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Colin Lindsly
Tue, Feb 2, 2021, 10:35pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

The video from Major Grin focused on Berman-era Trek for showing how Discovery has deviated from the core values of Trek. It is an incomplete picture, as from the beginning the franchise has shown Starfleet officers believing that it was their duty and obligation to find peaceful solutions and using violence as a last resort.

In "Where No Man Has Gone Before", Kirk attempted to help his former friend Gary Mitchell, who was being transformed, until he had to make the choice to kill him as there was no other choice.

And, in "A Taste of Armageddon", there is this piece of dialog:

ANAN: There can be no peace. Don't you see? We've admitted it to ourselves. We're a killer species. It's instinctive. It's the same with you. Your General Order Twenty Four.
KIRK: All right. It's instinctive. But the instinct can be fought. We're human beings with the blood of a million savage years on our hands, but we can stop it. We can admit that we're killers, but we're not going to kill today. That's all it takes. Knowing that we won't kill today. Contact Vendikar. I think you'll find that they're just as terrified, appalled, horrified as you are, that they'll do anything to avoid the alternative I've given you. Peace or utter destruction. It's up to you.
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Colin Lindsly
Mon, Feb 1, 2021, 11:32am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

I read a synopsis of Alex Kurtzman's interview at TrekMovie. Two quotes caught my attention:

"We’re actually exploring – we’re diving deep into science – in the fourth season, in a kind of new and interesting way."

"There have been many kinds of villains over the course of Star Trek. What happens when the villain is not actually any kind of living, breathing entity, but something else? How do you solve that problem?"

My reaction upon reading this mirrors Data's from Generations:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vrm8TV7K4zo
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Colin Lindsly
Tue, Jan 26, 2021, 10:58am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

How do people feel about Farscape? I have vague memories of watching this show and enjoying it.

I, too, am spending less time at TrekBBS. It feels that NuTrek has divided the fan base. I am sticking in with NuTrek for the ships, if I can see them that is. This is one thing going for Lower Decks. They don't hide their ships in darkness. I don't have an emotional attachment for or an investment in the characters.
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Colin Lindsly
Fri, Jan 22, 2021, 6:54am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

For myself, I remember what it was like to see older Trek. When the season ended, I was excited to see what the next season would bring and frustrated that I had to wait. I haven't felt that way in a long time with Trek.

I have that feeling with other shows now, like The Umbrella Academy, The Boys, The Witcher, The Expanse, The Mandalorian, and Camp Cretaceous. On the last, it's amazing how they kept the pace of the show up throughout 8 20-minute episodes and how the characters evolved individually and as a group.

After watching the last episode of the third season of Discovery, I felt relieved the season had ended and felt no excitement about a new season. In the shows I like, I am noticing that they build layers to their storytelling, plots, and characterization. Discovery seems to like to build the layers only to then tear them down at the end of the season, so it feels like each season is restarting at the beginning. In another show, they would have kept Osyraa as an antagonist and develop her and her organization in a meaningful way. They showed they could do that with the penultimate episode. Sadly, they took a sharp turn, brought her character down quite a few pegs, and disposed of her and her organization quickly.

It feels like Picard took a similar tack with the Romulan secret society and their desire to eradicate synthetics. The next season will probably have a new villain for our characters to go against.
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Colin Lindsly
Wed, Jan 20, 2021, 7:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

Star Trek is a niche franchise. It has more cultural resonance in its country of origin than in the international markets. One of the reasons that the franchise changed so much was that it had be marketed overseas, to make it more palatable for those who did not understand it. It was seen as the talky franchise, so the deep discussions which dominated the earlier films were largely abandoned, and the plots become simplistic revenge porn.

Though late to the party on the last episode of Picard, for myself, the copy-and-paste fleet of the Federation was one issue. The Romulans sent hundreds of ships to destroy an android colony with a very small population. This is like taking a nuclear bomb to an ant. After scouting the colony with long-range sensors and probes, I would expect the Romulans to send no more than one ship to do the action and, maybe as protection, one or two more ships to act as escorts. The Federation would send a squadron of three or four ships to protect the planet.
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Colin Lindsly
Thu, Jan 7, 2021, 12:33pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

Burke

What about LD S1 and SNW S1? Will you be watching those?

We definitely have one series this year to look forward to - Star Trek: Progeny.
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Colin Lindsly
Thu, Jan 7, 2021, 8:12am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S3: That Hope Is You, Part 2

MidshipmanNorris

Discovery has a fourth season, with two episodes having been filmed already. Filming will probably be done by the fall, so it might air in 2022.

Having binged myself on the Expanse the past few days, it is very difficult to return to Star Trek. I began my viewing with this episode, as I have done for the past few episodes, by going to the end and seeing that. Then, I cherry picked what I wanted to see in the rest of the episode.

The Expanse shows how to do everything well and they stay within the rules of the world they have created. When something breaks those rules, they make it a point to say that this is happening and to show how the characters adapt to the situation. There are no easy fixes and there are long term consequences.

In the movie "Airplane", every time someone hears the story of the male lead, they inevitably want to kill themselves. I am at that point with Burnham's moralizing. The monologue at the end infuriated me.

Everything about Discovery reeks of incompetency, laziness, and complacency. It does not feel that the crew are striving to be at their best when making a quality product.
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Colin
Sun, Jul 26, 2020, 9:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Latent Image

Many of the comments above miss the point by saying that the EMH program should be able to flip a coin without flipping out.

Janeway explains that they determined the first time around that his original program (presumably capable of a coin flip) was interacting poorly with his personality subroutines (which presumably picked Kim because of their friendship).

The issue he is stuck with is his later self-assessment that picking Kim for that personal reason is wrong and not consistent with his "training" (i.e. his original coin-flipping programming).

Basically it shows the Doctor has reached so far beyond his original program that he can't keep it together. His new personality is outgrowing his basic functions and purpose.

Jammer misses the point on this, and underrates the episode accordingly.

****
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Colin Campbell
Fri, Jan 31, 2020, 3:57pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: The Royale

Impressive the way Data can correct loaded dice just by squeezing them for a couple of seconds in the palm of his hand.
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Colin
Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 6:55pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Empok Nor

I liked the episode, but found Colm Meaney's performance too flat. He had a mutiny and 4 crewmen killed under his command. Yet he doesn't really have a reaction besides "we'll kill Garak if we have to". O'Brien isn't in charge that often, I think the show missed a big chance to explore a very bad day for O'Brien. I think the episode would have been stronger if we'd seen his report to Sisko, instead of his weak tea visit to the infirmary at the end.
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colincostello
Fri, Oct 3, 2014, 10:32am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Lineage

A watchable episode, rasing pertinent questions about designer babies. I was disappointed that Torres was not disciplined for altering the Docs programm, but I loved the Docs reaction when she asks him to be the godfather. With a name like Picardo, was there any real choice?
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colincostello
Tue, Sep 30, 2014, 5:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Flesh and Blood

An excellent episode, drawing heavily on themes first raised by Bladerunner. Many good scenes and some excellent dialogue. A thought provoking episode. I especially liked Janeways sense of guilt at letting the Hirogen have the technology in the first place. And the doctors gradual awareness that life with these holograms may not be as good as he fisrt thought.
Colin
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colincostello
Fri, Sep 26, 2014, 12:35pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Body and Soul

I really enjoyed this episode. Jeri Ryan gives a virtuoso performance. She and Bob Picardo are 2 fine professionals and they work so well together.
Colin
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colincostello
Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 2:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Life Line

I reaaly enjoyed this episode, It confirms my opinion the Robert Picardo is by far the besr actor ever to wear a Star Fleet uniform. If only the rest of the cast could match this high standard of acting. The only one who can even come close to his level is 7 and their scenes are dekightful to watch.
Colin
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colincostello
Mon, Jun 23, 2014, 11:39am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Blink of an Eye

An excellent episode. This is really what Star Trek should be about. To see a planet evolving like this is inspired SF. There was enough here for a 2 parter, not least to find out about the Doctors children.
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colincostello
Sun, Jun 1, 2014, 4:19pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Someone to Watch Over Me

An excellent episode. The scenes between Ryan and Picardo are wonderful. Ryan's flat and toneless delivery of her lines is very funny as are the doctor's pained responses. And the way she uses her eyes is a model example of how to use the body to act.
The gradual humanisation of Ryan should provide many more amusing moments.
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colincostello
Sun, Jun 1, 2014, 4:09pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: 11:59

A disappointing episode. Not really in the Trek spirit. Well acted, but that is all I can say about it.
Colin
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Colin
Thu, Jan 31, 2013, 10:38pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Call to Arms

I really do like this series the best, and this was a fine season. That being said, a question. How did the Dominion lose in this episode? There was no need to defeat or even attack the Defiant while it attempted to finish the minefield. In fact, all the Dominion had to do was decimate the completely unprotected and still not yet activated minefield in the 40 minutes it had while the Defiant continued its work. It was inactive....and unguarded! And they had a fleet of vessels that were only occupied because they for some reason attacked the station instead of the inactive minefield. Anyone else notice this?
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Cormacolinde
Mon, Dec 31, 2012, 2:45pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Drumhead

I love this episode, one of my favorites of TNG. The inspiration from The Crucible and the HUAC activites (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_Un-American_Activities_Committee) are obvious.

And Picard's speech clearly reminds me of Joseph Welch's "Have you at last no decency sir" speech at the Army hearings.
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Cormacolinde
Tue, Dec 25, 2012, 2:04pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: Yesterday's Enterprise

I just rewatched this episode, and it is a classic - very good story, music and execution.

The plot has its problems, as do most episodes dealing with time travel.

Regarding the "mysticism" behind Guinan's hunches, I find it easier to accept than some other similar issues I've identified in my recent rewatching of the series. In the end, I conclude that Star Trek, TNG at the very least, is not Science-Fiction. It's Fantasy. It occurs in the future instead of the past, like other science fiction shows, but its mechanics are more akin to pseudoscientific fantasy mumbo-jumbo than more serious Science-Fiction.

Take as an example the workings of the sensors. They can scan ships going at warp speed that are light-years distant? In seconds? Not only does this make no sense in a relativistic Universe, it's not even self-consistent!

And Troi's "empathy" isn't more believable either, she might as well have magic powers! She can feel a person's emotions over light-years or in front of her at the same speed? How does that work exactly?

So I take it as fantasy and enjoy the show.
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Colin
Thu, Apr 9, 2009, 10:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: Daybreak, Part 2 (April Fools Version)

Adrian,

Would you kindly grant us those who have a differing opinion to yours the simple acknowledgment that interpretation of the finale is entirely up to the individual? It did not 'end the way it should have', it just ended. The 'Should Have' part is entirely up to each viewer to decide.

Personally, I found that the show's conclusion philosophically did not mesh at all with how I had interpreted the show before the finale. It was an utter disconnect. The writers seemed to focus so myopically on the 'Mitochondrial Eve' aspect of Hera that the final act collapsed around its ears. It shoehorned the characters into seemingly irrational decisions designed to serve that conclusion, stunting them, and ultimately destroying their validity.

Aside of that, this has been one of the best shows I have had the privilege to watch.

Of course, this is all just my opinion. Just don't ask me to 'get over it' and I won't ask you to get over yours.
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Colin
Mon, Mar 30, 2009, 2:10pm (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: Daybreak, Part 2 (April Fools Version)

This post is originally attributed to 'Punchface' on the Sci-fi forum, but I think it sums up the best of the critiques that I've yet read:

The technology is the main point for obvious reasons.

We all die. Our lives are things of greatness and beauty, or they are things of pettiness and ugliness. Regardless, we die. We are not here for long....

...but our works. The works of our hearts and minds, our knowledge, our wisdom, our artifice, these are things that shape the universe and are passed on from generation to generation.

In the absence of the divine taking an active hand in the the management of things, we are alone. We are "forlorn" as the existentialists would say. Because of it, we are the "measure of all things" as Da Vinci said.

With no god to love us or guide us (or with only Ron Moore's capricious and amoral God), we crawl forward slowly but surely. God will not secure goodness and righteousness in this universe and so, for goodness' sake, we must do so. God will not save our souls and so for the sake our souls, we must do so. God will not grant us heaven because there is no heaven and so heaven's sake, for OUR sake, we must make a heaven of this universe.

It is with our knowledge that we move toward the goals. We can not shoot lightening bolts out of our arses nor bring new life to that which is dead but we CAN use the works of our minds, hands, and hearts to create, to invent, to extend our dominion over this universe. We bring ourselves physical comfort and free ourselves from material need and want that we might spend our time becoming wiser or at least more content. We gather in cities that our ideas and communication and commerce might flourish and so our children and our old and our sick are protected from harm by law and by numbers.

These are the ways that we the forlorn, we the sheep with no shepard, make meaning of all things. In this real world that we live in, it is all that we have.

In the world of Battlestar Galactica, it was all that the 13 tribes had as well...though Ron Moore might see other things as more important.

But the majority of his fans are forward-looking secular humanists (which is pretty much what all sci-fi fans are) and to them, the actions of the 13 upon arriving at their Deus Ex Machina planet are an unbearable tragedy on the one hand, and utterly and completely out of step with everything else that the story has ever said or done.

Mrs Ron, your man is so very good at creating moments with emotional resonance, it truly is his forte'...as such, Caprica will likely be full of these tempting moments where we are invited, we are coaxed with great skill and talent, into loving those people, those tribes of Kobol all over again, and, their works, shining tall and proud in the day while glittering like neon jewels at night. Caprica will pain such a picture of a people vibrant and powerful...

...but I'll not be able to love them or their lives and their cities and their art and their 12 worlds, I'll not be able to because there is no hope for them. Their ship is sinking and in the end, the survivors, will, as a group, simply abandon the life rafts to drown in the cold waters of ignorance and savagery. A fate worse than death for death is a punctuation mark on a life whereas ignorance is a punctuation mark for an entire way of life, an entire civilization.

The Cylon bombs did their jobs, the only irony in that is that in the end, those bombs had also obliterated the droppers as well as those who were dropped upon.
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Colin
Thu, Mar 26, 2009, 9:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: Daybreak, Part 2 (April Fools Version)

I was lucky enough to get a response from Ron Moore in regards to some of the Luddite critiques that have been brought up on the Scifi Bboard.

Well, obviously I disagree with this interpretation.

If there's anything that should come through loud and clear from the very beginning of the series is that we are somehow connected to these people. Everything from our system of justice to our clothes to the phones on our walls to quite literally the music some of them hear can be seen all around us, so clearly their lives and their existence were not for naught. The show is making a direct connection between them and us and positing the idea that many of the things in our lives are somehow descended through the mists of time -- through the collective unconscious if you like -- down to us today. In addition, we are all blood relatives to both Colonial and Cylon-kind and therefore their existence is more than simply an ancient curiosity, it's family history. Lee's hope that the best part of themselves would be passed along to the people on their new world evidently came true somehow in some ways large and small and so we're watching the story of some of our own history.

You can dispute the historical evidence of that, can argue that it couldn't have happened that way logically, and that it's simply beyond belief that anything they left behind could have survived down to the modern age and directly impacted our lives, but that's a different argument than saying the show is essentially trying wipe away the contributions of these characters or conveying the idea that nothing they did or experienced mattered in the end. Quite the contrary, the show is asserting not only did the experiences of these characters matter, but that their impact was so significant that it shaped some of our contemporary world. Again, you can argue that's not realistic, but the life experience of the BSG characters is clearly meant to be (big-time) impactful.
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Colin
Wed, Mar 25, 2009, 8:18am (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: Daybreak, Part 2 (April Fools Version)

I'll just add what I posted to the Scifi Bboard:

One thing that strikes me about the ending in particular was Lee's suggestion of 'abandoning the cycle' by reverting in technology. This seems to signify a Luddite perspective. That technology in and of itself - or the goal of gaining understanding and power over the environment is in and of itself corrupting to the human soul. I disagree with that perspective - we are perfectly capable of corrupting ourselves independent of high technology. What is unsettling is the idea that there really has been no actual learning from the experience the fleet has gone through. That the solution is not to evolve socially beyond simply accumulating power for its own sake, but instead to simply voluntarily throw away everything to limit the collateral damage. That mankind's hard-won actual acceptance of the Cylons as individuals amounts to simply a few more people walking around herding goats. That mankind's ultimate solution to its own hubris is not to learn actual wisdom, but to castrate itself in the hopes of delaying the inevitable catastrophe.

What I took the show as (before the finale) was an extended learning session. Painful, brutal lessons in making mistakes and learning to accept 'the other'. Throwing away technology is only part of the personal disgust I have with the ending, it's mostly due to the fact that they also threw away their knowledge, their records, and any possible way of affecting the future course of humanity. Any doubt we have about what they passed on is self-evident in the coda. Humanity has learned nothing, as no wisdom was left to them save pitiful myths and half-forgotten legends. The fleet's journey was to be a genetic UPS service, and even that fails the smell test. Hera valued as Eve, not for herself, her knowledge, her wisdom or culture, just her genetics. Breeding stock.
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