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K9T
Tue, Apr 4, 2017, 1:44am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Wars: The Phantom Menace

>So going back to the OT as someone who didnt see them originally when they come out, nor had them spoiled, they are far better movies, but to be honest I found them glorified fairytales & that were alright, I could never understand the hype.

Actually, you just stated why people loved them yourself. They were fairy tales. They were classic adventures with focused stories which knew what they were and what they wanted to be. It was the classic "Hero's Journey" and hit all the key points for a good story. They weren't political dialogue, or flashy special effects monstrosities, or some deep summation of the state of humanity. Their simplicity WAS their strength.

You saw them after you had your expectations set by a) decades of hype and b) watching the godawful prequels. If you watched the originals with no expectations other than as three entertaining movies, you would have found a great fantasy adventure with colorful characters, and a moving storyline. Nothing more, nothing less. But that's exactly what made them such great movies to the rest of us.
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K9T
Tue, Apr 4, 2017, 1:37am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Wars: The Phantom Menace

And I have to 100% agree with Cashback's statement about kendo as a basis for star wars. The "ancient" art of the Samurai (as in about 300 years old) really is about making focused, determined attacks, not flinging your weapon around willy-nilly (which would get you killed in two seconds against a real swordsman).

High-skill swordsmanship, especially dueling, is NEVER about acrobatics and physical feats of strength or agility. In fact, in Japan, the best kendo masters (7, 8, and 9-dan) are usually pushing 70 years old. And young, upcoming hotshots, no matter how acrobatic, dexterous, or physical gifted, routinely get their asses handed to them on a platter by someone three times their age. Why? Because it's not about physical stamina, acrobatics, flexibility, etc. It's ALL MENTAL. And about wisdom born of experience and countless hours of practice. The only physical part of kendo (and by extension samurai combat, and the basis for all lightsaber duels in the original trilogy) is about body control, and keeping yourself still and steady while you search for your opponent's weakness. And then having the control to put one focused burst for a determined, purposeful strike (and follow-through) without your opponent being able to sense the attack's vector. This is why in kendo you must a) call out your target, b) make a determined "kiai" (shout), and c) display complete control on the follow through, such that you can show you are able to receive a follow up attack, or strike again. And even in Western fencing, you can only score a point when you have the advantage and are pushing through with a determined attack, not just blindly whipping the foil about in defense.

Completely the opposite of the blinding, stupid, mindless, eye-candy the idiotic fanboys drool over with spinning lights and shiny distractions (seriously, they are like goddamn infants). And giving Yoda a lightsaber was the cherry on this cake of fail. Why the F*** would Yoda, a master of the Force, need a lightsaber? Yoda is not a warrior, for crying out loud. His strength is in his wisdom, foresight, and cleverness, not whipping around like a turd flung from a hippo's ass at targets three times his size.

The prequels are all garbage because they completely show a fundamental misunderstanding of storytelling, character building, and finding a deeper meaning behind flashy visuals and fake-as-sh*t special effects. And it's obvious from the start that Lucas has absolutely no idea what his own story is truly about, or why the original trilogy was so beloved.
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K9T
Tue, Apr 4, 2017, 1:19am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Wars: The Phantom Menace

Another thing that always gets me with these crappy prequels is the goddamned prophecy. Who the hell writes these things? Why the hell do writers consistently resort to these things as plot devices (*coughLAZINESScough*)? Prophecies are the laziest form of foreshadowing and exposition possible, and are downright insulting. Why must every hero be "prophecised" to beat the bad guy? Why are prophecies never wrong? Why are they always perfect? And who the hell writes these prophecies, because it seems like THEY are the true heroes of the story. Harry Potter also resorts to this crap, but at least JKR had the excuse of being an amateur, first-time writer.

The Jesus allegory was also nose-burningly awful. WTF Lucas? The original trilogy had none of this crap, so why muddy the waters with useless, lazy religious symbolism garbage (which only serves to create plot-holes and contradictions). Although I say "lazy", it actually took effort to screw things up this badly, so maybe I should at least give some credit for Lucas's hard work.
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K9T
Fri, Mar 31, 2017, 1:53am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

Definitely my favorite episode of DS9, and most of Trek in general. Loved it.

@Luke

>Sisko is the one sent back in time, and while he has memories of the old timeline, they're meaningless.

Meaningless? That he found out so much about his son, the kind of person he is and will likely become? The dreams he clearly has in him in his youth? Meaningless? Well, that seems to me to be a bit more problem with the interpretation than the source material; after all who are any of us (other than the original writer) to decide what is "meaningless" for another, even for a fictional story character?

>All that plus, it seems like the Galaxy fared way better with Sisko dead, all things considered. Not an implication I'm particularly fond of.

Meh. You can't say or know that. It's so completely chaotic and quantum that who knows how the next 100 years would have turned out, or the hundred after that. This is WMG and epileptic trees without even the thinnest of bases to jump off of.
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K9T
Wed, Mar 29, 2017, 12:30am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Miri

I would venture to guess those complaining about the Miri-crush on Kirk as "disturbing" or "creepy" are a) men (who have no idea what this feeling is, because they conveniently forget when they had this exact same thing when they were young teens with a very good-looking adult woman in their life) and/or b) have never worked with kids of that age before (as a teacher, etc.), because a young girl getting a puppy-love crush on an older man, especially one she looks up to, is entirely believable, real, and occurs every day with human beings. The "disturbing" or "creepy" part would be if the man used that crush to take advantage (romantically, of course, or even with just plain power-abuse, like using her infatuation to con her out of money, etc.), which Kirk patently does NOT do in this episode.

So, I guess, I'd just say to all the witch-hunters: pack your torches and pitchforks and go home, because every interaction between an adult male and a female child is NOT the sick and perverted fantasy created by your own minds that you think it to be.
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K9T
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 3:49am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek III: The Search For Spock

>More importantly, if McCoy had a copy of Spock's mind up to the point when he entered the energizer chamber, why was revived Spock's first memory a dialogue he had with Kirk *after* uploading his katra? I hope somebody was fired for that blunder.

Really? I thought his first line was "The ship? Out of danger?" clearly shows he doesn't remember the dialogue with Kirk in the Antimatter Remix Chamber, else he would have known the outcome of that dialogue (in which he found that he saved the ship).

He replayed the dialogue to Kirk on Vulcan because that was what was currently on his mind when he gave his katra to McCoy. He repeated the very next words when he was restored that he said after he melded with McCoy, as not only artistic repitition, done very well as a parallel between the two movies' ending scenes, but also made sense in that Spock's katra would just start off from where he had left off, and replay those moments (and words) once he was restored.

Someone should have won an AWARD for that decision.
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K9T
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 3:27am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Given Shatner's pechance for overacting and strange speech patterns, Spock's death and the funeral was nothing short of a masterpiece of subdued emotion, subtlety, and low-key grief, perfect for this storied relationship.

Where many movies would give the big "NOOOOooooo! SPPPpooooockkk!" at the death scene, this gives us a quiet "no..." as if all energy had been drained from Shatner's body (as indeed it would for us if we watched our best friend die).

Where many stories would give this flowery, hammy speech with sobbing, crying, huge proclamations, this gives us one of the most stoic Shatner's quietly stating "Of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most... human." And the quivering of the voice leading up to the one crack just focused all of the sadness and grief that the character of Kirk must have been holding in, into that one small moment of vulnerability, where he shows his crew just how hard this hit him, how that invincible mask dropped for just a moment. And the way Shatner follows through with this scene sells the emotional moment so subtly, yet so powerfully, I think it is one of the best moments in all the Star Trek franchise.
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K9T
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 1:14am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Masks

No real understanding that this is an allegorical mythology of the sun and the moon, night and day? Wow, I guess I liked this episode because it gave some intellectual meat, rather than being just technobabble sci-fi action (which we see in almost every other non-Sub Rosa episode), but I guess the reviewer couldn't keep up intellectually with the ideas presented in this episode (which are very much like a condensed and "layman's version" of the myths of many non-Western ancient cultures), and as such, discards them all as "a mess."
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K9T
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 12:58am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Homeward

>The Boraalans were selected by nature for extinction.

This is such a false premise that shows up constantly, it's frustrating to the point of tears. Nature is not a force with intelligence. It doesn't "choose". It doesn't "select." Under terms of natural selection, what is happening is that some mutation creates a numeric advantage (in terms of number of offspring that survive to reproducing age), so that one population can gain that advantage and win out numerically.

That's it.

Nature did not "select" these people. They were just in the wrong place at the wrong time, much like Data's friend in Pen Pals. There is nothing inherently wrong about either species that suggests they "deserve to die", as a qualification about "nature selecting them" would entail. So, there is no reason to allow that to happen, as if they are destroyed, there is no longer any civilization to protect and nurture with non-interference (thus defeating the whole point of "helping' a civilization by staying neutral, because that neutrality destroyed the civilization completely; which the academics among us would note is the opposite of "nurture").

The PD is basically saying if there is some social evolution (note, NOT natural phenomenon) that is leading to change in a society, don't interfere with that change, and let the species resolve it as they would without outside interference. It says (or shouldn't say) nothing about helping a species doomed to die because of natural phenomenon out of their hands.
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K9T
Fri, Mar 17, 2017, 12:31am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: A Matter of Perspective

To the original poster on this thread: "In "A Matter Of Perspective", it is never explained how both Riker's and Apgar's wife's stories can be true, which they obviously cannot be."

You really must go watch Rashomon to understand this. And, even though in objective reality, they of course cannot both be true, the entire point of Rashomon (and this episode) is that our perceptions of reality can see it as true (without guile, lie, or deceit) even when faced with a contradictory point of view (which is also seen as truth by the holder of this contradictory viewpoint).

Sadly, the skill and empathy to understand that this is the case is missing in the current era of "If you aren't my ally you are my mortal enemy" politics that plagues the world these days.
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 10:40pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: The High Ground

"All America is their homeland. " To say this with a straight face referring to slaves forcibly relocated from various locations in Africa (and then at that point only between a couple centuries and a couple years before the time period you are addressing!) really damages any other point you think you may have been making. Though, to be honest, your clearly anti-Arab and anti-Muslim bias really detracts from any credibility you might have when trying to speak objectively about history, anyway.

If you want to be taken seriously as a credible source on history, drop the biased language and opinionated editorials, and try to think of a situation from the minds and eyes of the people you are speaking of, rather than casting them into a mold created by a Euro-American-centric bias.
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 10:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: The Emissary

One of the poster's before asked: "In the Emissary the probe has been in space. Touching it with your bare hands is not advisable! Would have thought it was a bit cold?"

Actually, no. Space is technically "cold" in that it doesn't have molecules to pass on heat, although there is still radiation that keeps empty space around 3 degrees Kelvin. However, objects in space, in fact present the opposite problem. Since space is a near-perfect vacuum, it cannot conduct heat, therefore space is a perfect INSULATOR, meaning it's almost impossible to let off heat. Only through radiation is it possible (aside from gathering the heat into special repositories through conduction/convection and jettisoning them into space) to release heat energy.

So, the probe would be more likely to be scalding than cold, because it would be quickly radiating and conducting all of its remaining excess heat now that it is in an atmosphere and able to do so (it would be assumed that the probe was continuously radiating heat during its journey, or its occupant would have been boiled inside).
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 9:56pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: The Bonding

From the first poster: "One point brought up by the episode though - why are children left alone in their quarters? Shouldn't they always be with an adult?"

Do parents always leave children with an adult now? Especially 12 year olds? This always puzzled me about modern America, where we seem to want to wrap our children in blankets and sit guard on them for 18 years, rather than teach them how to live in the world, be free to make their own mistakes, and learn how to cope with mistakes (in addition to respecting them as increasingly capable individuals). And then Americans wonder why an entire generation of youth is weak-minded, weak-willed, and unable to cope with adversity.

And America is supposed to be such an individualistic country, whereas other communal cultures are just fine letting their kids take the bus/train to school by themselves as early as 5 or 6 years old!
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 4:03am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Drumhead

>(You can insert your own current-day political commentary here.)

And boy, can you. Amazing how that's one thing that will never become dated...
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 3:40am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Darmok

The past few posters are of course, thinking in a very cultural/language-centric manner, believing that every language and culture must, by definition, must by similar to or be compared to your own.

Even on earth, we have many cultures and languages that are not strictly defined by its grammar, yet are surprisingly rich enough to get across information. The most amusing part of your argument is that English itself is HEAVILY based on idiom and metaphor, enough so that it's why non-native speakers have the hardest time figuring English out.

Now, abstract that out to different species on different planets, who might have figured out how to talk in all idioms or with metaphor, such that they become commonplace and as defined as any grammar we could come up with.

The last poster's little scene (inadvertently, I am certain) reminds me of blackface cartoons they would make in the 40-50's to make fun of other non-American/European cultures (where two people speaking in a Polynesian, African, Native American, Chinese, etc. tongue and are comically unable to understand one another despite being from the same culture and speaking the same non-English language), and it really starts to carry a certain weighty conceit to say that Western languages are the sole epitome of effective communication, or that other languages (even imaginary ones from other planets!) must evolve in similar patterns.
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 3:26am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Disaster

@Kned

Wow, someone pissed in your Wheaties this morning. From your apparent disposition in your post, I guess it had to be some children and a pregnant lady... :)
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 3:07am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: The Outrageous Okona

This episode is by definition (due to its title), and by far the best example of "Informed Attributes" (where a writer constantly TELLS the reader what a character is supposed to be like, rather than SHOWING them, and often the showing part shows the opposite of the telling part) that I think has ever existed.

Well, that's partially true. There is an "Okona" in this episode, but "Outrageous?" And Troi's shameless Informed Attributes attribution of being brazen, a lady's man, adventurous, etc. is so laughable as to almost be the best comedy (definitely more than Joe Piscopo) we'll see in this hour.
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 2:59am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Time's Arrow, Part I

>I'm not a literary historian and have no idea if Twain was this much of a showboat and an eccentric

He was. Every bit of those words that you can think of, he was.
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 2:55am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Imaginary Friend

This likely fell victim to the Hollywood Adult Writers Trying To Write Kids Syndrome. It's basically a trope at this point that kids in Hollywood-produced movies and shows are either written as way too precocious and smart, or way too stupid and infantile. And adults' handling of the children is equally vapid. Usually they refuse to believe anything a child says, no matter how proven it might be, or they believe EVERYTHING a child says because they are supposedly so honest (something anyone who has a child or who works with children can instantly tell you is BS; pure, sure, but not anywhere near honest).

Very few places do we see a child-like child with intelligence and imagination, but still a simple understanding of their world being treated with respect and attention, but always with a grain of salt that maybe their perception of a situation might not be 100% accurate/honest.

Come to think of it, looking at the current state of affairs with how people in the US treat children (as precious widdle snowflakes who will just die if they have to walk to school by themselves, even in a nice, low-crime neighborhoods, and who can't ever be trusted to take some self-initiative, and when anyone even talks to them, those "stranger dangers" should be strung up at the gallows for being an evil predator for daring to be in the same general area as a child), maybe Americans have been watching too much Hollywood writing after all...
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 2:40am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Nth Degree

Gawds, leave it to a nutbar to come in and spew political tripe without even tying it to the subject at hand. And this group of nuts wonder why most educated people in the world find them vapid, vile, and devoid of basic intelligence...
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K9T
Thu, Mar 16, 2017, 2:35am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Devil's Due

@Chrome

>What's funny, and perhaps scary is that, even in our time, people are still very susceptible to parlor tricks and carnival sideshows like Ardra. One need not look further back than our previous election cycle's Fake News for proof of that.

Or that a con-man/woman could take over the reigns of an entire nation/world just using (easily detected for a sufficiently aware/intelligent person) chicanery and transparently obvious fear-manipulation just by following the ole' PT Barnum's advice (said in this episode and very applicable to modern state of world affairs as well) to get what s/he wants.
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