Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:
Clear bookmark | How bookmarks work
Note: Bookmarks are ignored for all search results

Total Found: 30 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 2
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, May 9, 2021, 2:24pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Firstborn

Why doesn't Worf or anyone else in this episode apparently notice that supposed non-relative (gin'tak) K'mtar has identical cranial ridges to Worf, Kurn and Alexander?

(Worf even proudly received a plaster cast of Alexander's cranial ridges once, for crying out loud. The same point can be levelled at Kurn's first appearance in 'Sins of the Father' - no one notices the ridges and realises Worf and Kurn are brothers? Or does everyone notice but it's too sensitive a topic?)

Great guest performance by Sloyan as always though.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, May 9, 2021, 3:12am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Lower Decks

Ah, I forgot we could comment on Lower Decks here.

After what NuTrek has wrought upon us, I was initially sceptical to Lower Decks - well, outright hostile, in fact. An animated 'comedy' series? Good grief, no. The trailer was woeful. No, no, no. It felt like the spore drive, Icheb's eye and Admiral Fucking Hubris all over again, only played for smug laughs this time. After JJ, DIS and PIC I simply couldn't bear any more wanton vandalism of the essence of Trek. So I decided to simply ignore Lower Decks.

But then I increasingly noticed over time that reliable sources were suggesting that Lower Decks was actually knowledgeably and lovingly done, respectful of Trek continuity and the Trek ethos, well-written, plotted and voiced - essentially the polar opposite of JJ Trek, DIS and PIC. So a few months ago I reluctantly took the risk and watched all of Lower Decks in one go.

I was impressed, I admit it. While Lower Decks takes a couple of episodes to settle and the humour isn't always funny, it is definitely put together by people who fully understand and love pre-NuTrek Trek. There are endless, surprisingly detailed and obscure references that are all very skilfully done and offer very rewarding viewing. The cast does well, although as an animation series Lower Decks is a little brasher and breathless in its characterisation. But overall Lower Decks a great, if lightweight, effort that is far far better than its trailer and style might suggest. It isn't a world-changing series, but it is a worthwhile watch.

So if you're looking for an antidote to DIS and PIC and NuTrek in general (and who isn't?), Lower Decks certainly goes some way to recapturing the feel of true Trek. Give it a go.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, May 9, 2021, 2:25am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Thine Own Self

Like 'Homeward', 'Thine Own Self' is a decent and enjoyable episode grounded in a few solid ideas (Data inadvertently contaminates a pre-warp civilisation) with a decent pay-off (he corrects the mistake, but at the ostensible cost of his own life), helped by some strong performances (as others have stated above, most notably Ronnie Claire Edwards as Talur, but I think Spiner does well here too). That we the audience know what radiation is and what it does, while the unfortunate villagers do not, is played very well throughout.

Yes, it's a nice Trek riff on Frankenstein, and no, that does not distract from the success of the episode overall.

I don't understand why Data is still in his Barkonian clothing in sickbay after his face and torso have been repaired though.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, May 9, 2021, 2:15am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Homeward

I liked this one a lot. One of the better Holodeck episodes, with a malfunction playing a more interesting and plausible role than usual.

I very much enjoyed the determination of Nikolai to save the villagers and his clever plan to do so using the Enterprise; I felt both Sorvino and Dorn put in good performances, and their relationship was believable. The way in which Worf was forced to explain the malfunctions as quasi-religious signs was nicely done.

It struck me that many viewers might question the long-term biological viability of a saving a civilisation based on what seems to be just 20-30 founding individuals, but it is possible: I was reminded of the mutiny on the Bounty in 1789 which ultimately saw nine British mutineers and 20 Polynesians settle on Pitcairn Island in the Pacific. By 1856, their numbers had increased to 193; and there are now nearly 1000 people of Pitcairn descent worldwide (mainly on Norfolk Island and in Australia and New Zealand).

The one thing I very much disliked about the episode was the absolutely throwaway suicide of Vorin. I actually like it when representatives of pre-warp civilisations are shown the great big universe out there - there's a long history of it in Trek, and it's usually handled with a wholesome sense of wonder and awe. 'Homeward' is however one of the very few times such an encounter is portrayed as having an almost wholly negative and traumatic impact: it would have been much better to see how Vorin integrated his experience back into his Boraalan everyday life (or not, as the case might have been). But no; we're robbed of this, and Vorin's entire arc is ultimately swept aside in an appallingly perfunctory manner, with Crusher covering Vorin's body with a blanket and engaging in some idle, almost glib, speculation as to why he did it.

That said, 'Homeward' is still one of the better episodes in season seven. A solid hour.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, May 9, 2021, 1:40am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Masks

Boring, confusing and a frustratingly pretentious chore to watch. Definitely one of Trek's worst episodes.

One bit of praise, though: the Enterprise being gradually re-made or re-constituted by an eternal force is an interesting idea, but the particular execution of that idea is absurd, laughable and unengaging.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Mon, May 3, 2021, 4:02pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Timescape

Virtually a perfect episode in my view, and quintessential TNG. While most people prefer 'Cause and Effect' over this, I actually find 'Cause and Effect' (though brilliant) to be too repetitive and monotonous by comparison.

The frozen time effects in 'Timescape' are extremely eerie and effective (however they were achieved), and the mystery, shock revelations and confusion are marvelously portrayed and played. The pacing is excellent too, as is the misdirection concerning what the Romulans are doing on the Enterprise in the first place.

I particularly enjoyed the round table critique of the conference by each character on the runabout at the start (Troi's impression particularly), which very elegantly gives way to the frozen time set-up.

All in all, 'Timescape' is just a wonderfully executed episode in almost all regards, and a very satisfying hour.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Mon, May 3, 2021, 3:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Attached

Quite alarming to see Picard settle down for an ostensibly good night's sleep with his bare pate only a few centimetres away from a raging campfire.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Thu, Apr 29, 2021, 3:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: The Chase

I certainly always felt that this episode was a valiant attempt to base an episode on the discovery and early development of language families via comparative linguistics in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as Alexander above pointed out, and I have always been fond of it for that reason alone.

It was by the way particularly enjoyable to read the very considered speculation by Murphy, Chrome and Peter G. above about the possibility of some kind of link (no pun intended) to the Founders, which I had never considered (beyond the use of Salome Jens in both cases of course). Would have made a great follow-up DS9 episode.

Ultimately, I will always have a soft spot for this episode because it at least tried to offer an in-universe explanation for the striking ubiquity of similarity (i.e. humanoids) in Trek. And no, like the Klingon forehead issue, this was of course not necessary (I very much understand why some say addressing such matters creates more problems than leaving well alone); but it was nevertheless an acknowledgement that I liked, much as the universal translator and technobabble are nods to other in-universe problems that I also like mention of.

Once again, of course, Trek writers prove that they have no grasp whatsoever of evolution, and that is really where this episode falls flat on its face.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Fri, Apr 9, 2021, 12:54am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Brothers

@ Mal

Yes! And when you go back and watch the clip, the twitch that Data does at '888' and again at '764' is excellently done by Spiner.

Love it.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Fri, Apr 9, 2021, 12:48am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Brothers

@ microfish

That entire process - from the moment something first goes wrong with Data, all the way through the crew's frantic attempts to stop him to the password scene and his matter-of-fact escape - is the very best part of the episode and one of the most impressive shipboard computer-centred action scenes in TNG as a whole.

'Power Play' does similar very well later on too.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Thu, Apr 8, 2021, 3:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Power Play

Always loved this episode.

Simple and effective cat-and-mouse plot guided by a commanding performance by Sirtis, a strikingly menacing role for Data, and a truly unsettling turn for O'Brien (nicely turned on its head later in DS9 when Keiko experiences something very similar).

No pretensions and just a good solid hour.

It's also nice to see mention of a Daedalus-class ship.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Fri, Apr 2, 2021, 5:43am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: First Contact

Truly brilliant episode which is incidentally the exact halfway point of TNG (episode 88/176*).

(*Yes, I know 'Encounter at Farpoint' and 'All Good Things...' are sometimes counted as two-parters, thereby making 'Galaxy's Child' - episode 89/178 - the midpoint.)
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Fri, Apr 2, 2021, 4:43am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Remember Me

@ Sole S. Survivor:
You eloquently put moving words to many of my own feelings about 'Remember Me'. Thank you for posting this.

It is a testament to the abilities and scope of the writer, cast and production team that this episode can still evoke such complex emotion.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Tue, Mar 30, 2021, 2:45pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Half a Life

Watching this again I was surprised to see a microphone boom clearly follow Lwaxana in the mirror as she moves over to Troi in the scene in Troi's quarters.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Thu, Mar 25, 2021, 3:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Night Terrors

Felt like an attempt at a Hallowe'en episode even though it was first broadcast in March.

While I do enjoy abandoned drifting starships and eerie mysteries, and very much enjoyed seeing all those lovely fly-by shots of the most infamously mis-spelled Miranda-class vessel in Starfleet, I find poorly acted paranoia (and even well-acted sleep deprivation) less enthralling to watch for a solid hour.

Nevertheless, I thought the notion of having to communicate (or interpret, depending upon your perspective) the co-ordinated injection of volatile elements with unseen aliens in a different realm in order to create (by total chance) a very-last-second one-shot chemical explosion based on nothing more than sheer conjecture and guessing (and funnelled via an actual sleeping crew member) to be rather novel, to put it mildly.

Lucky it worked, eh?
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Thu, Mar 25, 2021, 2:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Identity Crisis

Not much to be said about this one.

I thought the ultraviolet aliens were impressively done, and the moment where ultraviolet Geordi's by now very alien hand reaches out trustingly to take Leijten's (and the subsequent reassuring hug) was surprisingly moving and well played.

It was also nice to see a character such as Leijten who was introduced without simply being killed off to advance the plot as is otherwise typically the case. I rather liked her and Geordi's friendship, and it's always a plus to see regular crew before they became regular crew.

That said, as much as I enjoy computer- and holodeck-based extrapolation scenes, the visual recording on which past events (and thus the entire plot) hinged seemed somewhat implausible.

I also found it frankly absurd that no physical attempt was made to prevent the shuttle from breaking up. The Enterprise had a full minute to act in which it could have manoeuvred closer to lock on with a tractor beam or use the transporter but instead the clock ticks down (in real time) with Picard saying stop or I'll ask you to stop again. Very odd.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Wed, Mar 24, 2021, 6:26am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Devil's Due

'What does Satan need with a starship?' etc.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Wed, Mar 24, 2021, 3:26am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Clues

Oh, and one other puzzling aspect: unless I have misunderstood, we actually see (in the flashback) Picard ordering, in extremely strict, final, and absolute terms, that Data is never to under any circumstances reveal what has transpired.

So (again, I cannot help but feel I have missed something here), why does Data ultimately divulge the entire course of events in full detail? I realise it is for the benefit of us the viewers but it has no logical internal justification in the episode. When Paxan-possessed Troi appears on the bridge, and the crew demand an explanation, Data should have continued to say nothing and leave the crew to their confusion. Or did Data reason that, as the Enterprise-D was about to be destroyed by the Paxans, the basis for the original order (avoiding the destruction of the ship) no longer applied? And was Data, during the second round of tidying up the clues, disciplined by Picard for disobeying his original very absolute order?

I am being a little facetious on that last point, but it is yet another example of how this (very good) episode unravels if you pull at its fraying edges.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Wed, Mar 24, 2021, 2:06am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Clues

A very enjoyable episode, despite obvious caveats that fail to stand up to much scrutiny (most of which have been listed in detail by other commenters above).

While I understand the 'thirty seconds of unconsciousness' ploy on which the plot hinges was intended as a dramatic tool upon which to build an accumulation of further clues, it is strikingly unnecessary and fundamentally undermines the episode. Data simply informing the crew that they had been unconscious for the entire missing day (or two days) would have headed off a slew of later problems, not least with Starfleet. When one considers that Data's freedom is ultimately at stake in choosing this deception, it is a irrationally high risk decision on Data's part.

Also, what is stopping Picard and the crew simply repeating their mistake and finding clues the second time round? It is hard to believe a second round of tidying up eliminated absolutely everything when the first round failed to do so and their memories have been wiped. Again, a very high risk approach when the crew's lives are hanging in the balance.

That said, the revelation of the clues is very much an intriguing and unsettling mystery, played very well with some memorable performances by Spiner, Stewart and the rest of the crew. Troi's piercing scream and her panic about the mirror (which is never actually explicitly explained) always disturbs me as a true horror moment.

Watching this again, I'd also forgotten about the overly lengthy return to Picard's Dixon Hill holodeck fantasy from S1. The inclusion of Guinan (great fun performance by Goldberg as always) makes this more worthwhile than in S1, but Dixon Hill still does not fit with Picard's personality in my opinion.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sat, Mar 13, 2021, 5:35am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Remember Me

@ Bob (a different one)

Yes, Peter G's comments - about 'Remember Me' being an essay on loss, and on the (positive) effect our existence has on others (and the positive effect others have upon us), all of which we consistently under-estimate - are spot on.

Peter G and William B also rightly point out that 'Remember Me' is a lovely companion episode in tone and topic to the far more famous 'All Good Things'. (Indeed, in a very interesting decision, the original roles of Crusher and Picard here are actually inverted in the later episode, but 'Remember Me' came first!) Two outstanding hours.

Riker's palpable frustration is fun too.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Wed, Mar 10, 2021, 2:22pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Remember Me

One of my very favourite TNG episodes.

It's a brilliant depiction of mental fortitude, trusting one's own instincts and memory, and the quiet power of staying calm and holding out when under great pressure from confusion, facing implicit doubt from others and a context that is suddenly shifting around you beyond your control.

Crusher's absolute tenacious refusal to give in to the universe (!) shrinking inexorably to just 705 metres enveloped around her, and her persistent, valiant attempts to persevere through reason and theorise her way out of that dread fate - with only the computer as a final, dispassionate companion dependent on the right questions being asked the right way as the clock nevertheless ticks urgently down - shows (quite optimistically in my view) the spirited ingenuity at the core of us all as human beings. It is a fine metaphor for our stubborn struggle against the inevitability of our own passing.

The slow, dwindling disappearance of the crew is eerie, and made all the more vividly unsettling by them being portrayed as never having existed at all. There's something deeply, deeply moving about Crusher's strident determination to remember everyone she's lost; it strikes right to the heart of being human, of the human condition and the passage of time. That urge to never forget and to thereby save and honour a little of what went before. Because if no one remembers us, have we really existed at all? What if you are the very last person alive in existence?

I personally find 'Remember Me' to be an exquisite episode. Not only does it address some intriguing and unusual issues, but it's also a very engaging and well-packed hour while doing so, with some clever twists (such as the flash of light being Wesley, La Forge and the Traveller trying to fetch Beverly back), and an imaginative use of the computer as a scientific sounding board for heightened suspense. The way in which the crew begin by pointedly helping and trusting Beverly rather than by simply dismissing her as insane is also refreshing. I also love the graphics of the bubble slowly consuming the Enterprise-D and the link to Where No One Has Gone Before - and that Beverly is actually brilliantly centre stage for once (all too underused and misused as a character).

Bravo. Classic TNG and classic Trek.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Tue, Mar 9, 2021, 12:49am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S7: What You Leave Behind

I don't have anything substantive to contribute. I just want to state how fascinating, thought-provoking and welcome the last few comments (Jason R et al) in this episode thread have been.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, Feb 28, 2021, 6:23am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Defiant

@ Bob (a different one)

Agreed. One of my favourite DS9 episodes, and I too found it frustrating that they never followed it up. At the time the reveal that 'Riker' was Tom Riker was completely unexpected (for me, anyway), and played well. The scene between O'Brien and 'Riker', as others have noted, was cleverly done. There's just the right amount of baiting the viewer, leading one to realise something is amiss - or has been missed.

Tom Riker was always a fascinating and tragic character, and this episode also shows one of the better uses of the often poorly utilised Maquis in Trek. I also very much liked the focus on the Defiant as advanced technology that others would covet, and the interactions between Tom and his Maquis bridge crew.

A successful episode that brought together TNG and DS9 in an accomplished way in my opinion.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, Feb 28, 2021, 6:06am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S3: Carpenter Street

Wouldn't be Trek without an episode in which the crew travel back to the approximate year the show is being broadcast.

Dated badly as a consequence.
Set Bookmark
Bok R'Mor
Sun, Feb 28, 2021, 6:02am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Generations

I must be the only person grateful for the (notorious) 'uniform confusion' in this film, as for me at least it solved the in-universe puzzle of there apparently being two competing service uniforms in use at the time (one in TNG and another in DS9). This film inelegantly provided the elegant solution of the DS9/VOY uniform being the newer replacement being gradually and haphazardly rolled out throughout the fleet.

Of course, it doesn't explain why TNG-era uniforms continue to show up throughout later seasons of DS9...
Next ►Page 1 of 2
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2021 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. Terms of use.