Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:
Clear bookmark | How bookmarks work
Note: Bookmarks are ignored for all search results

Total Found: 1,857 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 75
Set Bookmark
William
Fri, Sep 13, 2019, 8:54am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Seventh Season Recap

I have to say, it's been a pleasure to watch DS9 with Jammer. I know I'm a few years late, but watching one episode at the time, and reading your reviews, it was a wonderful experience. DS9 blew my mind too, much more than TNG (I skipped TOS, sorry bout it).

Thank you for the amazing times and see you on the Voyager section!
Set Bookmark
William B
Wed, Sep 4, 2019, 2:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Redemption, Part II

@Chrome, the explanation was that the Doctor needed to make that special suit to help with her vitals or something. It was pretty stupid. Fortunately, as you allude to the Seven character was actually well done -- Jeri Ryan in particular was fantastic. The main thing that's notable is that the visual presentation was largely at odds with the story. OK -- of course we can see why Seven wouldn't notice or mind the weird outfit she's wearing. But it still conveys something weird, doesn't relate to her character, and it's uncomfortable because Seven is basically a child emotionally.
Set Bookmark
William B
Wed, Sep 4, 2019, 1:32pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Redemption, Part II

I meant to add, certainly by Generations [spoiler?] they were pretty overt that the Duras Sisters were not exactly universally seen as beautiful -- there's that gag where they say "Human women are so repulsive!"

I think that the overall effect intended, which I think may have been successful, was for the Duras sisters to be a kind of dream/nightmare in one for their male audience -- sexy body, scary faces, seductive but deadly, etc. A portrayal of extremely aggressive sexuality. "Arousing" in both the sexual sense and the fear/repulsion sense, which should make them magnetic. Overall I get the impression they're not as popular with the audience as they maybe were with the writers (Moore in particular). That's not *quite* the same as going for pure titillation, though I think that titillation is part of it. This seems to be the role they try to play for Worf in Part II, who of course is having none of it.
Set Bookmark
William B
Wed, Sep 4, 2019, 1:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Redemption, Part II

The two parallel discussions here are:

1. Were Lursa and B'Etor put in the Klingon Kleavage outfits in part to please a section of the audience with their hotness?
2. If so, is this a bad thing?

As to 1? I dunno. I think yes. I find the idea that Lursa and B'Etor are dressed in sexy attire in order to entrap Klingon men, but that none of the audience is supposed to find them at all sexy, a little strange. I think that it's meant to be that the Duras Sisters play their attractiveness to their advantage, which implies that they are meant to be attractive. So either they are meant to be unattractive by human standards but attractive by Klingon ones, or they are meant to be, well, attractive. The only way I'd buy that they are meant to be unattractive by human standards would seem plausible to me if the beauty standard was genuinely shown to be completely alien -- like with Ferengi objectifying women based on the quality of their fingers because of oo-max. That is something where it's so far from a human conception of sexy that the show is definitely demonstrating a sexual topic without expecting to arouse any sexual feelings in the audience. However, attractive women with hefty breasts partly exposed while in Klingon makeup? I don't think the Klingon makeup cancels their physical characteristics all that much in terms of intent.

It *may* be that they were going for a kind of body-horror-esque contrast between their hideous Klingon-makeup faces and their physical attributes. Sexy body scary face is its own thing. I can think of a lot of things they could have been going for.

HOWEVER, as for 2? I don't think it's a problem in this case. the idea that female politicians, particularly in a hereditary aristocracy, are using their sexuality to their advantage, does make sense and there is a story reason. I don't really object to it here, at all -- the Duras Sisters using their secondary sexual characteristics to seduce and intimidate? Why not? The story reason for Seven of Nine dressing like she does is so thin and so bonkers that it's pretty obvious there's no story reason for it at all. That's part of what Ron Moore's complaint was -- that if Seven was going to dress in an overtly sexual way, she should be interested in sex. He does have Lursa and B'Etor interested in sex, at least as a means for power, so, in this respect he's consistent. He takes the "sexy villainess" thing pretty far with Six in BSG, but there also is generally clear that he's not having her dressed seductively in a way that runs counter to the story.

The question of whether the story "needs" Lursa and B'Etor to be dressed this way is a little moot. I don't know that it adds that much to the story for L&B to use sexual seduction and intimidation as part of their arsenal, but I don't think it detracts either.
Set Bookmark
William B
Mon, Sep 2, 2019, 6:42am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: The Icarus Factor

Good thoughts all.

Chrome, I like your idea that Kyle cheated in his encounter with the Tholians. This makes me think of Kirk in his Kobayashi Maru, which then makes me consider whether Kyle could be something of a Kirk analogue. (Kirk also survived the Tholians.) Perhaps Riker wanted to be a Kirk-esque leader, but is that possible for him? Is it what he even wants?
Set Bookmark
William B
Wed, Aug 28, 2019, 11:50am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: First Contact

Just a bit more:

We know their society is in turmoil already, as Riker was injured in a riot.

The main thing Durken wants, all episode, is more time. Time to adjust to new *ideas*. Riker continually gets head injuries in the episode.

KROLA: Will he survive?
BEREL: I didn't think he would have survived the injuries.
KROLA: I have to interrogate him before he dies.
BEREL: At least give him time to regain some strength. Come back tomorrow.
KROLA: It cannot wait until tomorrow.
(Mirasta enters)
MIRASTA: Krola, we can get help from his ship. With their medical technology, he might recover.
KROLA: We're not giving him back. He's the one advantage we have now. Use your drugs to revive him.
BEREL: Those drugs increase cardial rate and vascular pressure. That's the last thing we need to do to him right now.
MIRASTA: It will probably be enough to kill him. You can't do it!

The point being: it takes time to recover from a head injury. Try to make someone recover from a head injury too fast, and they might die - - may be what is needed to fix their head will be too much for their heart to bear, for instance. The "head injury" for the planet is the relatively recent notion that they are not special, not the centre of the universe. The society can indeed adapt, given enough time. But they have not had time, yet.
Set Bookmark
William B
Wed, Aug 28, 2019, 11:41am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: First Contact

You know, while it may be that the episode fails to sell Krola's POV very well, I don't think it's because the writers were deliberately trying to make him entirely wrong. Maybe the glasses were not a great touch. But the episode goes out of its way to have Krola be the one to discover Riker and bring him to Durken's attention, to point out that Riker comes bearing a weapon, to expose that there has been secret surveillance, to point out that many conquerors believe themselves to be benevolent (and to acknowledge that Riker et al. may be telling the truth from their POV about what is happening). If we put it in left/right terms, Mirasta is indeed the forward thinking one, but she can barely hold her contempt for her whole planet in, whereas Krola is absolutely willing to self-sacrifice and martyr himself for the cause. Durken calls Krola "my friend" even as he reacts to Krola's foolishness. It seems to me the episode tries to keep saying that Krola is wrong about the Federation in his excess but has a point. Mirasta, meanwhile, is correct about the Federation but is so future directed she doesn't really sympathize with her own people. If I had to pick which of Mirasta or Krola cared more deeply about their people it would really be Krola, even though my values overall align more with Mirasta's.

I think the intent of the episode is further to use the hospital plot to comment on and reinforce the political side. Riker's presence in the hospital causes chaos and seems to be starting a panic. Some sympathize with him, some fear him, some want to bone him, but they don't yet have the cognitive framework as a society for how to deal with him, his presence being such a shock. Of course a society with no real conception of other life in the universe will be unprepared to deal with it; it is probably necessary to take time for a society to adapt to that planet not being the centre of the universe before actually accepting its smallness. In this manner, Krola is "right" that their society as is is unable to cope with the shock of entering into the stars. I don't think the intent is so much that regressive attitudes are holding them back, so much as it is necessary for a society to actually mature before entering a new stage, and the fear/paranoia is actually a reasonable circuit breaker to prevent change that is so rapid that social cohesion etc. can't handle it.

Maybe the episode failed at this but I genuinely believe Krola is meant to be misguided but well meaning, not just a prop to be knocked down or someone who ruins a perfectly good opportunity. Mirasta is also well-meaning, and "more correct" about the Federation, but misguided about her own people, refusing at first to acknowledge that not everyone shares her desire to move into the future and unknown. Where the episode falls down is in underlining exactly what.

As to what this episode is "about," I think it is mostly about 20th century Earth. Mirasta is the Star Trek fan who wants to bring the 24th century Utopia to Earth. (Bebe Neauwirth is the fangirl who writes erotic fanfic.) I think the episode uses the alien invasion/first contact story partly as backdrop to talk about what it means psychologically to approach an uncertain future. Of course there is much disagreement on the board about which aspects of the TNG-Era future would actually be good, but let's assume that most of us like at least *some* aspects of that future better than our own. But still, we can't rush into them too much, certainly not if a large number of people aren't on board.

This is maybe a circular argument about what Krola's position is: Krola is partly right because there are people like Krola in their society! But mostly I think it's arguing that it is a human trait (and yes the Malkorians are effectively human) to only be so adaptable to new changes, and that change has to happen gradually, and people have to be able to work with each other. Traditional values have to be incorporated into reforms. Arguably the episode is inattentive to how to do this, why this is important. However I'm convinced that Krola was correct in the narrow sense that contact with the Federation would have led to the destruction of their "way of life" via social disintegration, which might not be the case a generation or a few hence, and I think this is the intended takeaway. I honestly quite like the episode and think it "works" on an admittedly highly abstracted level, but it is apparent that it doesn't work on others.
Set Bookmark
William B
Wed, Aug 28, 2019, 10:25am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: The Measure of a Man

@Springy, isn't it great? I love the parallels you pointed out.

I think the Picard/Phillipa thread is interwoven nicely, and there's a sense that Picard's winning her over, and her being willing to be won over, heals their rift, just as it apparently heals the Data/Maddox one. No hard feelings: they recognize that, in the end, they all genuinely wanted to get at the truth, as blinded as some (esp Maddox) were to it.

I like how Riker's arguments were more physical and visceral, Picard's more intellectual and spiritual. Both because it suits the characters, and also because it fits what aspects of humanity Data has and lacks. Both Riker and Picard have to detach emotionally from Data (become more like Data) to do their part - - Riker to do the duty he hates, Picard to see past Data to the bigger picture. And both have to be less like Data in order to make their cases dramatically.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Aug 27, 2019, 3:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: First Contact

@Peter, good points.

I can't really get into it much more right now, at least without a rewatch. To be clear though, what I meant (clumsily communicated) with my last point is that IF the Federation is malevolent and will destroy their society, then I don't think it's stupid for Krola to resist, even if such resistance will be unsuccessful. That's the purpose of the Borg comparison: it is worth resisting even if it is to be unsuccessful.

You're probably correct that the episode doesn't sufficiently justify Krola's reasons for believing that the Federation is an existential threat. This seems to me to be somewhat self-evident (for reasons similar to what Jason lists), but yes his position is extreme. Mirasta's reasons for regarding the Federation with optimism also seem to me to be self-evident. But yes, the episode should be more careful to supply all the evidence.

I have some thoughts about how this episode deals with the Mirasta and Krola perspectives by developing it via the hospital plot, but they're not fully coherent so I'll sit on it for now.
Set Bookmark
William B
Mon, Aug 26, 2019, 8:41pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: First Contact

@Peter, you might be correct, but I feel that the writing on the Malkorians is a little more nuanced. For instance, here's what Krola actually says to Riker:

KROLA: Perhaps, like many conquerors, you believe your goals to be benevolent. I cannot. For however you would describe your intentions, you still represent the end to my way of life. I cannot permit that to occur. Eventually, Durken would choose to welcome your people with arms open and eyes closed. I must force him down another path.

So Krola is basically acknowledging that the Federation is possibly being "honest" in describing what they believe their intentions to be. But the bottom line is that benevolent hegemonies still tend to destroy and displace whoever they encounter, if Malkorian history is similar to human history up to our present.

The way I see Krola, he sees two possibilities (and I do think this could have been spelled out more, if I'm correct):

1. The Federation is actually malevolent, and so they might as well do everything they can to resist them. They will probably be destroyed, but it's preferable to go out fighting than meekly submit. Better to die in a blaze of glory than of a thousand cuts.
2. The Federation believes itself to be benevolent. So either his planet will be subsumed into the Federation, and thus destroyed, or they will remain apart from the Federation. In this scenario, the benevolent Federation will leave when told to do so, which they will do if they really believe themselves to be benevolent.

But even aside from these, Krola is sending a message to Durken. The Enterprise will do what it will. It's Durken who will control whether their society becomes a cargo cult/vassal state/whatever or resists being swallowed up. And I tend to think Krola is correct that the Federation might well overload their actual society, at this moment. Mirasta is actually a good argument for this: her allegiance immediately merges with the Federation. Presumably in some societies, the Mirasta and Krola wings are more able to communicate with each other, but here one gets the sense that whatever thread connects them would be broken in the transition to Federation membership.

Similarly I think Durken is reasonable in calling Mirasta out for not telling him about Riker. Her loyalty should be to their species if she's to remain a trusted advisor. Even if it's correct for Picard to have not told Durken about Riker, it shows a real lack of trust to tell Mirasta and not Durken about his presence. This is largely because of Mirasta, so I don't blame Picard much, but I believe it's a mistake.

In general, I would argue that Durken, Mirasta and Krola all act like the Federation is a force which they cannot really hope to control. The only question is how they respond. Either Picard is telling the truth or he isn't, but either way Mirasta wants to take the plunge and Krola wants to hang onto what they have. It's sort of like Picard's dealings with Q, in that he knows that he can be destroyed at any time, but still has to try to make decisions that are best for him and his crew.

Moreover, I'm not really sure how Krola's position is more stupid than the Federation's before the Borg or the Dominion, in terms of the futility of resistance. His belief is that he is facing an existential threat, even if the Federation is claiming to be benevolent, and so whether they win or lose is immaterial.
Set Bookmark
William B
Thu, Aug 15, 2019, 9:54am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Human Error

Also, I think the situation is different than if the roles are reversed, not because of gender but because Seven is basically an emotional child and Chakotay is both emotionally mature (well, is supposed to be) and her superior officer. What Seven is doing is inappropriate and the episode treats it as such but the emotional power imbalance is such that we don't really have to worry that Chakotay is being all that injured. Even if it were the less mature and confident Kim instead of Chakotay in Seven's fantasy it would play creepier, IMO.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Aug 13, 2019, 5:46pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Naked Now

Thank you, Strejda!
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Aug 13, 2019, 12:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

@Trent, Theo (et al.)

Interestingly my view of the episode aligns pretty strongly with Trent's -- and indeed I was going to post something similar but fuzzier, before I decided it'd been too long since I'd seen the episode, my view was too poorly-formed, I didn't want to stir things up again etc.

What I'd add to what Trent says is that I think that the episode's use of the Ferengi is actually pretty clever. I think that the Ferengi are used as representatives of clownish sexism, oppression -- human trafficking, even! -- in order to make it easy to recognize Picard as being far above them, *initially*, only to loop back around into criticizing Picard at the end. The Ferengi's total objectification of Kamala raises the question of whether her own civilization, and then eventually Picard, actually treats her better. And I think the answer is that, in some respects, they don't. Something similar goes with the scenes of the catcalling blue collar types (a classist stereotype but from my observation not one with no basis in reality), and even Riker and Worf. The types that Kamala inhabits with the Ferengi (where she's just a golden egg), the miners, Riker, Worf etc. are all easier to spot as fantasy fulfillment figures than the type she inhabits with Picard, which is far more complex but (arguably) not any more "free." I might even add Beverly's take on Kamala to the list -- she views Kamala as a perfect victim, who has no agency at all and cannot possibly enjoy the life set out for her, which requires Beverly to gloss over the apparent alien biology of the situation, and also seems to not involve Beverly actually talking to her.

I also think that the episode highlights a fracture in Picard's ethical framework. Picard both values commitment to duty, self-sacrifice and self-abnegation, the greater good, peace, AND to justice, individual rights, countering oppression, the importance of subjectively lived experience, etc. This is reasonable -- most of us probably value both. This is a situation in which the two conflict. Picard himself would, I have little doubt, lay down his life to end a horrific war (provided it was his place, and not a Prime Directive issue), and so he does actually walk the walk with the self-sacrifice thing, but he also is not being asked to enter into what is a sham, symbolic marriage for the rest of his life, to have to live a lie for decades until he dies. Perhaps as Skeptical indicates she will have lots of time to herself to explore other features of her life, but I don't know whether that will be the case. Anyway, I think the inability of Picard to resolve the contradictions of his value system ends up cornering Kamala into a, if not worst-case scenario, arguably a very tragic one. He (and who his image of the perfect mate/partner) ends up inadvertently requiring her that Kamala understand the value of the freedom she cannot attain and the sense of duty and self-sacrifice required to put aside what is best for her. Kamala's imprinting on him produces the effect that she understands on a deep level what she is giving up, because Picard could not truly bear *either* that she commit deep down to the role she has been set out nor to actual rebellion against her circumstances.
Set Bookmark
William B
Mon, Aug 12, 2019, 7:36pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Elementary, Dear Data

Interestingly, there's a bit in the shooting script which reveals that Data had figured out that Moriarty could leave the holodeck and had outsmarted him as a result. This was a good cut, because while it resolves Data's arc for the episode it just creates too many other problems, technically, thematically, and ethically.

Interestingly I think the sequel to this episode, Ship in a Bottle, genuinely does resolve the dangling Data thread, which is great.
Set Bookmark
William B
Fri, Aug 9, 2019, 12:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: The Child

And of course Riker's beard, Geordi's being in Engineering, Worf's security post being more official. It's pretty low-key. Most of what's good about this episode is really quite incidental to the main story (which is a hastily rewritten script from the, following Worf's suggestion, killed-in-infancy Star Trek II series).
Set Bookmark
William B
Fri, Aug 9, 2019, 12:11pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: The Child

This episode contains one of the strongest pieces of evidence for Wesley as Mary Sue, which is that upon getting *Whoopi Goldberg* to be on the show, the very first use they put her to is to convince Wesley to stay. I say that half-joking and half with affection.

In retrospect I feel a little better about this one than I did earlier on. I think that the material surrounding the transitions and introductions and (offscreen) departures (Beverly, Wesley, Pulaski, Guinan) is pretty good, and looking at the Ian Andrew material through the lens of the cast reshuffling makes the episode broadly about not just life but about the way people (especially children) enter and leave our lives.
Set Bookmark
William B
Wed, Aug 7, 2019, 11:40am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Samaritan Snare

@Peter, this is a very intriguing analysis (and one that almost makes me want to rewatch this episode -- which I maybe even will, despite its...problems). What is it that "makes us go" but our hearts, in their literal function of pumping blood in our bodies?

On the Beverly question, I think I disagree a bit that it's a problem in Tapestry. Picard and Beverly *are* different ages -- at the very least, the actors are nine years apart in age, which would be significant at the time Picard was a cadet. This difference could have been shortened in order to provide the story you suggest. But I'm not sure that it's necessary that it was literally Beverly that Picard was stabbed for. We could rather see Picard's losing his heart due to his hotheaded decisions in his youth, and having to make do with a mechanical replacement (which he keeps deeply under wraps, to the point he wants to leave the ship), as being a determining factor that caused him to refrain from expressing his feelings to Beverly later on.

What's interesting is this also suggests the ways in which he relates to Wesley: Picard might actually *want* to take a more active fatherly role in Wesley's life, both because he loves Beverly and because he was Jack's best friend, but he feels restricted to only providing career-mentorship, which is, in the end, not really what Wesley wants from him either. The main lesson that the Traveler seems to teach Wesley is that he should try to interact with the physical, mechanical world from an intuitive, even emotional place, and that's where Wesley's genius lies; it seems that in following Picard Wesley internalizes some of the necessity of cutting himself off from his emotions in order to prioritize his career, which seems to be some of what leads him astray (deriving meaning in his life from Nova Squadron, e.g.). At the very least, the moral self-discipline required to live Picard's life seems to be greater than what most people can manage (apparently including Wesley), which is maybe a sign that we should not seek to emulate this aspect of Picard (his emotional detachment) *too* closely, if we can avoid it (which Picard arguably cannot).
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Jul 23, 2019, 11:05am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Big Goodbye

Haha. Most of us probably all have soft spots for episodes we know aren't exactly the best.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Jul 23, 2019, 10:32am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Big Goodbye

(Of course, one could argue that a real Bogart fan would have made better episodes as homage!)

I should also say that because Picard is so enthusiastic, it should be a better detective/noir story than it is, so I take back that "part of the point" line. So okay it's not a good homage and it's anemic and all but I still find the effort kind of charming, and as I said I still really like Tierney here.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Jul 23, 2019, 10:26am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Big Goodbye

I kind of like this one, possibly because I am a fan of detective noir films. Of course this is plastic and inauthentic, but that's part of the point. It's definitely slow and kind of pointless, but I like Tierney a lot even in a kind of empty role like this one, and I like the Data, Crusher bits (as Springy mentions) and Picard's enthusiasm. Really this episode feels like a trial run for better episodes down the line (particularly the Moriarty eps). Picard navigating an "exciting" (or so is the intent) adventure as proxy for navigating the boring but higher stakes language diplomacy thing is also about how fiction functions in our lives (see also that Picard and Crusher can only flirt in character), and to an extent this first holodeck malfunction is about becoming too involved in a story.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Jul 23, 2019, 10:19am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Big Goodbye

I think it's the latter (that this is a deliberate homage to film noir in general). There was certainly no attempt to hide that this is based on The Maltese Falcon, with Sydney Greenstreet's character being renamed "Cyrus Redblock." Humphrey Bogart starred in both The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep, and We'll Always Have Paris, later in the season, references Casablanca, so there seems to be a Bogart fan on the staff. Lawrence Tierney, who plays Redblock, was a heavy in many old noirs as well (Tarantino would use him in Reservoir Dogs a few years later).

In any case, the titles of both of the Marlowe novels are euphemisms to death - - the big sleep, the long goodbye. The episode gives some poignancy to Hill's friend who asks whether he'll still exist when Picard turns off the program, and so I think what this episode is "about" is about death and stories - - how we are attracted to stories where people encounter death but have mastery over it (detectives). Whether those stories stay with us when we leave them. I'm not saying it's successful at that.
Set Bookmark
William B
Fri, Jul 19, 2019, 11:20am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Things Past

I'm pretty sure Dax just picked Leeta as the name as a Bajoran she knows. She was taken by Dukat's goons before the others found out their names, which required Garak swiping access to the computer system, and so she had no way to know who she was supposed to be. Probably Dukat doesn't particularly care what his, uh, "companions" call themselves, even if her identity can be verified.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Jul 16, 2019, 11:09am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Hide and Q

@Chrome,

I agree that this episode works pretty well if we assume Q's real target is still Picard, and it's not a stretch at all. OTOH,

(spoilers)

The case can be made that it's very important for the human race (!!!) for Riker to get a taste of real power and to give it up, and for him to recognize that he cannot just become Picard to replace him. Arguably both are necessary for Riker to save the day in BOBW, by recognizing how to see the value in recovering Picard and how to improvise around a more powerful opponent rather than simply being him. If we view Q as at least partly enacting a plan to help humanity then he maybe is intervening to get the very result this episode gives. Death Wish also suggests that the Q recognize Riker's importance. This is hardly the episode's intent but it makes some sense anyhow.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Jul 16, 2019, 10:09am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Hide and Q

@Springy,

The penalty box scene is so cringey. I get why Crosby wasn't happy with her role on the show.

It's probably not intended, but I like that Troi is absent for this episode "about" Riker's runaway ambition.

I think I mentioned it above, but one thing I like is how this episode shows the "way out" of the dilemma in Where No Man Has Gone Before (where Mitchell got Godlike powers and had to be killed): Riker can choose to put them aside and doesn't have to be killed. There are a few TNG eps that imagine more peaceful resolutions to TOS plots. In some cases (eg this one) it makes for worse drama.
Set Bookmark
William B
Tue, Jul 16, 2019, 10:03am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Battle

@Springy,

I think I recall you making a similar observation in Buffy, about Willow and Tara stargazing and Willow mentioning that some of the stars have since died.

I should add, this is also the first ep that suggests the possibility that a) the Ferengi are motivated by more than greed, and also b) "profit" (self-interest) is not entirely bad (Kazenga recognizing there's no profit in revenge), which are regular themes in the Quark eps.
Next ►Page 1 of 75
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2019 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.