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Jonathan Baron
Mon, Jun 10, 2013, 11:18pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S4: The Raven

I thought Bomar was an oblique reference to Bowmar, the manufacturer of the first handheld calculator. Well...at least their tech level was similar.
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Jonathan
Fri, Mar 8, 2013, 4:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: One Little Ship

Enjoyed the episode, and I like the idea of a Gamma vs. Alpha conflict, but there was absolutely no subtlety to the execution. They really bashed us over the head with it.
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Jonathan
Thu, Feb 28, 2013, 11:03pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Apocalypse Rising

I enjoyed the little scene between Kira and Bashir, where she blames him for being pregnant. Hahaha...
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Jonathan
Mon, Mar 21, 2011, 2:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S3: Impulse

Vulcan Zombies... only in the expanse. Great episode for watching late at night. I jumped quite a few times haha.
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Jonathan
Tue, Mar 15, 2011, 8:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: The Seventh

All these comments regarding plot implausability, and disbelief. Come on, we just had a Vulcan break down of a main character and one of the first major ones for T'pol. The acting was superb, and that alone made the show enjoyable.
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Jonathan
Mon, Mar 14, 2011, 3:05am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Carbon Creek

I'm glad that I read other user comments before taking Jammer's star reviews at face value. I found this episode to be one of the more delightful and interesting stories so far. Sure, it isn't really related to their voyage, and that may make some think this is a waste of time with a kind of gimmicky scenario with nothing happening.

However, I found Jolene Blalock's acting to nicely portray "Vulcan compassion", kind of like what T'pol's own current personality is like. Furthermore, I really liked the idea of 3 vulcans adapting to the 1950s.
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Jonathan
Sun, Mar 13, 2011, 6:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S1: Shadows of P'Jem

I liked this episode. I viewed it purely as a character building episode between the captain and T'pol and didn't expect anything more. What impacted me the most is when the doctor told T'pol that this is not the first time a vulcan had been put on a ship with humans, but this is the first time a vulcan is actually considered part of the crew. Consider it a milestone. A bridge connecting the two species. Sure, the episode premise, rescue mission, Cordon itself was a bit vague and unexplored, but I find the character building of T'pol to be very satisfying.
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Jonathan
Sat, Apr 17, 2010, 3:56am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

The reset button is a given the first moment you see Jake age. How else can Star Trek series continue? The most important thing is that this episode was a character exposition that explores Jake's personality and Sisko's influence through a What If situation. Given that Jake is without his father, what is he like. What will happen without Sisko in the grand scheme of things? (Klingons, Cardassians, etc). Overall, this episode had a few flaws including my doubts about this random young aspiring writer appearing out of nowhere, but in a sense her naivety played on Sisko's own suggestion to his son: to be a writer, you have to experience the world.
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Jonathan
Mon, Apr 12, 2010, 9:34pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Explorers

@Chris, at the beginning of the episode, Sisko just came back from a library opening with the greatest collection of ancient Bejoran stuff. So, they didn't know about it.
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Jonathan
Sat, Mar 6, 2010, 10:40am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Gravity

I must agree with Jasper - I thought the boy looked very like Tuvok and was convincing as his younger version. Of course it was obvious that he must be a young Tuvok right from the start (apart from the looks, how many black Vulcans do you ever see?) but it was interesting to see *such* an emotional young Tuvok. I wasn't sure about the Vulcan Grand Master though - he didn't seem very Vulcan-like - almost emotional in his delivery! Perhaps the character is deliberately like that to engage with off-message young Vulcans like Tuvok. The real problem here, though, was that we didn't really see anything of the training that transformed him from emotional Tuvok at the start into calm Tuvok at the end. We should have found out a bit about how that transformation came about, but I didn't feel that the scenes we had were enormously enlightening.
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Jonathan
Sun, Nov 29, 2009, 6:21am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Innocence

I must agree with the other comment there. I thought this was an excellent episode - partly because of the clever and interesting ending, and partly because the standard trope of xenophobic aliens is made a little more interesting (these aliens are actually given reasons for being xenophobic, and despite their xenophobia don't just say "Leave this sector now" and start shooting like most of the others). But the main reason for liking this episode is the insight it gives us into Tuvok, partly through really good writing and partly through Tim Russ' barnstorming performance.

See, on paper Tuvok is a very two-dimensional character. He's a Vulcan, he doesn't have emotions, he's logical. He doesn't even have the interesting twist that Spock did of being half-human. But this episode shows why he's interesting nevertheless. Tuvok's description of what love means to him, of how he misses his children, of how Vulcans seek to control their emotions rather than lack them altogether - all combine to give him a lot of depth and make him a very sympathetic character. The writing of these scenes struck me as very good, conveying much in a few lines, and Russ inhabits the character so perfectly that he really conveys his personality. And, yes, the idea of the Vulcan having to babysit very non-Vulcan kids is a bit cutesy, but I thought it worked.

As I recall, in later series Tuvok gets very under-used and spends most episodes doing nothing but give damage reports. That's a shame since, as this episode shows, he has a lot more depth than you might expect.
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Jonathan
Thu, Nov 26, 2009, 2:30pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Deadlock

I enjoyed this a lot (after the opening scene featuring Neelix in a Silly Hat, which didn't bode well) and I thought that the frenetic terrible stuff happening in the first part (culminating in Tuvok's endless damage list) was superb. That's the sort of thing we should have seen more of. Of course as soon as Harry disappeared into space we knew that none of this was "real", since we know that's not really going to have happened. But I liked the way the episode surprised us. It turned out that all that stuff *did* really happen! It just didn't have any consequences.

The most genius part was the arrival of the Bad Guys. Until then I had assumed that the damaged Voyager would be destroyed or otherwise dealt with and the undamaged Voyager would survive and be perfectly fine. That seemed the obvious way to negate any consequences coming from all that chaos. The fact that the Bad Guys landed in the *undamaged* Voyager and started killing everyone was surprising and excellent, as was the consequence that it was *that* Voyager that was destroyed, and the other survived. Very good stuff.

As for the problems of "splitting" the crew, and whether any of them were identical with the originals, that is the sort of problem that lies at the heart of the philosophical discussion of personal identity. Suffice to say that many philosophers would say that, while the two Voyagers co-existed, each crew might have had equal claim to be identical to the originals, and it is possible either that they both were (which raises severe problems) or that neither was (which also raises problems). However, after the destruction of one lot, there seems no reason to say that the surviving crew isn't identical to the originals. Which is weird, but that's personal identity for you.
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Jonathan
Sat, Oct 31, 2009, 2:02am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S3: Similitude

Before Voyager, Star Trek was somewhat grounded in scientific fact. I don't mind that they have taken liberties with the science; that's part of science fiction. Good science fiction doesn't require strict scientific accuracy. But when the science and the depicted reality becomes farther away from even "soft" science fiction standards, it morphs into fantasy (such as the later years of Voyager), where it seems that truly nothing is impossible. The problem isn't so much that anything is possible, but that it is very difficult to say what is impossible/what cannot be done. My favorite episodes are about the exploration of scientific possibilities. When science is blatantly violated, then it becomes silly, and hardly worth watching, because Star Trek sucks at character development.

Contrast Star Trek with Heroes. Heroes is complete fantasy and cannot be considered science fiction at all. It's watchable because it has decent character development. Never mind that I have to turn off half my brain when I watch it.
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Jonathan
Mon, Aug 31, 2009, 9:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Let He Who Is Without Sin...

I liked this episode. I like silly episodes every once in a while. I'm in the minority here, but I'd watch this episode again just to see Leeta play with the two statues on Bashir's lap. Hilarious.
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Jonathan
Wed, Feb 4, 2009, 7:32pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Q2

What happened to Q Jr's "technology" trick that opened a rift directly to such-and-such a place? Why couldn't Voyager use the logs from the Delta Flyer to do the same thing and take themselves home? Why, further, does this omnipotent, lazy Q know more about their technology than they do even when he "won't stoop to use it" and doesn't seem to have any other relevant knowledge?
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Jonathan
Mon, Jan 26, 2009, 10:04am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Ashes to Ashes

Did anyone else think it a bit strange that Ensign Kim has just lost his primary love interest, then asks a little girl to do the same activity with which he had just asked his love interest to do as a date? Modifying the holodeck...not inherently romantic, but in context, it really seemed creepy to me. Anyone else get that?
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Jonathan
Sun, Sep 7, 2008, 2:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S2: Tuvix

I agree with what's been said here about too little time being spent on the Tuvix dilemma here to make the show worthwhile to watch.

However, there's something I think everyone's missing.

Voyager, and for that matter, all of Trek, isn't just about a wagon train to the stars. It's about hiding relevant and controversial issues under enough pretense of fiction to make them "okay" to talk about in the public square. It's about dealing with life, death, spirituality, racism, war, and any issue you can think of. I agree that the cheap ending cheapens the episode, and makes it barely tolerable. But I think that, rather than dealing *more* with the Tuvix-separation dilemma, it should have dealt with it *less*. At the beginning of the show, separating Tuvix was a non-issue. Why did it have to become an issue at all? They could have had Tuvix ask the question, and realize that separation was the only logical thing, and accept it, and all ends well, while having even more time to deal with issues that people really deal with -- let's face it, bizarre transporter merges aren't something you deal with every day.

In summary, I think they took what could have been a great episode, pondering loss of friends while having a great character to laugh at it with, and turned it into an execution scene.
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Jonathan
Tue, Apr 15, 2008, 12:16pm (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: He That Believeth in Me

Thanks for the follow-up Misterd, this is obviously a fact I looked over or forgot about since it has been so long since seeing a new episode. That help clears up a lot.
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Jonathan
Mon, Apr 14, 2008, 6:32pm (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S4: He That Believeth in Me

I found it, like you, to be a good episode overall. The cult of female Baltar worshippers is not very well developed yet, but like so much on this show, I'm willing to give it time. I am curious as to why they are on Galatica. This isn't the Enterprise, there aren't familes on board unless they are families of officers as far as I know. So, are these officers, or stowaways, and with all of the security checks and what not, how would they stay on there undetected? The President has to get permission before she boards, as we have seen in the past.

The Kara plot line didn't interest me a whole lot, and while I was saddened by a main character's death, I thought it was fitting and well done, and maybe she should have stayed dead. Starbuck's story arcs were getting old and repetitive, and maybe they will prove me wrong here, but unless she is a cylon, it's a little annoying to me that she was even brought back. I guess we will have to see. I think for the time being, your rating of this installment is just.
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Jonathan
Wed, Jan 30, 2008, 1:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S3: Similitude

In my opinion, this is the worst episode of Enterprise thus far. It's an examination of the morally challenging issue of organ harvesting from clones. But I can't get past the extremely ludicrous use of science in this episode. Memories and DNA have basically nothing to do with each other. And it's fantasy to think that Sim could learn to have a simple conversation in a couple days, let alone work in engineering.

And sickbay is turning into a representation of the Voyager universe - where very little is seemingly impossible. And T'Pol kissing Sim at the end - how laughable!

Yeah, sometimes you have poor episodes where the writers essentially failed and didn't think hard enough. I'd rather have that, than a very poor application of science. Too often, Star Trek becomes more fantasy than science fiction.
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