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Laroquod
Sun, Jun 24, 2012, 7:56am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: The Dogs of War

I'm 100% behind all of the things Eliott has said above. Well done, Eliott, you did a bang-up job with this one.

Regarding this episode, Ezri and Julian's endless pussyfooting is ridiculous and not funny. Despite being described by Worf as an overgrown child, I haven't been buying that description of his character since season 2 and he is definitely too old for this. With Ezri it's even less believable because she has something like 300-odd years of memories of courting rituals.

As for Quark, his story made even less sense. Didn't the Quark already get appointed Grand Nagus by Zek, like wasn't that one of the first if not the very first did thing Zek did to him back when they first met? And it all turned out to be a big ruse to trap Quark, right? So why would he just blindly believe Zek, this time? He just walks right into it -- even to the point of selling his bar. This is not the same character as the Quark from season 1. This Quark is not even from the same universe as season 1.

Come to think of it, none of the Starfleet people are from the same universe either, nor is the Federation itself. Did we get permanently stuck in DS9's ridiculous mirror universe? Or did the DS9 writers get so infected with not caring (by not caring about the mirror universe characters) that they started to not care about the main universe characters, too? I mean why not, right? Apparently DS9 fans just eat that stuff up, regardless.
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Laroquod
Sun, Jun 24, 2012, 5:10am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Penumbra

P.S. The Vulcans don't actually care about baseball, that's not what the episode said. What the episode said was that the Vulcan captain only forced his crew to learn baseball in order to get Sisko's goat. Mind you, it makes little sense for a Vulcan to go to such lengths in service of nothing other than an emotional ploy. Vulcans and the writers of DS9 just don't mix because in order to do Vulcans right you have to take Star Trek seriously.
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Laroquod
Sun, Jun 24, 2012, 5:06am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: Penumbra

Ezri isn't great, but she's no worse than Jadzia, really. They are approximately equivalent in acting ability and in what they contribute to the overall storylines (i.e. very little of worth). I don't find either of them annoying, however. How anyone could single out *Ezri* as annoying on a show that regularly features Rom, Moogie, and Zek, is beyond me. She's basically one of the least annoying things on a show of many annoying things.

BTW it makes perfect sense for Ezri to be very relaxed about so-called Trill 'taboos' because she received no training prior to being joined.
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Laroquod
Sat, Jun 23, 2012, 3:36pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Dark Frontier

@Jay

Janeway made the same decision in both the case of the Cardassian doctor hologram and in the case of stealing Borg technology.
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Laroquod
Thu, Jun 21, 2012, 7:13pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: In the Pale Moonlight

I wish that the destruction of the Federation as a positive vision of the future were the only problem I had with this episode, because then I would at least be able to respect it as an alternative vision, however inappropriate for Star Trek. But Avery Brooks's overacting stinks so hard in the long soliloquys (which the writers used to paper over and conveniently skip all of the toughest conversations), that it's really impossible to take this episode seriously enough to take offence. False dilemma. Bunch of self-justifying mumbo jumbo instead of showing a clear and complete record of what transpired. Not admirable even as a criticism of utopianism, and quite tediously overwrought in any case.
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Laroquod
Thu, Jun 21, 2012, 1:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Change of Heart

Terrible episode with many groanworthy moments between Worf and Dax involving cheesy jokes made even duller by the general lacklustre delivery and lack of chemistry between them.
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Laroquod
Thu, Jun 21, 2012, 12:12pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Honor Among Thieves

It was a solid hour of television that had nothing whatsoever to do with science fiction, so that makes it a mediocre hour of science fiction television.
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Laroquod
Thu, Jun 21, 2012, 10:22am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: One Little Ship

People who are angry at reviewers for being biased against Ferengi are hilarious. I can live with that kind of bias; it's like being biased against bad jokes and slapstick comedy. It's the kind of discrimination otherwise known as 'having good taste'.
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Laroquod
Wed, Jun 20, 2012, 9:46pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Statistical Probabilities

Bashir was specifically named the station's intelligence officer, so it makes sense that he would have access to information nobody else on the station does except perhaps Sisko. What doesn't make sense is why he would still be trusted with any intelligence after handing it over to the certifiably insane.

Otherwise, I'm with Neil, above. It is nonsensical for anyone to take these yokels' analysis seriously in a world in which, three episodes previously, the gods erased an entirely enemy fleet. Logic dictates delaying any surrender until the last possible moment to maximise the opportunity for the gods to step in again and tip the scales.

Mind you, it's not this episode that's at fault. It's the silly wormhole aliens in the first place. We know that Q isn't going to change the course of some munane war, because that isn't the sort of thing Q does. Q just changes whatever's necessary to flabbergast and annoy some human plaything, and then changes most of it back again. But the wormhole aliens now have a track record of just wiping Sisko's enemies out of existence on an inexplicable whim. Now that they have done that pretty much all sense of real danger has drained from the series and it is impossible to take episodes like this seriously anymore.
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Laroquod
Sun, Jun 17, 2012, 5:00pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S4: Scorpion, Part II

Picard also broke the Prime Directive when it suited him, and Kirk was famous for it. The Prime Directive is really made to be broken; the whole message of Star Trek is that you should have a rule like the Prime Directive but that you should probably be willing to break it or at least bend it real hard when it's for humanitarian reasons (or at least turn a blind eye to those who do).

For some reason, however, fans seem to only have a problem with the inconsistent application of the Prime Directive when it is being applied by Captain Janeway. Gee, I wonder why. Couldn't be that they have a chip on their shoulder regarding Voyager and therefore all the things that Star Trek normally does (break the PD, engage in technobabble) are suddenly capital offences when they are done by the crew of Voyager.

Wake up and smell the hypocrisy. Star Trek is all about technobabble and about seeking out ethical situations in which the crew will be forced to selectively break its own rules: it always has been about these things in every single series; Voyager is no exception. To all those who say Voyager sucks because of reset buttons and technobabble and bad use of PD, I guarantee you that I can find dozens of examples of those exact things in your favourite Star Trek series. End of line.
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Laroquod
Sun, Jun 17, 2012, 4:48pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Scorpion, Part I

@Justin That's ridiculous; your two examples of dialogue are almost identical. If you're that allergic to fake science that you would rather hear nothing at all rather than a few fake science terms allowing a crew member to be patted on the back for their technical knowledge, then why bother watching science fiction? Just watch Westerns.

I swear, the backlash against 'technobabble' has gotten way out of control. These are scientists; they should be talking science type stuff that we don't understand. The fact that we can't understand it makes it more realistic, not less. Technobabble is only bad when it gets to be too much and replaces all other methods of solving the plot, but in moderate amounts it makes the 24th Century seem more authentic and certainly as your comparative examples demonstrate it did not interfere with any enjoyment in this case as it was barely a hiccup in a standard scene.
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Laroquod
Wed, Jun 13, 2012, 8:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Basics, Part I

If it helps, think of Chakotay as kind of like Worf -- after all, he makes his decisions by taking electronic peyote and consulting with spirits. If he says he's gotta go back for the kid, then Janeway says they go back for the kid. Just like Picard would often respect Worf's twisted Klingon insanity. Qapla, Chakotay!
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Laroquod
Tue, Jun 12, 2012, 7:44am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Sword of Kahless

I agree with the Jacobian. This episode seems intent on destroying all of the goodwill previously built up toward Worf. According to Memory Alpha, the fans wanted to believe that the sword had some magical evil influence so they wouldn't have to believe that Worf could be such a coward as to try to trick Kor into falling to his death, and the writer and producer of this episode felt they had failed in their mission to get the fans to accept that Worf really is that much of a politically ambitious craven schemer in his heart. This is 180 degrees reversed from what the character has always been. The fact that they were surprised and disappointed that the fans couldn't accept this turn shows that they completely failed to understand this character they had borrowed. I feel that this treatment Worf sealed the show's fate, ratings-wise, but that is just a theory based on my personal feelings (but I believe they are widely shared among Star Trek fans of that era -- Worf does not underhandedly try to assassinate anyone for personal gain: PERIOD).
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Laroquod
Sun, Jun 10, 2012, 2:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: Learning Curve

"It just feels too much like the writers sat down one day and said "TNG had poker, DS9 has darts... Let's do pool!". In fact, I'm pretty sure that's exactly what happened."

You've got that partially backwards. This episode wasn't the first appearance on VOY of the pool table and DS9 didn't do darts until season 3 -- so actually the pool-playing appeared on VOY before they ever played darts on DS9. In fact I read a production note at Memory Alpha for the first dart episode that said they purposely avoided pool because it had already been done on Voyager, so for better or worse the thought process you ascribe to the Voyager pool thing is actually a better description of the thought process that led to the DS9 dart thing.
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Laroquod
Sun, Jun 10, 2012, 7:21am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: The Die Is Cast

I have the opposite. The stuff on the Defiant was all fine. I think Odo and Garak *did* bring back some key information about the Founders' tactics that the Federation wouldn't have had otherwise.

The problem I have is the interrogation scenes between Odo and Garak. They are good scenes, but there is simply no reason for them to exist. Ostensibly, Garak had to break Odo to prove his innocence, but when he does, he keeps what he has found out to himself (which is really nothing special -- anyone could have guessed that Odo feels homesick regardless of his political views because this is the way any humanoid would likely feel). Why keep that information to himself and pretend the torture didn't work, when the reason for the torture was to protect his position with Tain?

Garak's motivations simply don't make any sense here, it makes the interrogation scene play like an elaborate, extended excuse for Odo to reveal his homesickness to the audience because it was completely irrelevant to anything else in the episode. So that whole thing was for the benefit of sentimentality and that's a really weak reason for including something in a script -- the writing came off a straining forcefully to hit an emotional note for Odo that wasn't really justified by the story.

For that reason I have to rate this episode as good (the scenes were after all well played) but not great, and the fault lies squarely with the writing.
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