developing of the alien culture is lazy, they act and talk like a regular American family, have marriages and universities and beach houses and all the stuff that's familiar to us, only they have big ears and live in a world that has massive gravity. That's it. Didn't Superman live on such a world as well?

The mid-episode twist caught me off guard and was executed very well, successfully using the caretaker as the red herring. It was also a little toooo convenient, how this all happens two days after Alara reunites with her family, but ok. For the most part it works.

The scenes with the new security officer with the double-esophgus were I felt completely unnecessary an in a rare occurrence for this show, fell completely flat when it came to the comedy. I could hardly understand what he was saying and I've had my fill with all these "bro" characters that keep appearing on this show, such as Dann and the porno dealer from last episode. Not because they are "bros", but because they all speak and act the same. I hope this is not the new replacement for Alara!

The pickle jar reference at the end was a little too obtuse. I had to go online to see what it meant.

Three stars from me, one whole star for the end scene.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Jan 7, 2019, 3:53am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Primal Urges

Charles, I could not agree with you more.

I find Kelly's comment funny.
I found Ed's stalking via a shuttle funny.
But it *needs* to be this kind of show at least 90 percent of the time for it to feel really organic.

While "this ship is gross" comment made me laugh, the scene does undermine the tone of the show yet again. And as I mentioned before this is a recurring issue with this show for me, that while in the moment it can be quite funny, when you think about it in retrospect it feels problematic.

I think the discussion about humor and whether one "gets it" or not is very relevant here. While I like Family Guy, both shows have similar problems, where characters will almost always be sacrificed for a joke. So Family Guy has no character development to speak of, which is OK by me in an animated sitcom, but here it's more jarring. Good humor should arise naturally from the situation. But The Orville has too many random jokes and characters speaking like extras from Family Guy. The reason I absolutely loved Cupid's Dagger from last season was because its premise was humorous to begin with and it was played to the hilt. Now, your mileage may vary whether you find these kinds of shenanigans funny, but the point here is that the humor was natural to the story and was not inserted randomly.

So yeah, when you see these staff meetings and Gordon says how he "went to town this morning" you know you are not on the Enterprise and that this is a different show.
But then, on the next scene, the episode tries really hard to sell you that it is like sort-of the Enterprise, or Voyager. So you're confused. Who are these people really? what is their relationship to one another? Is there any kind of military hierarchy or is it just random? What are the "rules" here? The Orville seems to be making it up as it goes along.

Set Bookmark
Lynos
Sun, Jan 6, 2019, 5:10pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Primal Urges

I was happy to see The Orville finally tackling the big elephant in the room: using a holodeck-like technology for sexual gratification. We all know that once this technology become a reality, this will be one of its first uses. Just like it happened with the internet.

A few thoughts:

- I did not wholly buy the "I divorce you so I stab you in the heart" plot line. It was a little too out there to be played straight.
- The full-body makeup on Bortus and the other Moclans in the simulation. Wow.
Ditto for the visual effects. This show does not hold back when it comes to production value.
- Even though it was amusing, the scene where the virus needs to be eracticated while the simulation is active felt contrived. I didn't see why it couldn't be shut off. Oh yeah, because of the joke.
- Kelly's delivery of the line "this ship is gross" was perfect.
- Two guys went from the cave into the radiation outside without a suit. What?
- The Kermit the Frog doll on Ed's desk is distracting.
- The Orville has only 300 people onboard. It's certainly not the Enterprise.

All in all I agree with Jamar's opinion, it was just okay. But the series continues to be highly watchable even if it's not stellar.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 2:08am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Ja'loja

Thanks to everyone above who set things straight regarding if this was a holdover from season 1 or not.
In any case, even if it's not, I still hope the show manages to find a more consistent tone this season and run with it.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Wed, Jan 2, 2019, 2:28am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Ja'loja

Yeah, I love Isaac. It's a thinly veiled version of Data but it's done so well.

Okay, I'm learning here in the comments that this episode was actually a season 1 episode? Is this true? If so, it can explain why it feels like a season 1 episode! Like nothing had changed.
So I am still hoping for some innovations in the writing department for season 2. The only way this feels like a season opener is by having a new character join the team. Also, as mentioned above, the Amok Time parody puts is squarely as a season 2 opener. So it's very interesting to know that it's actually not, and I wonder why they decided to use it as such apart from the above. Was it just to "get it over with" because it's an old episode?

It's also apparent to me like it or not this is a show with a single creative vision, even if last season was written by different people the episodes always had the "Seth touch". In that aspect it reminds me mostly of TOS and not TNG.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Tue, Jan 1, 2019, 2:57pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Ja'loja

Woo, The Orville is back, and I immediately came here after watching to see if Jammer's written anything and was not disappointed!

Seth MacFarlane seems to be doing the same shtick for season 2. It always feels like he wants to say something profound but then can't help himself and puts in the jokes.
I thought it could be quite fascinating to see a whole episode centered on The Great Release but it was quickly apparent it was not actually the focus of the show. A shame.

It was a mediocre episode but I laughed quite a bit, I can't lie. I find that I enjoy The Orville the most when I approach it as a comedy show, despite the fact it has the format of a drama. That's the only way I'm not bugged by how everyone speaks like contemporary people (even the aliens) or make contemporary references, as if pop culture or culture in general ceased to exist between our time and The Orville's time. As a comedic take on Trek, it's highly amusing. As a straight Sci-Fi show, not so much.

Last season was tonally all over the place, but it still gave you that giddy feeling of watching TNG all over again. The thing is, I don't think the series can ride on this nostalgia wave forever. It needs to decide what it wants to be, or it will get really old really fast.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Feb 12, 2018, 4:04pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Will You Take My Hand?

Well, I wish the series started the way it ended, with this warm ode to Starfleet and seeing the Enterprise, an almost shameful way to make sure everyone gets back to season 2... and you know you're all coming back.

The solution to the Klingon war didn't make much sense to me, to be honest. It felt a little too convenient.
And even if the Discovery crew prevented the annihilation of Kronos, the fact remains Starfleet brass still agreed to this plan and were perfectly ready to execute it. This whole thing was glossed over. All it took was one passionate speech, and more ambiguities were non-existent.

It was nice seeing the Orions again, so one-note but so entertaining.

Decent episode, but the whole season/series was very problematic. Let's hope it gets a little better in season 2.

Still an amazing-looking show, though.

Set Bookmark
Lynos
Tue, Feb 6, 2018, 11:20am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The War Without, The War Within

Not sure if this was ever mentioned in the forums, but the Netflix airing of this show includeד the option to watch it with Klingon subtitles. That's a cute touch.

If only the show itself had exhibited the same kind levity once in a while... could this be the most serious Trek show ever made?
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Tue, Jan 30, 2018, 8:48am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: What's Past Is Prologue

Regarding the whereabouts of PU Lorca:

Wasn't he supposed to have been killed on the Borian along with his crew, then? Or maybe the two Lorcas switched places and PU Lorca is now dead over the the MU?

The whole thing is a head-scratcher. It wasn't really explained how Evil Lorca got to the position of captaining Discovery after he switched universes. If there were two Lorcas in starfleet it wouldn't have been possible, obviously. Did he just beam into Discovery, switched places with the original captain, and that was that?

In any case, I would not be surprised if he showed up again. It seems like everybody who dies on this show comes back at one point or another.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Tue, Jan 30, 2018, 3:00am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: What's Past Is Prologue

According to IMDB at least, there are two episodes left.

The small green spore: I only saw it as a visual flourish. It's interesting that people here are attributing some kind of significance to it. I was like, "oh, that's some great visual poetry for a TV show!" Honestly, I think Lorca entering Tilly as a spore is a little ridiculous, but after the last episode, I wouldn't put anything past this show. That's why I keep watching!
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Jan 29, 2018, 4:50pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: What's Past Is Prologue

I do wish these comments were editable....

I meant Brian Fuller, of course. Freuidian slip? Nah, I respect the man.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Jan 29, 2018, 4:47pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: What's Past Is Prologue

@Trent

"Isn't the MU Discovery in the Prime Universe now? "

I posed the same question. If I followed the plot correctly (and don't be so sure), there should be another Mirror Universe Discovery somewhere out there.

Also, what was the point of the whole Defiant storyline? It went absolutey nowhere (at least so far). I remember Brian Fooler hinting that Disocvery will have a connection to an incident from the TOS days. Obviously he meant this, but it was brought up... and then dropped, switching to Lorca and Co. planning to Take Over The World. And since Discovery no longer need to escape the Mirror Universe... it seems that angle is done. Except... Klingons winning the war against the Federation 10 years before Kirk? This does not fit TOS Universe. So if they are still in MU, perhaps we have not heard the last of the Defiant.

Just speculating here. Trying to make sense of the plotting of this show.

Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Jan 29, 2018, 2:20pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: What's Past Is Prologue

Oh, and I forgot to mention the best cartoony element of them all:

"If we don't shoot this thing, all life on all universes will cease to exist!!!!!!"

By the way, where's Mirror Universe Discovery? I lost track.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Jan 29, 2018, 2:11pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: What's Past Is Prologue

Finally, a somewhat cartoony episode as befits the Mirror Universe. the bad guys were Really Bad and Evil. Very well paced. But I find it pretty funny that Lorca was working on his plan for what must have been months and months only to be defeated in a matter of mere hours, it seems.

I have a problem with action scenes that start with someone kicking someone's leg or pushing their arm in order to get the advantage. It's such a cliche. Here it happened not once but twice. You would think the Bad Guys would have better reflexes. And the way the Empress beat the S**t out of Lorca. Man, she must be working out a lot. but I would really give Discovery a pass on that, considering the only other show that had copious amount of action scenes was TOS and those were much worse.

I'm not sure what the name of the Discovery's security officer/Lorca's henchwoman is, but there was not much difference between her Mirror Universe and her Prime Universe personality.

I liked Burnham's line, "we would have helped you if you asked. That's Starfleet. That's me." Too bad there's so little of these Trekkian sentiments on the show.

Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Jan 22, 2018, 4:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Vaulting Ambition

@Todd

If so, why did it take Discovery 10 episodes to get there?
The same point was made in stand-alone shows or previous Star Trek series.

My issue with Discovery is that as a serialized show, it seems to be aimless. Not aimless in that it doesn't know what it want the plot to be, but aimless in that it doesn't know what it wants to be about. TAS and TNG, and Enterprise were about exploration. DS9 was about diplomacy and the mingling of different alien cultures in one place. Voyager was about resourcefullness (at least in the beginning, before it became another TNG). Discovery is about... what? At first, it seemed to focus on Burnham's character and its story, now the focus switched to the Mirror Universe, and it seems now it's going to center on Lorca...?

Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Jan 22, 2018, 3:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Vaulting Ambition

Can someone be kind and explain to me what this show is about? Week after week I watch it, because it's called Star Trek, and I still don't get what it's about. It looks great, very well made, some good acting, but it's so hollow. The Mycelian network? So? I mean, other than showing off how cool and progressive it is (female African-American protaginise with a male name! A gay couple!) it's just reveling in gore and despair while bringing very little of value to the table. It's focusing on empty plot machinations and cliffhangers designed to make you keep coming for more. Where are the philosophical ideas, the humanity, the social commenatry, all the stuff the best Trek is known for? I'm fine with mindless action-adventure once in a while, but... I just don't get it. Every episode, people screaming, being tortured... either without (Lorca) or within (Tyler). God almighty, someone crack a smile already.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 1:50pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: Mad Idolatry

Well, I found this talk on YouTube that the creators did at Google, and Seth says there that he was going for a casual atmosphere on the spaceship, so it is what is. It's just that the series is so TNG in its style that I find it unnerving where there are elements that are so different. The Orville is just doing a too good of a job being TNG...

Here's the talk if anyone's interested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7N54eNGRDH8
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 6:04am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: Mad Idolatry

I beleive the cloaking shuttle was seen in Majority Rule.

I don't subscribe to the fact that faith in itself is a negative thing. you can have faith in a higher power or in spiritual principles and still be a decent and loving human being.
It's what people do with the concept of faith and how they eploit it that makes relegions destructive.

Set Bookmark
Lynos
Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 2:50am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: Mad Idolatry

@Henson: if that is the case, then the episode should have made it clearer. They have made a big deal about sending Isaac to spend 700 years on the planet, only for him to return and say "hey it wasn't needed, they got along without me" and then the glowing people (neat effect) just explained everything in a few lines of dialogue.

Even if the aliens would have had something else to attach themselves to and beleive in other than Kelly, it was still Kelly that instigated the whole thing with her utter carelessness, and the fact that her responibility is brushed off in such a way by the end of the episode makes the whole story moot. If you are dealing with such a dramatic and world-altering concept, than go all the way with it. I can see why they would want to hit the restet button, since the tone of the show is lighthearted. But I find that the comedy keeps getting in the way of the dramatic concepts being presented, unless we are talking about a pure comedy script as in Cupid's Dagger. TOS for example was able to pull off comedic episodes next to dramatic episodes without damaging the series as a whole.

I am also struck by the fact how informal the crew of the Orville is. The series may copy TNG in almost every respect, but not here. The chain of command is much less strict then in TNG (Gordon opening the door to Mercer and saying to his captain "hey man", a scantily clad ensign is standing in front of ther captain not bothering to cover herself up), but then again, in other scenes, they use "yes captain" and "aye sir". It's odd.

The Orville certainly has an identity crisis at this point. But there is something trully fascinating about this show, just as an artistic experiment, so I can't wait for season 2.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Fri, Dec 8, 2017, 4:23pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: Mad Idolatry

Interesting take on TNG's Who Watches The Watchers, but the ending was too pat and hurried. And how did Isaac manage to influence them exactly?

Also, felt most of the humor didn't really work this time around. Interesting concept. Could've been done better.

The season had ended and my favorite episode of the season remains Cupid's Dagger, with Krill, About a Girl and Firestorm as possible runners up.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Mon, Dec 4, 2017, 3:36am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: New Dimensions

Actually, some of the things first featured on Trek already exist in some form in the real world. A cell phone is a version of the communicator, and as for replicators and such, we already have printers that can turn simple digital non-organic information into a 3D physical object.

This is not saying all technology on Trek will be available to us in real life, but they are not batting on zero.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Sun, Dec 3, 2017, 10:21am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: New Dimensions

@SlackerInc

I was comparing Orville to TNG more than to TOS. But no, the accents in TOs didn't bother me.
It's more about the all-american speech, how everybody sound the same even if they're aliens, than about accents.

I guess it's when some of the aliens talk like that, that I find it especially distracting. Prime example was Darulio from Cupid's Dagger. It felt kind of lazy in an otherwise stellar episode. (also, it's not just about speech, there's body language involved as well. In short, there was nothing alien about him other than his blue face).
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Sat, Dec 2, 2017, 3:18am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: New Dimensions

@SlackerInc
It's not really what they say on TNG, it's what they don't say. Of course we have no way to actually know how people will speak in the 24th century and most probably it won't be English anyway, or even more likely communication will be mostly telepthatic and not use sounds at all (I'm just riffing here), but for sake of us viewers being able to follow, they do speak English in the 24th century in Star Trek but they use neutral, clean English, no slang, no pop culture references, and no specific accents (except for Picard).

In The Orville, on the contrary, other than Bortos and Issac, everybody has this american drawl, even the aliens such as Yaphet, The Blue Guy from two episodes ago, and Elevator Music Guy. They all sound the same, and I know it's a Seth McPharlane thing, because many characters in Family Guy have the same drawl in their speech, you can have a cut-away to a talking banana and it will sound like a mid-western cowboy. It could also be that many of these voice actors also appear in Orville.

So I personally find it distarcting. Not sure if to call it "unbeleivable" since it's a comedy, but it's distracting.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Fri, Dec 1, 2017, 5:08pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: New Dimensions

Some good character development, but I have to say that in the case of Lammar it was hard to suspend disbieleif. Senior staff is only checking their chief navigator's personal file now? And I didn't really buy Lammar's explanation for hiding his IQ.
I wonder if this character twist was a decision that was decided half-way through the season or if it was something that was there from the beginning. I suspect the former, but who knows. Also, I don't think the actor sells it. The transformation was just too quick.

The 2-D world reminded me of a video game. It was very Pacmanish. But it did ooze a sense of wonder, so they pulled it off in that regard.

Not sure how much I like the fact everyone on this show speak and joke and reference like a 2017 human. If anything, it makes me appreicate more the dialogue in TNG. Those people really sounded like guys from the 24th century while still being relatable.

Decent episode. But I liked the previous two better.

Best gag: the bloody noses.
Set Bookmark
Lynos
Wed, Nov 29, 2017, 10:07am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: Firestorm

I think your points are valid but most of them come to the surface in retrospect. The episode works as a stand-alone, well-made adventure with a twist, with admittedly lower re-watch value. The series seems to be wavering betwen serious character analysis and willing to sell its characters for some jokes, Family Guy had the same problem when it tried to do character development.

But I think Orville is getting better and more coherent with time. I think the intention here is to ultimatley be a more serious and thoughtful show and not as zany as Family Guy.
Next ►Page 1 of 2
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2019 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.