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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sun, Mar 18, 2018, 7:16pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Force of Nature

I think I have an explanation for what happened after actually paying attention to this episode (one of the "benefits" of being sick on the couch). Part of it is corroborated by "Formerly known as Artisan's" comment from five years ago, as well as some of the production commentary on Memory Alpha. Namely, the story originally had a different message. It's like they had the script dealing with a local phenomenon but a hastily done staff rewrite tried to shoehorn in the larger global warming allegory without sufficiently modifying the dialogue.

I mentioned in my comment from 2012 that I didn't see any indication of this warp drive damage applying anywhere but in this particular isolated corridor of space. After watching closely, I can still say that's the case, at least as far as what's spoken in the dialogue. The exception is how everyone reacts, specifically Geordi. It's as if his dialogue was rewritten to make the problem bigger than actually presented. The same goes for the final scene. It fits the localized nature of the problem when Picard reads Starfleet's directive "...areas of space found susceptible to warp fields will be restricted to essential travel only." However the next line "Effective immediately, all Federation vessels will be limited to a speed of warp five, except in cases of extreme emergency" comes out of nowhere, since as I've said only the Hekaras Corridor has been identified as a place that's "susceptible to warp fields."

The one and only possible counter to this is a scene with Geordi, Data, and Rabal in Stellar Cartography. They're looking at the rift trying to find a way to get to the Fleming. At the end of the scene they notice something. "It's a subspace instability outside the rift. That should not be possible." Could this be nugget of information that's supposed to indicate damage to all of space? If so, the dialogue is wrong. It should be "It's a subspace instability outside the CORRIDOR," which is what the graphic indicates. Even so, just like Spot, the Ferengi, and Geordi's tinkering with the engines, it's never followed up on and forgotten despite being what could be the critical element of the story.

Also, coasting at warp? Come on. They also said after the Fleming engaged their warp engines that they no longer have sufficient velocity to escape. Just a short while before however they said "It would take weeks to reach them at impulse." Ok that would suck, but it's not like they'd be trapped. This is just so sloppy.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sun, Feb 25, 2018, 3:48pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

I never noticed this before, but Picard didn't reveal to Wesley that he in fact had evidence of their attempt at the Kolvoord Starburst. In his panicked conversation with Locarno, Wesley even says there's no evidence. So had Wesley not confessed, Picard would have shown that the Saturn NavCon image matches the animation of the maneuver (which wouldn't necessarily stand on its own merits), but they also know from the flight data recorder that Wesley opened his ship's coolant interlock, which is necessary to "ignite the plasma." Just imagine how that scene would have played out!
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Wed, Feb 21, 2018, 8:10pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Hero Worship

I never really liked this episode, but I don't hate it either. Airing it right after New Ground definitely drags it down.

Regarding the school, the model building scene, and the way Timothy is behaving, it seems to me he was supposed to be younger, but they probably couldn't find an actor who could handle the part. With such an aggressive production schedule they wouldn't have had the time to redo the writing, sets, or much else. The other kids in the school look at least a couple years younger, but we don't see a lot of them so it's hard to tell.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Tue, Feb 20, 2018, 9:19pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

I agree there's a lot of flaws in the episode, but I still enjoy it. Nevertheless, I do think it was incredibly irresponsible of the crew to just let the time ship go back to Jersey all by itself. Data knew it was about to leave and could have stayed with it to figure out how to use it and bring it back. As it is, I picture it reappearing in Rasmussen's garage and quickly becoming a curiosity that gets snatched by the authorities. In 200 years someone could've figured out how to get into the thing. Aside from that, wouldn't someone like Captain Braxton from Voyager come looking for it after its first captain failed to return? Maybe they were a bit more relaxed about their time travel in the 26th century.
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Jeffrey G Key
Sun, Feb 4, 2018, 6:21pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: The Dogs of War

Have to say Quark would be wearing a red "Make Ferenginar Great Again" cap in 2018.

Otherwise, great episode.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Mon, Jan 29, 2018, 7:13pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Contagion

When Geordi is shocked by the control panel in engineering, and Data throws him back with enough force for Geordi to crumple to the ground, you see a noticeable "oh crap" expression on Data's face. I have to wonder if that was scripted/directed or if it was actually Brent Spiner reacting to LeVar Burton's "flight."
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Jeffrey Combs
Thu, Jan 4, 2018, 6:15am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Battle Lines

@Drewmina - We don't talk about Babylon 5 here. Jammer doesn't like it. Too much competition for DS9, I guess.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sat, May 20, 2017, 4:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: The Alternate

That planet was one of the most fakey sound stages with matte painting backdrops I've seen since first season TNG.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Tue, May 9, 2017, 7:30pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Dramatis Personae

This episode was quite middling, and would've been greatly helped by a strong musical score (think TNG's Booby Trap or Night Terrors). Sadly, we get the usual bland brass wallpaper music, which just highlights the banality of the episode. Thanks a lot Rick Berman >_<
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sat, Dec 10, 2016, 1:40pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: 11:59

I don't dislike this episode, and I applaud them for trying something different. I also don't agree that it's just filler because it isn't sci-fi. TNG's "Family" is similar, and it's an outstanding character piece. DS9's "Past Tense" is also a very similar story, and an important one.

That said, speaking of "Past Tense" there is a similar kind of artificiality I feel in both of these episodes. Maybe it's the studio backlot setting which is almost real but not quite, or the strangely quiet and somewhat stilted acting which might be a symptom of being outside the actors' comfort zones, but both these episodes have something of a Truman Show feel to them that doesn't sit quite right with me.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sat, Dec 3, 2016, 6:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Thirty Days

Thank you Mikey for bringing up the hull breach issue. It's not even that the stream of water would slice Tom in half, but the tiniest breach would instantly crush everyone inside to pink goo. Futurama made this same mistake (though probably deliberately) after conceding that a spaceship's design considerations are completely opposite that of a submarine.

LEELA: Depth at 45 hundred feet, 48 hundred, 50 hundred! 5000 feet!
FARNSWORTH: Dear Lord, that's over 150 atmospheres of pressure.
FRY: How many atmospheres can this ship withstand?
FARNSWORTH: Well it's a spaceship, so I'd say anywhere between zero and one.

Assuming the gravitational field holding this planet together is similar to the gravity we experience on Earth, at 600km in depth, they'd be subjected to nearly 60,000 atmospheres of pressure, or 875,000 pounds per square inch. And they were able to survive without the shields? Then there's the question of how exactly they can propel and maneuver the Delta Flyer underwater. I can see them technobabbling a way out of it, but firing phasers too? The science makes me sad.

I do think the overall idea of the planet needing an artificial gravity generator to maintain containment is sound though. At 600km in radius, this ball of water is only 1/3 the size of our moon. That's no gas giant. An all-water planet of this size wouldn't generate enough of its own gravity to prevent atmospheric escape losses. Basically the planet would evaporate away, or be blown away by solar winds without a magnetic field and other help.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sat, Nov 26, 2016, 6:37pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S4: The Omega Directive

I do like this episode, but the idea that a pre-warp civilization could come up with this technology is quite a stretch, like Leonardo da Vinci building a functional nuclear reactor. I can understand them being a space-faring but still pre-warp species, but that being the case, why would their ships even have weapons at all, let alone weapons that could damage Voyager? Unless there are multiple space-faring species in this planetary system, or they're routinely raided by warp-capable civilizations, weapons make no more sense than NASA arming the Space Shuttle or International Space Station. They don't seem surprised to run into aliens, so either they have a very non-typical history and relationship with the rest of the galaxy, or it's just a case of sloppy writing. Regardless, if they haven't developed warp drive, then it seems highly unlikely that they would have antimatter weapons capable of fending off warp capable species. Transporting the molecules and their extremely sensitive containment technology also makes no sense.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sun, Nov 13, 2016, 11:00am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Macrocosm

Near the beginning after Neelix was sprayed with mucus, Janeway notes that he has fluid in his lungs, and Neelix corrects her with "lung." A small bit of quality continuity there.

Otherwise, yeah, a silly rehash of Genesis, which was a pretty bad TNG episode too. Lots of dark corridors though.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sat, Apr 2, 2016, 9:53pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: The Pegasus

I'm a little miffed at all of the "the Federation would never agree to such a restrictive treaty" comments. Granted there's a lot of non-canon information about it out there, but the general situation seems to be that the Federation accepted that clause in the treaty in exchange for the Romulans retreating to their side of the Neutral Zone (I believe the Neutral Zone was established prior to that, but I'm not sure), essentially cutting off all contact with the rest of the quadrant. That actually sounds worse for the Romulans, if not for their reclusive bordering on xenophobic tendencies.

Also (and again, it's difficult to separate what little actual canon exists versus fanfic or just speculation) it's entirely possible that the Federation LOST whatever conflict spurned this treaty. Maintaining that treaty could very well be the only thing preventing an all out war with the Romulans that the Federation knows they would lose, again. That's all speculation on my part yes, but it does show how something like this could come up.
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Jeffrey
Mon, Oct 19, 2015, 9:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Destiny

Lol... I find it amusing that some people seem to desperately desire that Star Trek somehow more firmly "take sides" in real life when it comes to spirituality/religion versus secularism/science. As if there is any need or pragmatic reason why they should. Keep dreaming...
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Wed, Nov 19, 2014, 5:30pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: Rules of Engagement

For some reason, that bell the arbitrator rings irritates me to no end. It's being gently rapped by a soft rubber mallet. You call that ringing a bell?
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sun, Oct 26, 2014, 7:42pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Lower Decks

I was always struck by just how much bigger the regulars are compared to the junior officers, both literally and figuratively. Sito and Ogawa are physically quite petite, but even Lavelle and Taurik are small compared to the senior officers, if not in height (Taurik is taller than Geordi) then in build and mannerisms.

Seeing Sito and Picard walking down the hallway or in a turbo lift is quite a striking contrast. Even so, the presence of the regular cast is so "big" compared to these kids that Picard can come across as frightening even while sitting behind his desk.

I just find the dynamic very interesting, and extremely effective. Kudos to the director for using many low angle shots when the junior officers are with their elders, reinforcing the contrast and especially making Picard, Worf, and Riker all that much more imposing.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Wed, Sep 24, 2014, 7:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: A Matter of Perspective

Before this hearing/deposition/whatever you call it on the holodeck, shouldn't someone have contacted the hotel on the planet to verify that they'd made reservations to stay the night, even if they canceled or didn't show up? Irrespective of the whole eye witness and faulty memory arguments, that's one easily verifiable piece of testimony that's pretty critical to the he said/she said arguments being made.
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Jeffrey Bedard
Wed, Mar 5, 2014, 5:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: The Communicator

Imagine this scenario...the alien doctor admits to being astounded at Archer and Reed's alien anatomies. Archer realizes this is the perfect opening to hopefully fix a bad situation. Rather than continue to lie about his identity...Archer confirms that he and Reed are indeed aliens. Give them the rundown of Starfleet (too bad the UFP doesn't exist yet). Explains the historic alliance of Earth and Vulcan and the Enterprise's mission of peaceful exploration.

Imagine that this information opens up the eyes of the alien species (too bad Archer, Sato and Reed visited the planet and we never learn the name of their species). And they let Archer and Reed go, knowing they are not working for the Alliance. And instead of a joke scene featuring Trip's cloaked hand, we end on a scene of the alien soldiers deciding to make an overture of peace with the Alliance.

Would it be repetitive of previous TREK episodes? Sure, but the franchise has plenty of examples of repeating itself. Would it still feature cultural contamination? Of course. But here ENT would be living up to some of TREK's ideals and rather than leave this planet in a state of chaos, fear and a certain-to-escalate war, the Enterprise would be leaving having (hopefully) helped this planet stop fighting with its neighbor. Again, not a new story for TREK. But it would feel better.
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Jeffrey Bedard
Wed, Dec 4, 2013, 6:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Interface

Not bad, but not earth-shattering either. I watched this last night and I was surprised at how subdued Burton's performance once. He had the different emotional tones, but seemed to play them all quietly. I think he should have emoted more.
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Jeffrey Bedard
Tue, Aug 27, 2013, 5:47pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S3: Carpenter Street

Rick Berman once said that he loved time travel stories. Which, I guess, is why TREK had an overabundance of them from TNG on (although there aren't that many TNG ones). I know Braga said they came up with the TCW because UPN told them ENTERPRISE needed to be more sci-fi, but something tells me Berman had this idea for a while. But time travel is not, in my opinion, what TREK is about. It's OK to do one once in a long while, but DS9, VOY, and especially ENT went way too far with it. It's "Star" Trek. Not "Time" Trek. That being said, this is a pretty useless episode. You would think the drive thru scene could have had some good comedy, but the scene is played straight. We're just watching the three of them order burgers. It's a wasted opportunity.
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Jeffrey Bedard
Fri, Jul 12, 2013, 6:42pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: First Contact

I do think that FIRST CONTACT is the best of the 4 TNG films.

One question that stays with me about the Borg in general (although it pertains to this film as well): If the Borg adapt to situations, why is it that at each individual encounter the Borg wait 'til the humans are a threat before assimilating them? After "Q Who" you would think that each and every time the Borg encountered humans (Federation or not) they would start assimilating immediately? Obvously, that would ruin the stories, but you would think that would be more of the case and also make the Borg more terrifying. They're wouldn't be giving us any chances anymore! :)
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Jeffrey
Sat, Jun 1, 2013, 9:18am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S1: Shore Leave

@Strider. No we never see Finnegan again on the series. No mention is ever made of him again after this episode. I read in somewhere that the writers had planned on bring the real Finnegan into another episode, but for whatever reason it never happened. It would have made for a fun scene though.
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Jeffrey
Sat, May 4, 2013, 2:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S2: Return to Tomorrow

@ Grumpy. I get what you mean mentioning how they always say Class M, Earth type conditions (or variations). But I always took that to mean Class M meant, planets similar to Earth, including atmosphere. I've always thought they kept repeating that phrase for the benefit of first time viewers who otherwise wouldn't know what Class M meant. But it could mean two separate things. At any rate, it shows how powerful the Enterprise's sensors are. :)
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sat, Apr 6, 2013, 6:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: Faces

For whatever reason I never liked how Dawson portrayed her human self. I realize she's conflicted and understandably out of sorts, but she's just so timid I want her Klingon self to give her a good smack upside the head. It's not as if all her confidence and strength has to come from her Klingon side.
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