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Carmen
Thu, Nov 28, 2019, 11:17pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: The 37's

Just watched this one. When Janeway and Chakotay enter the bridge in the last scene, unsure of who they’ll find, the acting beats were breathtaking. Every character silently conveyed a different emotion. Paris looked boyishly proud, as if to say, “Look at us, Captain - we’re all standing by you.” Torres showed an equal mix of fierce resolve and awkwardness at the impending sentimentality of the moment. Loyal Chakotay looked relieved and happy for his captain’s sake. Janeway’s actor did a masterful job of almost-but-not-quite giving a choked sob, indicating overwhelming emotion and love for her crew in a pitch-perfect way.

Whatever the unevenness of the episode, that thirty-second interlude was sheer brilliance.
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Carmen
Wed, Nov 27, 2019, 8:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: First Contact

Sorry, my mistake. I meant to comment on a ST:TNG episode. I think it has the same name?
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Carmen
Wed, Nov 27, 2019, 8:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: First Contact

I liked the episode very much, but always felt cheated that Minister Marasta didn’t get cameos in future episodes. It would have been great to glimpse her months later in Ten Forward - chatting happily with new friends, or earnestly studying warp drive technology.

There are two other characters I always wanted to see In recurring cameos: the shapeshifting alien kid who was invited onto the Enterprise after holding Riker hostage, and the orphaned boy whom Worf adopted in a Klingon ritual.
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Carmen
Wed, Nov 27, 2019, 2:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Angel One

You asked who the Yeoman Bettys were. I answered. You agreed that “you’ll give me Troi”.

Is there need for more debate over this sub-sub-subpoint to my original post? I would rather you focus on the substance of my post, rather than questioning two words I wrote... which you’ve half-conceded are right. It’s annoying to be bogged down in debating minutiae - a debate that serves (perhaps intentionally) to deflect from thoughtful discussion.

However: as you wish. My recollection is that during the show’s early episodes, every random female who walked down a corridor or handed Picard an iPad was young, comely, and wearing a Starfleet-issue miniskirt. I also don’t remember any hint that Starfleet made Troi wear a miniskirt because she was “an alien”. That would be quite bizarrely against the ideals of the Federation!

I hope we’re done; I’m not planning to continue this nit-picky line of discussion. I had hoped readers would get something more from my post.
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Carmen
Wed, Nov 27, 2019, 11:19am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Angel One

Chrome:
As I remember, in Season One the male Starfleet uniform required long pants, while the female Starfleet uniform required short skirts. Every Starfleet woman, presumably from Admiral on down, was required by Starfleet’s ruling elite to dress for sex appeal. Must have been embarrassing while crawling through Jeffries tubes, fighting aliens, or going on away missions in windy climates.
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Carmen
Wed, Nov 27, 2019, 8:11am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Angel One

I find a tragic species of fun in noting all the ways that Angel One’s sexism is mirrored in both the Trek world and the meta world and the real world.

First: the male citizens on Angel zone serve the same purpose as the Yeoman Bettys did on Kirk’s Enterprise: they wore provocative clothing and existed to please the Beatas and Kirks. Like thebmen of Angel One, the Bettys of the Enterprise seemed pleased with their short skirts and flirtatious superiors and poor representation in Starfleet’s power structure.

Second: the Yeoman Betty characters of TOS existed to titillate amen please the important audience (male) on their couches at home. The female audience on their couches at home accepted seeing other women portrayed in this way. It was (and to some degree still is) the norm in media entertainment.

Third: the actresses who were trying to make a living in Hollywood suffered the treatment that Angel One men probably got. Want the job? The men who hold power will tell you how you must look, dress, titillate, and who you must blow to get it - and they’ll pat your ass as you leave. Not much you can do about it.

Outside of TV-world, the same sexual discrimination exists in many companies - and for those who think its anthing of the past in America, I’m sad to report that it isn’t. I learned that as a medical resident in the late 1990’s. It only takes a few men in power, and a silent apathetic majority, to ensure that harassment remains endemic. The power structure in many professions ensures that those at the top can and do blacklist any “troublemakers” who bring charges or buck the system. (Try getting a second medical residency after being kicked out of the first one for “insubordination” and whatever false charges the boss wants to put in your file. One bad word from your former residency chair and you find yourself permanently unemployable and still 200K in debt from med school. Same is true at the other end of the educational spectrum: if you’re a factory worker in a one-factory town, or a hotel maid living paycheck to paycheck.)

Furthermore, the Angel One situation is mirrored in politics, legislating and body of law, policing, etc. it is the norm rather than the exception.

And finally we see the same attitudes displayed in microcosm in some of the comments above.

I haven’t seen “Angel One” since it’s first airing, when I was a young woman. I found it brave - though I noticed the irony and hypocrisy of ST: TNG making an anti-misogyny episode when Season One gave us an Enterprise that was rife with Yeoman Bettys, a crying Yar, the care-taking female officers outside the command structure, ‘adoring wife of great scientist’ characters, Crusher/Troi and Crusher/Ogawa conversing solely about romance, and so on. ST:TNG (especially in season one, but throughout its run) preached a 24th century philosophy of gender equality, while displaying a twentieth-century philosophy, and twentieth-century pandering to male viewers.

In spite of that - and largely because a starving woman is grateful for crumbs - I appreciated the episode’s effort.

I cannot think of any other mainstream TV episode or book or movie - in or out of the Star Trek universe - that calls on the male audience to imagine themselves in the subservient position that they have enjoyed seeing women (TV characters and not) prance about in.

It was a disappointment that neither the review nor the first batch of comments (yeah, I quit at DLPB’s opus) gave the episode any plaudits for this. In fact, the violent distaste and refusal to credit an episode that tried to say something important has been.... interesting to read.

I wonder: how many commenters here have had no discomfort watching the decorative prancing of the TOS Yeoman Bettys and their universal sisters in entertainment and gaming - but found themselves all annoyed and upset by the “trite and awful stupidity” of the society shown in “Angel One”?

And now, gentlemen: back to your usually scheduled entertainment.
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