Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:
Clear bookmark | How bookmarks work
Note: Bookmarks are ignored for all search results

Total Found: 337 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 14
Set Bookmark
Jeff
Fri, Nov 15, 2019, 6:41am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: Point of Light

I don't subscribe to any streaming services. Season 2 of DIS only just came out in DVD and Blu-Ray so I'm only just starting to watch the "new" season right now. I have incredibly mixed feelings regarding the series as a whole and this season so far (even though I've only watched the first three episodes) , but I'll keep my comments to "Point of Light" which I watched last night.

1) A complaint about the tech side of the DVDs (and this happened with the Season 1 set as well). In order to see the captions for the Klingon language on screen, I have to turn on the captions for the episode proper. Then start and stop the episode. Go back the menu and turn the captions off and then the proper captions for the Klingon language will be on screen. Very annoying that i have to do that...still.

2) I wound up going back to turn the captions back on anyway because I had a terrible time understanding what anyone was saying in this episode. There are so many effects added to the actors' voices playing Klingons I couldn't make out half of what anyone was saying. And with Amanda and Michael speaking in whispers so often...I don't think I've ever struggled as much watching anything in my life to hear what the actors were saying. It made it very difficult to enjoy the episode.

3) I knew already that Spock's on screen debut was being purposefully delayed, and even with knowing that it made me impatient to just get on with it already. And for Michael to mention doing something to betray Spock and then not going into detail felt very much like a "TV writer decision" rather than what Michael would truly do in that moment.

4) I really would like someone to tell me who Stamets is on this show? What is his purpose? Who is he as a character? With such extreme focus on Michael and Tilly it feels like everyone else is getting the shaft. I, for one, really would love to see more of Detmer. Especially with her having served with Michael and Saru on the Shinzou you would think there would be more interaction there somewhere along the line. There are so many peripheral characters on this show. I want to get to know them.

I'll end here 'cause otherwise I'll just be voicing concerns and critiques about the series as a whole. I'll just end with this. I like DIS, I guess. There is some unique and interesting things in this series, but I feel like the PTB are going out of their way to make it really tough for me to enjoy this series.
Set Bookmark
Skiffy
Tue, Oct 22, 2019, 11:14am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Vis A Vis

Good point. I never thought of that. That may be what was intended, but they could have at least said something better, like 'injecting plasma into the warp core' or 'aligning the thrusters'. lol
Set Bookmark
Jeff
Tue, Oct 15, 2019, 8:25am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Course: Oblivion

Watching 'Demon' and 'Oblivion' back to back shows this series at both it at it's best and worst. Great technical achievement with amazing effects and true dedication by the design crew, actors and musicians... and failure by the writers and producers to craft a reason for all of it to mean a damn.

Directed by the guy who played 'Potsie' from the tv show 'Happy Days'. I'd rather watch that for some legit substance.

Jammer is right. This is 1 star, just for the people showing up on the set.
Set Bookmark
(Off)Springy
Mon, Oct 14, 2019, 9:27pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Offspring

A solid episode.

I liked the beginning, everyone's reaction when they see The Child, and Picard trying to explain his concern to Data is priceless. Spiner and Stewart are great.

Does the crew generally consult Picard before they procreate? I bet they don't, Data.

Picard and Data reminds me of Janeway and the Doctor - yes, the Captains acknowledge the sentience and indulgence and rights of their non-biological crewmen, but not really. Not completely. Not wholeheartedly.

The Riker business in Ten Forward was a great little lighthearted interlude. Wouldn't want Data to miss out on the "dealing with Lotharios" aspect of raising a daughter.

The ep hammers the importance of relationships, connections, when it comes to "being human/truly alive." At a micro-level, literal connections form in Lal's brain, at a macro level we watch the connections amongst the crew (we open with closed-up-in-his-lab Data finally letting his friends in on his little secret, as doors open and shut. Lal asks about everyone's coverings, and we get repeated references in the ep, to sharing our inner lives, to connecting to others). And we watch the connection form between Data and Lal.

In doing this, the ep also explores the definition of love. Data's attentive, concerned, protective actions toward Lal has Dr Crusher believing he loves Lal. Is love ultimately defined by, expressed by, actions?

There's something else we're hitting on here: What did Worf tell Q, when Q asked what he had to do, to prove he was human? DIE.

A lot of nice little moments, well done. A bit too low key for me to think of it as a classic, but definitely a good one.
Set Bookmark
Jeff
Tue, Oct 1, 2019, 12:28am (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S3: Extinction

Everyone seems to be saying the virus should be destroyed, and I think they've been bit by too many dumb plot retreads.

The virus should absolutely be preserved and studied.

1. Phlox developed a fast-acting cure which renders the threat of the virus very low.
2. This virus does things which are far beyond the reaches of current Human biotech, studying it (even though of course they aren't going to) could leap that tech ahead decades if not centuries.
3. The virus retains at the very least, the genetic code of a now extinct species (discounting their language and cultural dreams). That's something that should be preserved even if it can only be preserved in a virus.
Set Bookmark
Jeffrey Jakucyk
Wed, Jun 19, 2019, 2:23pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S3: Distant Origin

The "trial" with Gegen and Minister Odala at the end is eerily similar to the conversation between Valery Legasov and Chairman Charkov of the KGB at the end of the Chernobyl series, which in itself is not unlike Galileo's situation, as Jammer and other commenters have pointed out.

LEGASOV
I know who I am, and I know what I've done. In a just world, I would be shot for my lies. But not for this. Not for the truth.

CHARKOV
Scientists... and your idiot obsession with reasons. When the bullet hits your skull, what will it matter why? No one's getting shot, Legasov. The whole world saw you in Vienna. It would be embarrassing to kill you now. And for what? Your testimony today will not be accepted by the State. It will not be disseminated in the press. It never happened. No, you will live-- however long you have. But not as a scientist. Not anymore. You'll keep your title and your office, but no duties, no authority, no friends. No one will talk to you. No one will listen to you. Other men-- lesser men-- will receive credit for the things you have done. Your legacy is now their legacy. You'll live long enough to see that.

[Later after asking Legasov about Scherbina's and Khomyuk's role in his testimony]

CHARKOV
You will not meet or communicate with either one of them ever again. You will not communicate with anyone about Chernobyl ever again. You will remain so immaterial to the world around you that when you finally do die, it will be exceedingly hard to tell that you ever lived at all.

LEGASOV
And if I refuse?

CHARKOV
Why worry about something that isn't going to happen?

LEGASOV
"Why worry about something that isn't going to happen." That's perfect. They should put that on our money.
Set Bookmark
saffron
Thu, Jun 13, 2019, 10:58am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: I, Mudd

Well, this one definitely worked better when I was 6.
Harcourt really doesn't do all that much to earn his reputation as Star Trek's Hilarious Clown that the series wants him to be. And I don't necessarily blame the actor for that. Norman, on the other hand, was pretty well acted, a solid robo-antagonist given the material.

The two sisters who play the Alices are actually credited as 'Alice #1 through 250' and 'Alice #251 through 500', respectively. That was the biggest chuckle I got out of the episode this time around.
Set Bookmark
saffron
Thu, Jun 13, 2019, 8:30am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Apple

*un*professionalism, obviously. Sorry.
Set Bookmark
saffron
Thu, Jun 13, 2019, 8:28am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Apple

Ok I liked the adventure elements. I did not care for the sex talk, which is made uncomfortable and unnecessarily stretched out at the same time.

What really bothers me is the blatant professionalism of just about everyone. Why are they constantly insisting this is "paradise", just because a planet *has plant life*? In The Enemy Within, they have a tent set up and collect samples and make it look like they're doing actual field work.

The final straw is an exchange between Kirk and Scotty near the beginning, where Kirk is like "Dude, redshirt just died" and Scotty goes "Oh no, what a shame" and then moments later he goes on about how much he would love to stroll around down there himself. Then Kirk says something along the lines of "Ok gotta be real careful from here on out", then immediately proceeds to pick a flower and mindlessly smell it. It's like the actors and director didn't even care anymore at this point. :D
Set Bookmark
saffron
Thu, Jun 13, 2019, 7:53am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Who Mourns for Adonais?

@ Peter,

well I guess we can give the script credit for at least *giving* her a profession, as opposed to just being a tricorder stand or Apollo demanding a female specimen (which is how many other episodes handle it). I think at one time she's even asked a question relevant to her job, although many more lines about the historical/mythological background could just have been given to her instead of Kirk/Spock.

As for the dialog on the bridge, yes it's cringy and undoubtedly sexist, even for the time. Though I will say Kirk's line about losing an officer is very nicely delivered, as if he's coming to his senses while he hears himself talk.
Set Bookmark
saffron
Wed, Jun 12, 2019, 6:15am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Who Mourns for Adonais?

Here we got a contender for the Laziest Exposition Ever, when upon arrival, the woman just literally asks "so what am I doing here?", and McCoy helpfully explains her profession. To her.
Set Bookmark
saffron
Fri, Jun 7, 2019, 6:39am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Catspaw

I *also* have a soft spot for this one. The Three Witches are another iconic TOS image from my childhood. Watching as an adult, I expected nothing more than a novelty Halloween episode, but this is actually a legit TOS adventure. It has a lot of great lines, which mostly come from Kirk-Spock-McCoy interaction, because for the most part it's the three of them working together by themselves. Is this actually the first time we see just the trio beam down and get to work on a planet? Anyway the image made me smile. You see them materialize and you just know it's *on*. It's TOS time. Things are gettin' *explored*.

The aliens probing for our conscious minds and accidentally reaching the subconscious, as Spock explains, is really a nice SciFi thought. The 'universal images' that are supposed to reside there are a pop culture version of Jungian psychology, which was rather popular back then.

Also, pipe cleaner aliens.
Set Bookmark
Jeff
Mon, Apr 29, 2019, 7:27am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: Tin Man

I was just watching this episode yesterday and a thought occurred to me. If Tin Man is wanting to die, then why did it defend itself against the first Romulan vessel? Either by nova or Romulans, it would've died? Hmmm....
Set Bookmark
SixDifferentWays
Sat, Mar 9, 2019, 10:07pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: If Memory Serves

I don’t about the motivations of the other new commenters, but I felt compelled to respond to what I thought was a wild, unsubstantiated rumor. Not the most graceful way to make an introduction, admittedly, but there you go.
Set Bookmark
SixDifferentWays
Sat, Mar 9, 2019, 8:22pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: If Memory Serves

Are new commenters not allowed? I’ve been reading Jammer’s reviews for almost 20 years, but never posted until today. I didn’t realize that there was a vetting process.
Set Bookmark
SixDifferentWays
Sat, Mar 9, 2019, 6:15pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: If Memory Serves

This was probably my favorite episode of the series, so far. I’m fully aware that part of it is due to the connectivity to the original pilot, as well as its repurposing into “The Menagerie”. But for me, it really worked. I also really appreciated the added subtext that Anson Mount and Melissa George brought to Pike and Vina during their scene together.
Set Bookmark
SixDifferentWays
Sat, Mar 9, 2019, 5:18pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S2: If Memory Serves

Oh, man! @Dave inMN, that was one of the best imitations of those ridiculous anti-DSC YouTubers and their outlandish, wish-fulfillment rumors! Nice one! That one is so out there, but I can see those folks totally buying into it. Ha! Good one. Made my day.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Mon, Feb 25, 2019, 9:55pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Identity, Part I

"Can anyone offer an explanation for why the Kaylon were stalling?"

They hadn't decided to attack yet until the Orville arrived and they met the crew and debriefed Isaac. Once they decided to attack, they needed to make sure the Orville didn't leave because they wanted to capture it. If they had just told the crew that they weren't going to join, the ship would have left.

I suppose you could say that the Kaylons would have been prepared to attack even if they eventually decided not to, and could have done so as soon as their interviews were complete. This essentially couldn't happen because then Isaac couldn't have his going away party and Ty couldn't run off and find the mass graves. But I'm not sure it's that implausible for them to take a few hours to prepare for this. They already decided to allow Isaac back on board for his own goodbyes, which wasn't necessary either.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Sat, Feb 23, 2019, 5:40am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Identity, Part I

"If the Kaylon completely sterilized their world of all biological life, those corpses might actually have been down there MUCH longer"
They probably didn't. The planet still has a breathable atmosphere, and if it had been sterilized, say, a million years ago, the atmosphere probably wouldn't still be breathable. Of course, the Orville writers don't usually put this much thought into the science. Anyway, the Kaylons don't really need to destroy all biological life, just the intelligent life. They might even still have parks and wildlife preserves.

The state of the bones in the underground caverns seems commensurate with a time gap of perhaps a century, although it could be longer if the conditions in the caverns were suitable for preservation.

"Some Kaylon have orange eyes, not sure what that signifies."
There were various subtle differences in the Kaylon costumes. Most notably, Kaylon Prime had different shoulder... uh... pads? Shoulder whatevers. But there were other small differences too, the shape of the chestplate, positioning of the lights, whatever. I wonder if the Isaac costume has undergone revisions and the other Kaylon actors were wearing older versions of the costume, but I can't go back and check because I don't have Season 1 recorded any more.

"Oh, and where is Yaphit?!?!?!"
This had to be an incredibly expensive episode to make, and Yaphit probably just didn't make the cut. We might see him next week (I imagine Yaphit is a pretty difficult, um, entity? to catch, if he wants to hide).

"I don't see how they can make any kind of peace with the Kaylons after they killed a bunch of Orville's security officers."
The deaths of a dozen or so soldiers would likely not make a big difference to the peace process. The Union would be happy to sacrifice the entire Orville and its crew, and more besides, to make peace with the Kaylons. Although I'm sure the diplomats would try to get some sort of restitution in the peace deal.

"All I could think about was VOY: 'Prototype'. "
I thought of that episode too - actually as far back as the first episode, when Isaac's featureless face and the sound of his voice resembled the Prototype androids. It was a little reinforced when the Kaylons referred to their creators as The Builders.
And of course given the overlap in production crew between Voyager and Orville, they had to be aware of that episode when making this one. But the creation of artificial life that then destroys its creator is, literally, the oldest plot in sci-fi. And aside from those similarities, the stories are actually pretty different.

Funny thing about "Prototype," for an episode that was pretty average, it sure was *memorable*. Two decades on, I can remember almost everything that happened, whereas there are better episodes that I barely remember.

"I like Isaac as a character — it offers the intellec­tual power of data but omits the latter’s em­bar­ras­sing ser­vil­ity. An Android who is proud of his non-human qual­ities makes a better crew­mem­ber, and a far better ant­ago­nist. "
I agree about Isaac, but I don't agree about Data. Data is unfailingly polite, but servile? When Data is placed in a command role (Chain of Command, Nemesis, Redemption) he commands, and does so well. Better than Riker, most of the time.

Isaac - perhaps the entire Kaylon race - is a lot like Data, but what they actually lack is a *conscience*. They don't seem to have the outright cruelty of Lore, but they also don't have the fundamental decency of Data. We've seen this over and over with Isaac and his treatment of Dr. Finn. The viewers, conditioned by years of caring but clueless Data, assume that Isaac is a jerk because he doesn't know any better, but now we all get smacked in the face with the realization that Isaac isn't Data, and he's a jerk because... he's just a jerk. And yet he's probably still the nicest member of his species.

"One moment I found poorly executed was the sequence in which Claire's kid escapes the Orville and discovers the catacomb of SPOILERS. Surely such an advanced planet would have detected his wanderings."
Well, maybe. The Borg pretty much ignored humans wandering around on their ships too, both in "Q Who?" and "Best of Both Worlds," until the humans directly became a threat. And the Kaylon planet, being as insular as it is and populated entirely by AI, might not really have need of security. So while I do take issue with how easy it was for Ty to find the graves (or the existence of the graves at all), I don't really have an issue with him wandering around on the planet. Now, wandering off the ship on the other hand, is a little bit of a problem. You can't just open the door to a spaceship and wander off. This is the first time we've ever seen the Orville land; until now there was no reason to think it was even possible. How does Ty even know he can open the door?

"Though why the Kaylon bothered to take over the Orville, rather than destroy it was a head-scratcher...other than to serve next week's plot."
They needed the military secrets on board... but it's not clear why they are keeping the crew alive.

Next thought on the Kaylons: Do they normally exist as unitary beings, or are they actually purely software intelligences that move in and out of physical bodies as needed, like Mass Effect's Geth? I have been trying to figure out what the episode's title "Identity" means.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Fri, Feb 22, 2019, 7:26am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Identity, Part I

I guess my post might make it sound like I didn't like the episode, and that's not the case. It's good, it's just not BOBW level of good. I'll give it 3.5 stars.

I kind of feel like there's not quite two episodes worth of material here, though. BOBW has almost no wasted space. Here they spend two minutes just on the landing sequence. And it looks amazing. But it's a lot of time (and, presumably, money) to spend on a sequence that doesn't mean anything.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Fri, Feb 22, 2019, 7:16am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: Identity, Part I

Good episode. I can't give it four stars because it did drag in places and Ty just wandering off the ship and discovering this massive secret was a little far-fetched. The Kaylons would have just cremated all the remains, or ground them up and made them into concrete filler, or something, and they certainly wouldn't have given the Orville landing coordinates that are literally right on top of a giant pile of bones unless they wanted the crew to discover them. Even Isaac leaving the picture in the corridor where Ty could find it was on the contrived side.

I also felt like the way that Isaac was deactivated was cheating a little. It was filmed with a drawn-out flickering and sad noises and dramatic collapse that unambiguously said "medical problem" when he should have just sat down in a chair and turned off. The crew could have proceeded the same way but without having to try to trick the audience.

I'm also sort of dreading next week's inevitable reset button. But I can't mark that down until it happens. My money is on Isaac changing his mind and saving the day somehow and peace being declared in a way that allows him to continue on the ship, probably by the rest of the robot overlords deciding that his change of heart proves that the humans are worth saving. We already know that the Kaylon leaders aren't telling Isaac everything.

It's nice to get the backstory on the Kaylons, at least. Cybernetic intelligence doesn't just evolve from nothing, so now we know where they came from, and it's not a good place.

Finally, this feels like an episode that would have been better placed as a season finale. People compare it to "Best of Both Worlds," but that's not really a very similar episode; right now it seems more like "Basics" or especially "Descent." But more importantly, it's just so soon after "A Happy Refrain." These episodes needed to be a little farther apart since this episode essentially undoes everything that happened there.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Wed, Jan 30, 2019, 8:25pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Symbiosis

This is an episode that is weirdly both dated and ahead of its time. The "don't do drugs" speech is so incredibly 80s, but at the same time, the stuff the episode is actually an allegory for - painkiller addiction and fair trade between wealthy and developing nations - were not significant issues yet at the time the episode was made.

It's a good test case if you want to talk about the death of the author, at least!

I hope The Orville decides to remake this episode. One of their mistakes is redoing good Star Trek episodes that are hard to improve on, instead of bad ones that could easily be upgraded.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Wed, Jan 30, 2019, 3:56pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: All the World Is Birthday Cake

"Homeward" and "Up The Long Ladder" are generally considered among TNG's worst episodes. Nobody is giving them a pass. "Symbiosis" is slightly above, but it's still mostly disliked.

"Suddenly Human" is an episode about a really difficult problem with no right answer. If Picard's decisions are ultimately unsatisfying, that's unavoidable given the situation. Frankly I applaud the episode for not assuming "humans always right!" jingoism. Maybe the episode isn't ultimately enjoyable, but it's not because Picard made bad choices.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Wed, Jan 30, 2019, 2:52am (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: All the World Is Birthday Cake

@Quincy
"Is laser light actually hard to distinguish from star light? It seems like it would be completely different."
Yes, it's quite different. Lasers are monochromatic and stars have blackbody spectra with absorption lines. But the episode established that the Rigorians aren't really paying attention to the actual properties of the stars, so they might not notice.

If you start thinking about spectra, it creates another problem for the reflector. It would have the spectrum of the local star, which is presumably a sun-like F/G/K star, whereas the star that went supernova would have been something else. 21st century Earth scientists would realize "it's a faaaaake" quickly, but the Rigorians are not very good at astronomy.

The episode could have maybe been better if the Rigorians knew this stuff, but chose to ignore it. It could be their scientists hiding the truth to work around their cultural attitudes, or it could be their society replacing one kind of mysticism with a different "I want to believe!" kind. Either would have been much better than their aimless and unfounded obstinacy.
Set Bookmark
Fluffysheap
Tue, Jan 29, 2019, 10:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S2: All the World Is Birthday Cake

@OmicronThetaDeltaPhi @Dave in MN

I'd believe 100kkm as a maximum distance (the exact size of the reflector seemed quite a bit less than 1km, but it doesn't necessarily need to be magnitude -1), and while it's not technically low orbit, it's low enough. That's only 1/4 the distance to the moon, and lunar parallax is readily visible to the naked eye. They would still see the parallax on the first night.

Since their astrology appears to work like ours (constellations based on the ecliptic), the reflector would occasionally be eclipsed, more frequently the closer it is to the planet.

Also, a reflector wouldn't twinkle.

For a slightly better technological solution, you don't need to invoke cloaking magi-tech. You just need a really big laser at 200AU or so. It can even move to cancel out the parallax from the planet's orbit. That would potentially fool the Rigorians for a little while, maybe a few years.
Next ►Page 1 of 14
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2019 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.