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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Mon, Mar 1, 2021, 1:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Alliances

"The Kazon are supposed to be a deadly threat."

They're a threat in the way that roving gangs of thugs are a threat. They're nothing like the Borg or the Hirogen.

"Basic replicators aren't weapons, the Kazon are already a highly advanced species (just not as advanced as the Federation)."

But they're not an advanced species. They're a slave race that overthrew their oppressors (the Trabe) and stole their ships. They're Pakleds ("we need things to make us go"). The Borg even considered them too unremarkable to assimilate.

Also, replicators aren't weapons in and of themselves, but they can make weapons. Aside from things they hand-wave away as unable to be replicated, they're just matter-energy converters. (X) mass raw material in = (X) mass something else out. Or substitute a huge amount of energy input to get some bit of mass output (E = mc^2). Put in enough raw matter or energy and you can get out a hamburger, a billet of plutonium, a gun, a computer, or any number of parts and pieces.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Feb 26, 2021, 9:36am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The Inner Light

Well, Batai almost died sitting in his garage with the car running, and again when slammed big-time by a drunk driver. Almost. I think Greg landed on the "Could Be" square on his Jump-to-Conclusions Mat.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Feb 26, 2021, 9:26am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Coming of Age

I think Remmick and Quinn were compromised after this, by the very organisms they were working to expose. We see later in Conspiracy that those aliens are very good at identifying potential threats, and either assimilating or disappearing them. Remmick and Quinn were prime targets. While they were never specific about what they were looking for, the whole bridge crew knew they were looking for something, and there's no way that knowledge wouldn't make it up the chain. Ironic that Remmick gets the "queen" alien or whatever you want to call it in the end.

I also think Remmick's portrayal in this episode is about 50/50 genuine and putting on an act. He has no problem being so brusque, but at the same time it's just a means to an end. He's investigating something very serious, and not only is there no room for pussyfooting around, his antagonism could also be a tactic to trip up potential conspirators. The admission that he'd like to join the crew would seem to be his more genuine self, it's just unfortunate that he had to burn so many bridges in the investigation, and also the head exploding thing.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Tue, Feb 23, 2021, 1:11pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Coming of Age

"Bonus amusement at the idea of Starfleet bringing in failed actors for low paying gigs for corporate training (something I've personally done) instead of just using holodeck tech..."

I would hope that the "lab" was at least in a holodeck even if the actors were real. Otherwise that's an awful lot of construction for a two minute test of one cadet candidate.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Feb 19, 2021, 9:52am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S6: Virtuoso

A couple thoughts on the limited music. Getting anywhere into the realm of pop culture would risk seriously dating the series. Locking it in to the time it was produced, so to speak. The old music is so old it doesn't matter, and yet we can still relate to it as civilized or sophisticated. TNG is squarely an 80s TV show, but it does a good job of (mostly) avoiding the tropes of the day, so it holds up. Had Cetacean Ops (dolphin tanks) actually appeared on-screen, Riker played a synthesizer instead of trombone, and Beverly's plays were instead re-watching of The Cosby Show, it would pull people out of the story. Also how much "pop" music from the 1600s do we listen to today? That's where we are compared to TNG/DS9/VOY. Only the best of the best remains, and there's not a whole lot of it. The show could take the Bill and Ted route and make up some near-future music, but without any contemporary 24th century stuff I think it was just too much extra effort.

Also, the music isn't usually the point, so going all-in on something contemporary would be a distraction. If the Doctor was singing something crazy like the diva from The Fifth Element then it wouldn't be possible to contrast his curated repertoire with the algorithm-based synth dreck Tincoo "composed" for her hologram. Similar for Data and his painting. He should be laser-etching holograms in silicone crystal wafers, not smearing oil pigments on canvas. But if he did that, then that's all we the audience would be focusing on. Not his desire to express creativity and understand emotion. There'd be too much "what" and "how" while losing the "why."

The more cynical take is that modern songs, even covers, would require licensing deals and extra fees. When the production won't pay SAG for a couple extras to speak a line, then it's not too surprising they'd want to avoid the cost (and hassle) of getting rights clearances. In a more modern context, there's even the concerns about playing in international markets, where music/imagery/pop culture needs extensive vetting lest it offend China's social gatekeepers. Yes that's a much more recent thing, but even back in the day, bland and inoffensive almost always won out over the alternative. Rick Berman was famously anti-music in the sense that he wanted the musical score for the episodes to be background wallpaper. We only got a little more than halfway through TNG before he fired composer Ron Jones for being too good at his job, leaving the rest of that series, plus DS9 and VOY in a bland musical wasteland.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Mon, Feb 15, 2021, 12:06pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: 11001001

"Riker isn't very likeable in season one, and Frakes' acting isn't always that great either. Nothing worse than a smug trombonist."

He is a bit more combative and dismissive, but not to the extent of season 1 Picard. He was much more grumpy, on top of the smug sanctimoniousness that permeated all characters in season 1, and season 2 as well.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sun, Feb 14, 2021, 12:13pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: Far Beyond the Stars

"I think Brooks really started crying during it?"

Oh absolutely, he went full method in that scene. I think he even worried the other cast members a bit because they didn't realize how big it was going to be.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sun, Feb 14, 2021, 12:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Where No One Has Gone Before

"Wesley's Jumper - orangey red roll neck with chevron ribbing. Reference to the design of the new uniform and his move to crew membership?"

I'd chalk it up to generic 1980s grandma fashion. His frumpy sweaters may have been used to contrast his more polished acting ensign uniforms, symbolizing his growth/maturity/etc. More likely they knew where they were going with the character and just didn't want to spend too much on wardrobe that would only be used for a few episodes. I wouldn't be surprised if it was a thrift store find.

Wil Wheaton said in his review of "Where No Man Has Gone Before" on the defunct TV Squad site: https://web.archive.org/web/20071015030529/http://www.tvsquad.com/2006/10/27/star-trek-the-next-generation-where-no-one-has-gone-before/

"A few minutes later in engineering, Kosinski whizzes on the engine and Riker and Argyle follow as he gets ready to do his thing. Trekkies who may have begun to dislike Kosinski immediately start a fan club for him when he stops mid-stream to ask "why is this child here?" in reference to Wesley Crusher, who is working on a school project and decked out in a really sweet burnt sienna sweater, straight out of famed Klingon designer K'Talh Ba'akQoth's fall collection. (No joke: William Ware Theiss, the original costume designer, had me go to some dude's house to have my colors done. As a 14 year-old who was really into the sweet pastels and bright neon colors of the late 80s, I was horrified to discover I was an 'autumn with a hint of winter, honey,' who would get to wear oranges, browns, greens, and pukes until I finally got my official spacesuit, which honestly wasn't much better.)"
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Feb 12, 2021, 3:56pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S1: In the Hands of the Prophets

"...imagine on Earth a secularist going into a religion community to teach science."

Well how WOULD you approach that, especially when you start teaching about evolution or plate tectonics and the students/administrators insist that god created all life and Earth is only 6,000 years old? I don't see a way to do that without stepping on their beliefs at some point. "Just don't teach those things" isn't an option either.

Also, be careful equating culture and religion. There's much less nuance to that in Star Trek because we just don't have the time for it, but the real world isn't so simple, and in most cases the two are very different. Regardless, the Picardian respect of all cultures is a somewhat naive position that can very quickly lead to dangerous relativism. Some ideas/beliefs/cultures do not deserve respect, no matter how they internally justify themselves.

People deserve respect, at least until they prove otherwise, and one can respect another person even if they don't respect that other person's beliefs. That's why Keiko's response to the question of whether the celestial temple exists in the wormhole "I respect that the Bajoran people believe that it does" is spot on. Jake is being a bit undiplomatic, sure, but he's also just a kid.

The complicating factor of course is that in-universe we know the prophets exist, they are powerful, and they interact with the corporeal world. There's also Q and other god-like beings kicking around, not to mention all manner of crazy space phenomenon. Arguably that makes them all part of the natural world, not supernatural. That doesn't mean people won't worship them. Heck, people worship Donald Trump, literally praying to him. Does that deserve respect?
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Feb 12, 2021, 12:33pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: Far Beyond the Stars

"Sisko is VERY familiar with what happened to the Bajorans"

How so? Yes he knows Kira and some of the others, but had he even been to Bajor before getting this assignment? Did he witness first-hand what it was like living on Bajor during the occupation? Knowing some people and hearing them talk about their experiences doesn't automatically make someone familiar with what it was actually like versus what they were told.

"And yes, racism is long gone in the Federation, which means that Sisko has no emotional connection to it at ALL, nor does any family member in his memory, his father's memory, or his father's father's father's memory. That's why Benny's breakdown makes no sense."

You're implying that Sisko has some sort of agency in this scenario, but I don't think he does. Benny just happens to look like Sisko, and Benny's experiences are witnessed or conveyed to Sisko, but Sisko isn't the one in the situation so his lack of experience with racism is irrelevant. That's kind of the point actually, if you go with Jason R's theory.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Mon, Feb 8, 2021, 1:55pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Survivors

Maybe if Picard had said "you are free to return to the planet, I trust that you will stay there," it would feel a bit more satisfying. Kevin seems content to live out his little fantasy life alone. Not like anyone could stop him from doing otherwise of course, but he appears to have a strong moral compass. Just asking him to confine himself may be enough. Of course I have to wonder if he might get a bit bored of the situation after a few billion years. Maybe he can single-handedly re-terraform the planet one blade of grass at a time.

Kevin's supposed morality notwithstanding, there's nothing to prove what he said about the Husnock. They don't appear to be a species the Federation has encountered before. While Kevin is very powerful, he doesn't seem to be as powerful as the Q. He can't bring back the dead for instance. Rishon and the house and the warship are just illusions, albeit powerful ones. In my comment from 2018 I thought he just wooshed the Husnock away, erased them from existence, but he lacks that ability, he just killed them. So are there 50 billion dead Husnock smelling up a sector of space waiting to be found among lonely planets and warships on autopilot?

I bring that up because we only have Kevin's word to go on as to what he did. Is he guilty? Probably. Do we have any evidence to prosecute him? Other than his confession, no. If he weren't impersonating a human (which is a good point), he's an alien being that wiped out another alien species. Is that something the Federation should or could police, what with the Prime Directive's non-interference policy?
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 10:30am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: The Chase

"I've never been convinced that Picard, the archaeology professor's star student took a sudden turn to a Starfleet career. Why didn't THAT figure in Tapestry? The lack of any rudimentary arc development in TNG is a real pain."

Good point about Tapestry, but Picard's criticism of his blue-shirt self is that he is a man "bereft of passion and imagination". So perhaps he just lost interest in his archaeology.

In general though, it's perfectly understandable that someone could be really really good at something, but still be better at (or prefer) something else. It's not that Picard was on a track to become an archaeologist, it was probably the equivalent of a minor or secondary degree, he just happened to be really good at it, but still preferred the command track.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 10:25am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: The Neutral Zone

@Bob the answer to why the guests are treated so poorly is because this is the first season, where according to Gene, Humans have "evolved out of their infancy" and become self-righteous pricks with no empathy or patience.

As to your sixth paragraph , "'We have eliminated hunger, want, the need for possessions.' Picard what the actual fuck are you talking about? Didn't people buy and sell things on Farpoint?"

I think you misunderstand. This is a post-scarcity society with replicators and nearly unlimited energy. That's why there's (nominally) no money in the Federation. With no scarcity there's no reason for a medium to allocate scarce resources. Yes people have possessions, but there's no longer a materialistic drive for accumulating said possessions. If anyone can have them, there's no exclusivity or pretension, no keeping up with the Jones'. Instead that drive is turned towards self-improvement and fulfillment through other means. Generally when they do bring up money it's when exchanging with cultures outside the Federation, such as the Ferengi or the Bandi (Farpoint).

"Didn't you exchange gifts with the Ligonians in Code of Honor?"

It was a symbolic gesture of friendship and cooperation. That has nothing to do with materialism.

"Didn't Troi's mom have a big honking coffert of things you had to carry?"

Clothes and wigs and personal effects? That's not really relevant either. It's just about comfort while traveling.

"Didn't you go to a café in Paris when you were younger and did they not charge for their surfaces?"

Services. And from what we know about the universe, no, they very likely did not charge anything. Again, post-scarcity. The waiter or chef could be living just as well as a nuclear physicist in such a society, because their job doesn't determine their wages (since wages don't exist) or housing or anything else. Now, the question becomes, who would want to be a waiter at a cafe in such a society, or a janitor, or any number of other jobs? But some people find those things fulfilling and they would gravitate towards them. Maybe there'd be way fewer, or they'd only work a handful of hours per week, or whatever.

"Don't most everyone on the ship have different things in their quarters?"

Like I said before, just having things is not the same as needing to accumulate things to feel validated or worthy or to impress other people.

"Don't your engines require fuel?"

Sure, so what?

"Don't the ferengi exist (and you weren't baffled by the concept of mercantilism?"

Yes but the Ferengi aren't part of the Federation. They weren't baffled by mercantilism because they studied history and/or are familiar with the workings of other cultures. Picard's pronouncements are all Human/Federation-centric, they obviously don't apply to all species.

"And if we look back at ToS, we have merchants in the federation selling tribbles and shit, grain to be delivered to hungering planets, ore to be mined, land to be owned and exploited. What, did all that go away in under a hundred years?"

Possibly. TOS was much more the wild west than TNG. They may have been well on their way in TOS but just hadn't gotten there yet. The Soviet Union, for good or ill, sprang up, made far-reaching comprehensive economic and societal changes, and collapsed, all in roughly the same 70-year time period. Imagine how much change could happen in a society so much more technologically advanced, which also had contact with numerous alien species.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Jan 15, 2021, 9:54am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Darmok

"I'm in the minority, but I thought the ship combat scenes were quite good for the limitations. You can tell they save on cost when they only show isolated shots of each ship firing or getting hit, but the concussive sounds and punchy effects (and yes, the shaky camera) had some serious weight to it."

This was one of the biggest production flubs in the series, where the Enterprise shoots a (huge) phaser blast out of the forward photon torpedo tube. In the HD remaster they recycled the Enterprise from The Best of Both Worlds, shooting properly from the saucer section.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Thu, Dec 17, 2020, 9:24am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S1: Faces

"The stilted speech was really annoying, they were trying way too hard to imitate Lursa and B'Etor. Is that supposed to be how all female Klingons talk?"

Some previous posters mentioned this, but it's a function of talking around the prosthetic teeth. They had to come up with some sort of speech pattern that sounded more deliberate than just "human wearing a retainer and trying to speak normally but failing." The Ferengi actors have to deal with this as well but the way they ham it up seems to work better, especially Jeffrey Combs as Brunt, he owns all the hissing, slurping, and lisping. Also it's easier for actors who play the same part on a regular basis, whereas this was a one-off for Roxanne Dawson.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Thu, Dec 17, 2020, 9:09am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part II

"When Picard ripped off Shakespeare in Menage a Troi I nearly quit the show in outrage." LOL what? Picard was *quoting* Shakespeare. Not the writers, not Patrick Stewart, Picard. Why is that a bad thing? Picard is fond of Shakespeare and even reenacts it on the holodeck. So when does an homage become a ripoff? I find that the best scene of an otherwise crappy episode because of Picard's awful acting. Again, not Patrick Stewart's acting, Picard's. If you look around the series you'll notice that while Patrick Stewart is an outstanding actor, Jean Luc Picard is not. See this episode, Starship Mine ("I'm Mott, the barber"), Gambit, any time he plays Dixon Hill straight.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Mon, Dec 14, 2020, 12:10pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The Inner Light

Warp drive is actually theoretically possible, the physics of it work. We just don't have the energy required to do it. Wormholes are another possibility. Transporters on the other hand...

There's also huge value out in space, even just the nearest reaches of our solar system. The moon may have vast stores of helium 3 which is incredibly valuable for fusion power. Small asteroids are worth hundreds or thousands of trillions of dollars for their metal content alone. We don't even need warp drive to get these things, we just need to innovate beyond chemical rockets, which isn't that difficult considering how far we've come already. Orbital slings, ion propulsion, solar sails, nuclear propulsion are all in the works.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Dec 11, 2020, 11:33am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Lower Decks

"I was a little surprised that Lavelle got promoted. I thought the scene in which he's anxious to talk about the shuttlecraft leaving the Enterprise was intended as where we see that he doesn't have the self-discipline for a higher rank."

Perhaps, but he's still pretty green and there's nothing that says he can't learn (or be taught) better ways. Maybe if he had a mentor like Sito did in Worf he'd be more mature. I was under the impression that he and Sito were the only two being considered for this promotion, and Sito would have gotten it had she not been killed.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Thu, Dec 3, 2020, 1:34pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Past Tense, Part I

"This is economic nonsense. Did the 'loss of farm jobs' cause mass homelessness? What about the transition from horse and buggy to the automobile?"

Yeah actually, it did. Loss of farm jobs led to a flood of poor unskilled people into cities looking for factory work. Some were able to scrape together a living in tenements with 10 people per room and no windows, but plenty were also out on the streets or living in shacks by the river. Overall standard of living markedly decreased during the industrial revolution until there was time to catch up.

The buggy to automobile thing is irrelevant, they were both still manufactured by many of the same people with similar skills. It wasn't until around the post-WWII era that automation began to take over and eliminate jobs. Growth of an industry hides job losses from automation, so it can still be a net win, but growth doesn't last forever.

Something that's often forgotten about the Luddites (19th century skilled English textile workers) is that they actually did lose their jobs and had trouble getting work in the factories that replaced them because not only were fewer workers needed, they also commanded lower wages due to less skill being necessary. They didn't protest and destroy the new factory machinery because they were simpletons afraid of new technology, they did it after they lost their livelihoods because of those machines. Skilled tradesmen replaced by unskilled workers.

The important takeaway of all this is that so far we've been able to absorb or redistribute people displaced by automation to new jobs, but there's no guarantee that it will continue. Considering that half of the American population is too poor to even pay Federal income taxes suggests that we're not doing so great on that front after all. Not everyone is cut out for programming, and nowhere near as many people are needed to fix and maintain the machines as are displaced by them.

Also, this episode isn't saying that these people are all just out of work. B.C. the main antagonist clearly has some mental issues, as do several other people we see. It's suggested that these aren't just homeless people who've been rounded up, but anyone who lost their job and couldn't afford the rent, or even just got drunk and passed out on the sidewalk without their ID. Anyone can be shoved in a sanctuary district with little recourse to get out, but nobody cares since they're out of sight and out of mind. That's what matters.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Nov 13, 2020, 8:57am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Drive

"The least I would expect from Star Trek writers is that they have their astronomy well figured out. Alas, apparently, they have no clue... "

Yep, see this comment I made about Scorpion Part 1:

"Near the beginning when the 15 Borg cubes approach Voyager, Ensign Kim says they're 2.1 light years away. They then immediately show up on-screen right behind Voyager and pass them, despite being at impulse speed. Full impulse is apparently anywhere from 1/4 to 1/2 light speed, so if they were 2.1 light years away, it should've taken the cubes anywhere from 4.2 to 8.4 YEARS to reach Voyager. Even at warp 9 it would take about half a day to travel that distance. Oops."
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Mon, Oct 26, 2020, 4:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: Unnatural Selection

I was always on Team Crusher, and Pulaski is in Season 2 which is still before TNG really got on a roll, so that doesn't help her. Nevertheless, I can certainly see and appreciate what she brought to the table, and I agree that her off-screen departure was unfortunate.

Pulaski's animosity towards Data left a sour taste in the mouths of many fans, myself included, and her warming to him by the end of the season came a bit too little too late. Credit's due for developing her character though. Her moments with Worf were nice, though the history with Riker's dad? Meh. Her prickly relationship with Picard was interesting, but came across as unprofessional and kind of out of place.

I think Crusher gets unfairly maligned too. Like how is it her fault that Pulaski's mind wipe technique doesn't work on Mintakan's? She even said it may not be adaptable to their physiology. Pulaski got some better writing probably because the staff felt they had to sell her to the audience, being a new character, leaving Crusher, Troi, and Yar comparatively unexplored.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Oct 2, 2020, 3:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

"Captain Jellico really shines and shows how the lax, intergalactic pleasure cruise style of Picard is an embarrassment to the Federation. It's surreal that the flagship would be so unprepared."

How were they actually lax and unprepared? Jellico merely saying so doesn't make it true.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Fri, Oct 2, 2020, 3:30pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Offspring

"...why the hell is any business of Starfleet to confiscate a man’s property..."

I think this is actually an even more difficult one to answer. In many jobs, especially tech jobs like programming and such, you tend to see contracts with this sort of language in them:

"The Company will own any inventions, trade secrets, ideas, original works of authorship or confidential information that Employee conceives, develops, discovers or makes in whole or in part during Employee's employment by the Company that relate to the Company's business or the Company's actual or demonstrably anticipated research or development..."

I.E. anything you invent/develop/produce that's similar to your company's business belongs to them even if you do it on your own time with your own resources. If you assume Data and Starfleet are not really in an employer/employee relationship, Data is definitely using the ship's resources even if he's doing it all on his own time. One could argue that nothing isn't Starfleet's "business" so anything their officers do is under the purview of Starfleet. Plus being in a pseudo-military organization, and living on a ship, the line between duties and personal time are blurred even more. On the other hand this being a post-scarcity, arguably communist society, the notion of personal ownership could be completely different than ours. See how many different angles there are here?
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Tue, Sep 29, 2020, 3:35pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Offspring

"Why the hell is it any business of Starfleet to remove a child from their parent?"

I think Starfleet's argument would be that she's not a "child" she's an invention/creation. That's why Picard was so flustered by Data in their first meeting in his ready room. Data looks at Lal as a child, as if he has procreated, and he likens Lal to any child birthed by a member of the crew. The difference is that giving birth to children is an innate part of a human's nature. The same cannot be said for Data. He may have the desire, and the ability to build another android like himself, but that doesn't automatically make Lal his child. The implication of Lal's creation that Picard finds so dismaying is the fact that it's so difficult to do and not something that happens naturally. Yet now that Lal exists, and she's both sentient and sapient, her rights become a factor, but they're still quite tentative.

This is where Picard takes something of a 180. Because Lal is a thinking intelligent being, her rights must be respected. Data thinks of Lal as his child, which is made more plausible given that he transferred his thoughts to her, so even if Picard considers that's irrational or sentimental, he must respect those beliefs and do what he can to protect them. Lal is not the property of Starfleet any more than Data is, and that's what Picard is trying to convey to Haftel when he references The Measure of a Man. While that case did not establish whether Data is a person, or necessarily even sentient, it did establish that he's not the property of Starfleet, and he has the freedom to make choices on his own behalf. If Lal does not want to be separated from Data she should not be compelled to.

We as viewers, having spent so much time with Data already, are perhaps too quick to relate to him and take his side. This episode shows us that Starfleet's position is wrong, but considering how uncharted this territory is, I don't think they came into it from a position of malice or bigotry, because they looked at her as an invention, not procreation.
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Jeffrey Jakucyk
Sun, Sep 13, 2020, 5:25pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Chimera

"...humans alter everything around them to acclimatize the environment to themselves, where as Changelings only alter themselves to acclimatize to the environment around them..." Except for conquering and subjugating every species they come across through oppressive militaristic domination. It shows Laas' (and by extension all of the Changeling's) bias and lack of critical self reflection.
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