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HackFarlane
Fri, Aug 23, 2019, 9:49am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Unnatural Selection

I am also one of the voices on this board that actually prefers Dr. Pulaski over Dr. Crusher. She and Picard had a great dynamic, and I really love, unabashedly, what they did with Pulaski and Worf, after Worf got "the Klingon measles" in an episode near the end of the second season.

"Unnatural Selection" was a great vehicle for Pulaski and for Diana Muldaur. We got to see Pulaski's foibles and stubbornness but also her warmth for humanity. She even apologizes to Data while she's on the shuttle with him, which I thought was a nice little touch of dialogue. I think everyone involved really made an effort to create a well-rounded character in Dr. Pulaski, and I would have liked to see more of her.

As for the continuity issues raised in this episode, specifically in regards to, "How could the Federation allow Darwin Station to experiment like this, considering what happened with Khan and the Eugenic Wars," I will simply chalk it up to this episode taking place in an alternate universe where the Eugenics Wars never happened, and there never was a Khan Noonien Singh.

Also, I can't explain why, but I cracked up at the arrogant, snotty Dr. Kingsley who oozed contempt and snapped at Picard through the viewscreen. She's exactly the type of haughty, vicious scientist-with-a-God-complex that would run a station and experiments like this. It was a nice touch that she knew who Pulaski was, because of that "Linear Models of Viral Propagation" paper that Pulaski wrote.

I'm conflicted on the transporter solution at the end. In its favor, we really don't know how the science behind it works, because, frankly, it's preposterous. But as it is, I can wrap my head around a system that converts matter into energy, and then recreates the matter after traveling through subspace to another location, being able to reform "another version" of the subject by superimposing a trace pattern. (I'm not sure if that even made any sense, but it's no harder to believe than warp drive. ) I can even forgive this can-of-worms being ignored in future episodes and movies because it was shown to be incredibly risky--they almost lost Pulaski, so it doesn't strike me as something that anyone would want to risk attempting again. And besides, if this episode took place in an alternate timeline, there are plenty of parallel universes where it never happened, so it wouldn't be brought up in a future show as a solution anyway.

However, I do understand the criticisms that the solution was an overly-simple, ridiculous deus-ex-machina and that they could have come up with something more inventive.

Also, it seems to me that they should have heard of space suits or even simpler Haz-Mat suits, but I know--Paramount budgets. I also think the message of the episode was simplistic and obvious. But I do like how it showcased the Picard/Pulaski dynamic; Muldaur and Stewart were both marvelous.
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HackFarlane
Thu, Aug 22, 2019, 4:11pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Bounty

I agree with Strejda. Of course Rick Berman & Brannon Braga wrote this. One of them actually admitted to an interviewer that he has an ongoing fantasy of crawling up into a giant woman's vajayjay. I'd say "A Night in Sickbay" makes a lot more sense in that context.
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RandomThoughts
Tue, Aug 20, 2019, 2:53pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Wounded

Strange how something can just strike a person so funny:

Kardashian War...

I had to take off my glasses, wipe my eyes, take a sip of coffee, all before I could continue.

I'm picturing nice-looking but largely expensive, useless ships; with huge engines.

Enjoy the day everyone... RT
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Yanks
Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:49am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: In the Flesh

Jason,

Your first point is really moot.

I (Federation) have the knowledge and technology necessary to "open a rift" (or whatever they called it) into fluidic space. While the ships linking together is impressive, I'm prepared to conduct random genocide in your backyard... my resources are limitless and my resolve is absolute. .. as a matter of point, we have currently manufactured and stationed in excess of 1 million warheads (the big ones) ready to deploy....

I do agree with you (see my comments above) about this episode and species 8472. They neutered a GREAT villain... better than the Borg in my view.
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Andrew
Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 8:53am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Nothing Human

^I think the title was just arguing that the research experiments were inhuman/inhumane, Janeway and the crew were confronted with that and in choosing to use them maybe they started down or continued down that dark path.
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Yanks
Sun, Aug 18, 2019, 6:40pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: In the Flesh

I don't know that anyone is being unfair to anything.

What I'm saying is that it's more than plausible for species 8472 to do this using the information they had, albeit patchy and incomplete.
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Yanks
Sun, Aug 18, 2019, 3:37pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: In the Flesh

@ Chrome
"So the Dominion comparison is invalid and Rahul’s criticism is fair."

So what's wrong with species 8472 practicing in the Delta Quadrant?

They are telepathic, so they could gain the necessary info from their contact with the Voyager crew and any Borg they linked with. The Borg had federation/Earth knowledge.

Remember, we (Federation) had an incredibly powerful weapon against them. One in which they had no defense... seems like a plausible angle for them to take.
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Yanks
Sun, Aug 18, 2019, 12:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: In the Flesh

@ Chrome’s Voyager Alt

"Of course The Dominion had a stable wormhole so, yeah."

For what we know about fluidic space, it might just be a simple as setting a point and entering our space. It might be like a mobile borg transwarp hub. Distance might be irrelevant.
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Brian
Sun, Aug 18, 2019, 2:14am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: The Crossing

Trip holding up the slice of white bread and asking "Have you tried this?" is one of my favourite moments in Star Trek.

Otherwise - yeah, fine but unremarkable. So, sure, two stars. Worth watching the white bread moment, though.
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Jonathan Byrd
Sat, Aug 17, 2019, 4:39pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: Caretaker

I'd give star trek voyager a 4 star review; if it wasn't for the fact that every time I bring up the fact the Newton's "What goes up, must come down" Law of Nature was never a applicable law of physics, and ask some lefty, "Really MoFo', it was never a law; if so, when in the hell is the Voyager 1 probe going to fall back down?!" and they answer, "25 years at maximum warp." ....other than that, I give it full stars
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HackFarlane
Fri, Aug 16, 2019, 8:48am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: The Offspring

"But to engage in a moment of levity for a moment, not only does Data use contractions in the episode (“I’m” and “you’ve”), but he does so immediately after reminding everyone that he can’t. It’s almost like they did it on purpose to be playful or something."

Joe Menta, I'm inclined to agree with you. I think they did it as a running gag or Easter egg. The same thing happened in the first-season episode "Datalore." In that show, one of the explicit ways to tell the difference between Data and Lore was that Lore used contractions. It was a plot point in the final act. But at the end of the episode, there's Data on the bridge after Lore had been beamed away, and yes, Data uses a contraction. Amusing!

Of course you could always argue that the final scene takes place after a shift to an alternate universe where Data is able to use contractions as liberally as humans do. Haha.
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HackFarlane
Fri, Aug 16, 2019, 8:32am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Parallels

DidWorf?:

"Did worf return to the correct Enterprise though? At the beginning of the episode it starts out with worf receiving a surprise party but at the end of the episode troi said she knows how he hates surprises and talked riker out of throwing one for worf.

If it was the same universe then shouldn't events unfolded the same?"


DidWorf?, I think it was established that Worf started enterting parallel universes before he even returned to the Enterprise, during his shuttle trip. Therefore, the first time we see him on the Enterprise, having his surprise party that Riker threw despite telling him, "I hate surprise parties!" as a prank, he is already on a "wrong" Enterprise in terms of this story. So at the end, the intimate party he was with Troi is the "correct" universe.

That being said, I'm a firm believer that every continuity error and "canon violation" in STAR TREK shows can be easily dismissed by assuming that the episode or film in question takes place in an alternate universe/timeline. This exact episode, "Parallels," defines this concept beautifully. It's an easy way to counter paltry arguments about STAR TREK continuity errors or altered character development (I.E., Captain Janeway's "bipolar" personality changes). And it's no more hard to believe than warp drive, transporters, or DNA "resequencing."
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Alessandro
Thu, Aug 15, 2019, 9:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: Blood Oath

I find this episode superb. The authors show great respect for the Klingon culture, contrary to what those idiots in Discovery have done to Klingons, beneath comptempt.
I also love how Jadzia behaves herself, she had no obligations.
Episodes like this persuade me that DS9 is the best Star Trek series
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The Man
Wed, Aug 14, 2019, 6:41pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S3: Rise

Actually the 300 kilometer pole in the ground reaching into space is believable because it's a space elevator and scientist are looking for ways to build one right now.
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Brian S.
Wed, Aug 14, 2019, 2:28am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: Let That Be Your Last Battlefield

>"Unfortunately, the allegory is too preachy and pretentious and fails to say anything except in the very broadest of terms."<

Sometimes, messages need to be preached, and sometimes the broadest of terms are required for it to be heard.

++++

>"Prejudice has many troubling shades of grey that this story fails to acknowledge."<

True point. But this was broadcast in an era where MLK had recently been assassinated and where only six weeks earlier Star Trek had aired the first interracial kiss on US television, to the dismay of some regional censors.

This episode was written for an audience that was still struggling with (and often against) the concept that "Segregation = Bad"

There are absolutely shades of gray to be explored....1969 was not the time or place for those. Hard to dive too deeply into nuance with an audience that barely understands or accepts the basics.
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Brian S.
Wed, Aug 14, 2019, 1:58am (UTC -5)
Re: TOS S3: The Paradise Syndrome

Watching these episodes through streaming services in rapid succession is jarring....

KIRK: "Hey Bones, this indigenous woman and I just had some stones thrown at us. I'm a little banged up, but apparently none too worse for the wear. Stay with her. Do what you can."

*McCoy scans Miramanee, discovers she's carrying Kirk's child*

(30 Minutes later)

MCCOY: "She had bad internal injuries, Jim. "
KIRK: "Will she live? "
MCCOY: "No."
KIRK: "No? No?!? Wasn't it just 2 episodes ago where you successfully surgically reattached Spock's brain after it had been stolen from his skull?! And now you're telling me you can't heal a woman with a few internal injuries sustained from some rocks."
MCCOY: "Do you want to explain to Starfleet Command how a woman on an alien pre-warp pre-industrial civilization ended up birthing your child?"
KIRK: "I'll love you, Miramanee. Always."










MCCOY: I swear that's honeysuckle I smell.
KIRK: I swear that's a little orange blossom thrown in. It's unbelievable. Growth exactly like that of Earth on a planet half a galaxy away. What are the odds on such duplication?
SPOCK: Astronomical, Captain.
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HackFarlane
Tue, Aug 13, 2019, 1:17pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Wounded

I have no trouble believing that the Rutledge's crew could be in agreement with Maxwell's plan. This is a battle-hardened crew that probably had experiences during the Kardashian war that mirrored O'Brien's. O'Brien even starts to stick up for Maxwell early in the episode before Picard cuts him off. Loyalty like that is hard to come by, as Picard even says to Gul Macet at the end. On the Rutledge, it also appears that Maxwell was a lot more "chummy" with the lower ranks than Picard is. He's more of a friend to the crew than a distant leader.

The Enterprise-D apparently didn't see much action in the war, unless this episode takes place in an alternate timeline/universe, of course. It's a luxury liner, whereas the Rutledge is a sparse tactical vessel with a crew of maybe a hundred at most. Things would be a lot different on that ship, especially with a war-weary crew. I figure the crew was with Maxwell all along and would never have voiced an objection to the captain that had kept them alive all those years in the war.

However, it's also possible that the Rutledge crew was starting to mutiny behind the scenes as Maxwell became unhinged after meeting with Picard. The Rutledge was turned over to its first officer for the trip back, meaning that the Enterprise could probably trust that the crew would accompany them back to the starbase properly.

Either way, it doesn't strike me as a plot hole at all.
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The Man
Sun, Aug 11, 2019, 9:26am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

I would also argue that Tuvok and Neelix were clearly still conscious in Tuvix's head by evidence of his comment to Kes calling her "Sweeting."
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The Man
Sun, Aug 11, 2019, 9:23am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

@Peter G. And if you are going to ignore the fact that two men are clearly still alive but are dying then you're wrong. As for saying they don't have rights because they are gone that's like saying that a person in a coma or is incapacitated doesn't havdd rights. They do, and if they can't speak for themselves they have loved ones that speak for them, they don't just rot away and die like you seem to think that Neelix and Tuvok should have done. Just like an incapacitated person who needs medical care and can't speak for them, Captain Janeway, Kes, and the crew spoke for them when they could not defend themselves.
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The Man
Sun, Aug 11, 2019, 9:17am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

@MAX you're wrong max, clearly Neelix and Tuvok werent dead or else they would not have been brought back. And all of this nonsense of "murdering" Tuvix, what about Neelix and Tuvok? They deserved to love and their only voices were the Enterprise crew.
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Shannon
Sat, Aug 10, 2019, 5:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

Yanks, it makes me think the writers were more clever about writing this one than I first suspected.
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Yanks
Sat, Aug 10, 2019, 4:50pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

What too many comments on this episode fellas :-)
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Yanks
Fri, Aug 9, 2019, 10:10am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Virtuoso

HackFarlane
Thu, Aug 8, 2019, 4:51pm (UTC -5)

"The Doctor's farewell performance of "Rondine al Nido" in the Qomarian opera house was so moving it brought tears to my eyes, which is about the last thing I was expecting. "

What really got me was when Janeway wiped her tears from her face.
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Yanks
Fri, Aug 9, 2019, 10:03am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: 11:59

Tim-1,

You should feel ashamed.

Slap yourself in the face and get back in front of that TV!! :-)
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HackFarlane
Thu, Aug 8, 2019, 4:51pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Virtuoso

Clearly this episode wasn't meant to be taken too seriously. It was fun to see The Doctor's smugroutines on overdrive and Robert Picardo really sold it--he was wonderful to watch.

The Doctor's farewell performance of "Rondine al Nido" in the Qomarian opera house was so moving it brought tears to my eyes, which is about the last thing I was expecting. And that look on his face when his replacement started singing Tincoo's obnoxious composition was hysterical and a little heartbreaking too.

To echo a few comments above... I think the awkward, overbearing line delivery by Kamala Lopez-Dawson (Tincoo) and the other actors playing Qomarians was probably intentional. It wasn't "bad acting" so much as trying to make these characters appropriately ridiculous (much like the Pakleds in the STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION episode "Samaritan Snare"). It fit the story.

Not bad at all.
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