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Lt. Fitz
Sat, Jul 7, 2012, 5:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Chimera

I really liked the explanation of why humanoids need love. It's lonely in here.
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Lt. Fitz
Thu, Jul 5, 2012, 1:22pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Shadows and Symbols

I don't get it. I watched the very first episodes after watching this one, because it seemed to me that the prophets were being very inconsistent. In the first episodes, the prophets don’t know what linear time is. They don’t seem to know what Sisko is. They even conclude that he must be destroyed! He has to argue with them to save himself! Now, late in the series they are written to have reached far across the quadrant to take control of a human woman to produce Sisko himself. Making Sisko what exactly? A human/prophet hybrid? The son of the gods? The savior of the wormhole? To do all this, it seems to me a species needs to have a pretty firm grip on what linear time is. It’s clear that the writers have gone too far with the whole emissary thing. Throughout the series it seemed like they were really pushing to go too far with it, and in this episode, they finally did it.

I now understand why a lot of Trek fans had problems with DS9. It was mostly working for me when I could frame the prophets as a difficult-to-comprehend race of aliens that the Bajorans were mistaking for gods who must have been inadvertently interacting with the Bajorans simply because their planet was in the vicinity of one end of the wormhole. But now, I don’t know what to think. Their nature is so inconsistent that they have become completely inconceivable to me. When a story includes such inconsistency, it strikes me as carelessly written. Even the most bizarre circumstances in the previous series could always be explained in general scientific terms within the rules of the Star Trek universe as it had been defined. But in the DS9 universe, literally anything can happen and no explanation is required. DS9 definitely took Star Trek from science fiction to space fantasy, which is a bit of a downer for me since I greatly preferred Star Trek being science fiction. If I wanted space fantasy, I could always turn to Star Wars.

This is not to say that I dislike DS9. I generally like it. But, as I read someone else comment, it’s not really Star Trek. I just wish that it would have remained consistent within its unique universe, but it really didn’t.
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Lt. Fitz
Tue, Jul 3, 2012, 11:36pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: The Sound of Her Voice

This episode kept putting me to sleep, but it wasn't a bad episode. It was just very talky. Odo's unexpected allowance seemed unrealistic, even if it was satisfying to a certain extent.
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Lt. Fitz
Sun, Jul 1, 2012, 7:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Valiant

I'm getting pretty fed up with how battle damage works in Star Trek. I am sick of the searing sound effects whenever a bunch of sparks explode from the computer panels. I am sick of people dying simply because they were forced form their seat onto the floor. I am sick of ships taking any damage at all until the shields are completely gone. At least a couple of times an exploding panel has killed people before the shields were down. I know. They need people to die without a hull breach sucking everyone else out of the room, but it's just getting so unbelievable. And, as others have said, it makes me crazy that starships are so hard to destroy when the story needs them to be hard to destroy. Also, if torpedoes have homing mechanisms and phasers are always used with locking, why is there ever a miss? I understand that guidance and locking systems can go down, but several times in DS9 battles, the enemy ships miss when they haven't yet taken any damage.

The Jem Hadar ship was damned impressive, though. I think that it could have taken out the valiant with about 12-15 well-placed quantum torpedoes. I should go back to see how many times the Valiant was hit before it exploded.
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Lt. Fitz
Sun, Jul 1, 2012, 4:12pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: His Way

I was disappointed with this episode only because I felt that that it was a too silly and forced ending to the Odo/Kira love saga. I wanted to see them in some sort of serious situation that perhaps caused one of them to save the life of the other, and in doing so, realize how profoundly he or she would have missed the other if they were lost. There is nothing like lives in danger to really make us want to act on those things that we are putting off out of insecurity. I really wanted to see Kira deal with any sort of misgivings she might have about choosing to be romantically involved with a creature so unlike herself (how would making love work, anyway?). She has shown romantic interest only in Bajorans, understandably so, because it is definitely an easier and more natural route. I wanted to see something that would cause her to really be able to overcome that sort of instinctual drive we all have in our natures to be attracted to our own. Sadly, we get what the reviewer accurately described as silly sitcom fluff as well as it was executed.
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Lt. Fitz
Fri, Jun 29, 2012, 9:20am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Soldiers of the Empire

I love the Klingon episodes too. Yeah, they are violent children, but it's fun to see what the writers come up with given the rules of writing for Klingons. A bunch of men singing together in US society is kind of considered effeminate, so it surprises my sensibilities while I am watching when such a thing happens, and I like those kind of social twists. It's fun to see these tough guys break out in song.

Also, I would hardly call this episode pedestrian. I can't remember another TV episode that showed Klingon crew procedure from undocking through to the conclusion that was reached. I like to see all the little details of crews on non-federation starships, and I felt like this episode provided a lot of new interesting details.

I'd give it a solid 3 stars. There were some parts that dragged. I'd rather they had reduced the amount of time spent on Worf trying to convince the General to fight, gotten the knife fight out of he way earlier and then showed the victory over the Jem Hadar. When I realized that they were not going to show the battle, I was disappointed.
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Lt. Fitz
Wed, Jun 27, 2012, 9:02am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: Crossfire

The elevator scene really bugged me. How tall are those elevator shafts?! I felt like they had already traveled the height of the entire station BEFORE they started falling! Also, when did Odo get super strength? In any difficult situation in the past, Odo never showed any signs of being able to just push through metal walls. I remember when Kira was being engulfed in some form of crystal, he never even tried to morph into something like a pick and just break the crystal up. I figured that he didn't really have any strength, or just enough to replicate the solidity of lighter materials like bone. Suddenly, he can form steel hammers and apply tremendous amounts of pressure? That scene just seemed so over the top.

Other than that, I was really moved by Odo's troubles. I once had to watch another man win the heart of a girl I longed for. I got her in the end anyway. :)
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Lt. Fitz
Mon, Jun 25, 2012, 6:12pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: The Die Is Cast

I understand that no changeling hurts another, but why would the changeling let Garak go with Odo? That was as bad a move as letting the DS9 crew go after they had them on the founders' planet.

Awesome 2 parter. Had me on the edge of my seat, and when the Romulan said "150 ships" I fell off the couch. :)
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Lt. Fitz
Mon, Jun 25, 2012, 6:37am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Fascination

Keiko has annoyed me before, but in this episode, she finally pissed me off. I, too, was surprised when it turned out that she was not affected at all by the virus. I thought, wow, Keiko really was just being a bitch when she got off the transport. And, O'Brien was so excited to see her too. What a let down for him. Actually, it reminded me a lot of my experiences with my own ex-wife. Couldn't please her even if I gave her what she wanted. Guess that's why she's my ex.

Anyway, yeah, the whole Lwuxana thing was contrived, and, quite frankly, I had hoped I had seen the last of her when I finished watching TNG. I guess because she has been such a big part of Trek and probably owns it in some way being the widow of Gene, I have to keep putting up with her obnoxious character.

I did laugh my butt off when that annoying, smarmy sex priest tried to attack Sisko with punches that could have come from a 9-year-old girl, and Sisko just blocked them effortlessly. Then when Dax punched him out, I cheered! That's how you deal with "spiritual" frauds. I know, he's supposed to be the good priest and all, but I just can't stand self-important religious nuts who constantly speak in a calming voice and walk around in robes.
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Lt. Fitz
Mon, Jun 25, 2012, 5:26am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Defiant

I don't know. This episode didn't make any sense to me. Why couldn't the Cardassians just cripple the Defiant, take it and the logs, and punish all the Maqui aboard? Even with the revelation of hidden Cardassian ships in that sector, wouldn't they work together to deal with the Defiant? Then, I would think, that the Cardassian council or whatever would be all over the Obsidians and the hidden base. It just seemed weird that the way to deal with it would be for them to try to find out what’s going on there by reading logs off an invading ship. I mean the Cardassians are badasses. As soon as that Maqui ship was out of the way, the military should have sent all available ships to find out what the Obsidians were up to regardless of whatever would result. It just seemed weird. “Oh! We can figure out what’s going on there by examining the maqui logs!” Silly. Also, why would the rest of the Maqui crew just go along with Riker's decision to wimp out on the mission? I mean, I assume they all figured they were going to die during this mission. It's hard to imagine how they wouldn't, even of they hadn't been pursued. Then, suddenly, Riker hands the ship over to Kira and they all just go along? "OK. Let's all go back and be dealt with by Federation justice." Bull. At least some of them would still want to die destroying Cardassians, just like Kira describes good terrorists ought to do. This was another example of a sadly too typically easy and bloodless Trek solution to what could have been a glorious and complicated conflict with lots of splosions. Oh well.
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Lt. Fitz
Mon, Jun 25, 2012, 3:48am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Meridian

I can't believe no one seems to notice the biggest problem with this episode. Why are the administrators of a space station out doing exploration? And on an unstable prototype warship? Isn't that the job of people like Picard and ships like the Enterprise? I understand that there is only so much that can happen on a space station, but having the lead doctor of a space station out on exploration missions seems totally wrong.

Oh, and yeah, I didn't believe that Dax would do this at all. Hundreds of years of life and still hasn't learned not to throw everything away on a quickly-developed infatuation?
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Lt. Fitz
Mon, Jun 25, 2012, 2:01am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Civil Defense

The whole premise of the automated lock down of the station, pour in gas, set up the autodestruct, and the SURPRISE! trap the Cardassian leader of the station for his inability to get his automated security program to work was completely absurd. Secret automation top of secret automation! Totally incredible. And, as another commenter mentioned, this should have been a very early episode - like episode 3. It was impossible for me to believe that such programs would still exist anywhere on the station.
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