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Jake Sisko
Wed, Jan 30, 2019, 6:33am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: All the World Is Birthday Cake

"I also used the term less than nothingness to describe non- existence... but to explicate: it's an abyss. An absence of self, senses, thoughts, being, influencing. A darkness you can't see because you have no eyes. An endless void with no beginning or end while a mechanistic world spins on unceasing, uncaring of your fate. No perception. No escape. The personification of nothing.

That is a taste of my understanding of what I mean by non-existence, what I think of when I think about all of the billions of years before my conception (and all the billions after my death). "

You forgot the one thing that IS there - you. The one that observes this void, this abyss. How else could you know you have no eyes, thoughts, senses without you being there to observe it. That's why non-existence or nothingness is an impossibility.
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Jake Sisko
Wed, Jan 30, 2019, 6:10am (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S2: All the World Is Birthday Cake

"We are always the observer. But sometimes we identify with the events so much so...that we even lose the aspect of the observer. That's why the materialist gets totally lost...and thinks that we could do without the observer"'

From the movie "What The Bleep Do We Know?" (2006)
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Jake Sisko
Sat, Dec 28, 2013, 3:33pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Valiant

I don't understand why this episode has so many haters. Ok, the premise was far fetched and unrealistic, but DS9 has continually chosen to prioritize the exploration of humanistic response in extreme situations over plot logic or continuity. This episode does that in spades, asking the question how far can a charismatic, obsessed leader go and how far will his crew follow. It's DS9s adaptation of Moby Dick.
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Jake Sisko
Sat, Mar 24, 2012, 5:16am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Far Beyond the Stars

One more thought for a bit of irony: when GR created TOS, he had more women on the ship and his future wife was cast as the first officer to Kirk. The network was against this and had him recast a man (Spock!) as first officer as well as reduce amount of women from 50:50 to 1/3 of the crew. So GR experienced first hand a similar censure that the fictional Bennie Russell faced (although it was gender vs race).
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Jake Sisko
Sat, Mar 24, 2012, 4:47am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Far Beyond the Stars

To me, this is a top five episode. I don't understand why people are complaining that this episode has no relevance to Ds9. There are several amazing episodes that also have little to no relevance main arc-wise (Episodes like "The Visitor" and "In the Cards" come to mind). Imho, these types of "non relevant" episodes add extra flavors to create a more complex show that the other Trek series couldn't come close to. Sure, it doesn't fit GR's ideal views on race (true color blindness), but in defense of Ds9, GR only showed us one side of the coin and ignored the other, which is far easier than how Ds9 tries to show us both sides. This episode shows us the side of the coin we rarely get to see in the Trek universe. In the process of achieving a utopian society, we must not forget our dark past and the growing pains required to create a new world.

"Far Beyond the Stars" remains true to the primary reason why I love Ds9; it doesn't hold the punches. The episode is painful to watch because we as an audience are forced to live vicariously through Bennie. It is a visceral reminder of the recent norm we would like to forget. As for Avery Brooks over acting, I don't presume to know what it was like being black in the 1950s. Maybe that type of breakdown was not uncommon in a society that judged people of any color other than white as lesser beings.

Finally, I'd like to say that I think this episode had a positive message overall. As a society, we have progressed from the kind of institutionalized racism shown in the episode and although we are far from GR's vision, we are slowly but surely getting there. I think that by remembering the past, we can move forward towards GR's vision of equality with resolve as opposed to the acquiescent meandering could get caught in if we forget the past.
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Jake Sisko
Fri, Nov 11, 2011, 5:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Statistical Probabilities

Overall, I liked the episode; I like any episode that focuses on interesting characters. The colorful characters, alienation, and the new sense of purpose they found in predicting the outcome of the war made for some very interesting situations.

The only thing I didn't like about the episode was the idea that predictions get more accurate over time. They don't, at least according to Chaos Theory (butterfly effect). Later states have an incredible dependency on even the smallest factor among the initial conditions, which as we saw with Sarina, are not always considered or even known.
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