Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Voyager

"Friendship One"

**1/2

Air date: 4/25/2001
Written by Michael Taylor & Bryan Fuller
Directed by Mike Vejar

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"They're not so bad once you get to know them. When I first met them I thought they were arrogant, self-righteous." — Neelix on humans

In brief: A most middling affair.

There are good things about "Friendship One," which is very insistent on its desire to say something and mean something and exhibit a lot of classic Trekkian thought. But the net result isn't much to speak of, its central hostage plot is on autopilot, and there are some deeply flawed arguments roaming around in the story. I didn't dislike this episode, but I didn't much like it either; it's one of those shows that's sometimes respectful but largely unmoving.

And poor Lt. Joe "Red Shirt" Carey (Josh Clark). He's shot dead before it's all over here. There were so many years where this guy was relegated to the off-screen sidelines that many viewers assumed he'd simply died (most common was to erroneously recall him as being eaten in "Basics, Part II" — but, no, that was Ensign Hogan). Now Carey gets his true farewell appearance less than a month from the end of the series. I guess his number had to be up one of these days, turning out to be later rather than sooner.

The premise for "Friendship One" might've been more interesting had it been more in the vein of TNG's "First Contact" (the fifth-season episode, not the movie), which was about how humans make contact with an alien civilization. But since that episode has already been done, we instead have first contact as a warning of the dangers of misused technology.

Friendship 1 was a human probe sent in the late 21st century, shortly after warp travel became a reality and humans realized they were not alone in the universe. It was intended to share knowledge with any other-worldly society that might comprehend its message. Starfleet, now having regular contact with Voyager, sends Janeway and her crew on an assignment to try to retrieve the probe, which had last been tracked over a century ago to somewhere in the Delta Quadrant ... not far, coincidentally (yeah, yeah), from Voyager's current position. Retrieving it would be a great historical find.

Voyager tracks the probe to a devastated world polluted with toxic antimatter radiation. A Delta Flyer away team (including Joe "Dead Meat" Carey) finds the probe's remnants, but is surprised by the descendants of those who survived the antimatter catastrophe that left the planet poisoned a century and a half earlier. In short, Friendship 1 had indeed accomplished its goal of contacting alien life, but the aliens virtually destroyed themselves when they tried using the new information available to them.

Plot Machinations 101 decrees that these aliens must instantly take the away team hostage, which they do. Their leader is Verin (Ken Land), who intends to hold the away team responsible for the sins of the generations-ago humans who sent this probe in the first place. I don't agree with his argument, which is that it's humanity's fault for unleashing dangerous technology upon a less advanced society. (It wasn't even war that destroyed this society; it was more of a Chernobyl-like accident, the blame of which, I submit, should be placed more on the people experimenting with the dangerous technology than the people who gave them access to it, undoubtedly with big WARNING signs attached.) Even more dubious is the notion that these people think it was planned this way as an invasion tactic, which makes even less sense to me than it does to Janeway. But the episode, strangely, often seems to hitch its wagon to Verin's cause.

I agree even less with Verin's need to extract penance from the Voyager crew. They didn't have anything to do with what happened, and any reasonable person would see that. Verin isn't a reasonable person so much as a tortured soul scarred by his harsh surroundings. This reduces him to the status of your standard villain-like aggressor, and unfortunately makes much of the episode a routine standoff where Verin makes demands and threatens the hostages (Paris, Neelix, and Joe "Worm Food" Carey), while Janeway communicates from orbit her good intentions and desire to arrive at a peaceful resolution.

Tempering the material are some nice scenes. I liked that Neelix tried to appeal to Verin's better nature by talking about his own losses at the hands of destructive technology (the episode invokes continuity by remembering Neelix's world was destroyed by a massive weapon). And there's also value to be found in the scenes where Paris talks with a pregnant woman who has tragically given birth to three stillborn children because of radiation poisoning, and hopes this won't be the fourth.

But Verin's adamant distrust is a little hard to understand and thus seems forced, particularly in the latter passages after his own people have seen Janeway act on her promises of good will. One of these persons is reasonable scientist Otrin (John Prosky), who is cured of the radiation sickness and helps the Voyager crew devise a method to cleanse the planet. Another is the pregnant woman, whose baby is saved and returned to her, just as Paris promises. All this, despite the fact Verin kills Joe "Target Painted On My Chest" Carey in a particularly pointless act of violence.

In the end, "Friendship One" is a reasonable example of the classic Trekkian formula in which the intrepid starship glides in, helps an alien society solve their problems, and then glides out. And like most episodes helmed by director Mike Vejar, it's well paced and skillfully implemented. But along the way are arguments that I don't buy. Janeway's final line is delivered with a quiet, earnest seriousness that screams "Think about me!" But as I thought about it, it only rang false. On exploring, she says, "It can't justify the loss of lives, whether it's millions — or just one." Excuse me?

Once upon a time, Captain James Kirk gave a famous and rousing (if hammy and portentous) speech where he exclaimed, "Risk is our business." Now we have Janeway saying that the cost of sharing the grand ideas of space exploration isn't worth lives, even if it's just one life like Lt. Carey. I find that argument depressing. Exploration takes courageous people and conviction. Of course there will be lives lost along the way. Does that mean we throw in the towel because it's too dangerous? I'm sorry — that last line must've been written by the same sort of people who outlaw games of "tag" on grade-school playgrounds.

Next week: Return of the Shuttle Crash. Guess we won't make it through the season without one of those after all...

Pointless Jammer trailer commentary: The trailer for next week's episode has got to be one of the most useless ever. We know the show isn't about what it says it's about (losing two crew members in a crash), so what is it actually about?

Previous episode: Author, Author
Next episode: Natural Law

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31 comments on this review

SMP0328 - Wed, Jan 9, 2008 - 3:22pm (USA Central)
I agree with your comment about Captain Janeway's ""It can't justify the loss of lives" line. It was an absurd line. Starfleet officers are supposed to be "explorers" and that entails risking there being loss of life. If that line was consistent with the character, Voyager would never have visited any planets. In fact, it would have flown away from the Caretaker's array ASAP, rather than helped the Ocampa against the Kazon.
Christopher Alexander - Fri, Jan 11, 2008 - 5:21pm (USA Central)
This episode (like many of the less successful Star Trek episodes) takes an excellent idea and squanders it. The idea of the probe causing an unintended tragedy is a good one, but it is basically only mentioned, not effectively conveyed to the viewer. Instead it is overwritten with a lame hostage plot, with a villain so inexplicably irrational that we have no sympathy for him, just a desire for Voyager to get things over with and move on.

The manufactured danger at the end (risking the ship to enter the atmosphere and fire magic photon torpedoes) was too tired and trite to have any interest.

Actually, I liked the initial exploration of the planet, before the crew was captured - it was moody and mysterious. But I thought it strange that the crew were so workmanlike and didn't seem to share my curiosity about what happened.

I totally agree about Janeway's end line being absurd.
Paul - Wed, Jul 2, 2008 - 9:29pm (USA Central)
I didn't recognise Lt.Carey from previous episodes, but as soon as that poor bastard hit the planet, he was as good as dead.

I reckon if you survive your first away mission as an "unknown ensign", you should be promoted to captain.
Mudguts - Sun, Oct 5, 2008 - 5:29pm (USA Central)
Well, I’ve seen some pretty self-serving alien species in the Star Trek universe, but this lot really take some beating. A more self-pitying bunch of losers would be difficult to find.
Ok, so they suffered a great tragedy by misusing the technology from the probe but hey guys and gals, take responsibility for your own actions.
Friendship One could just as easily have contained a recipe for apple pie and if they happened to have an apple allergy, would that be our fault too?
Using their twisted logic, if I buy a gas oven and stick my head inside the thing and gas myself to death, my relatives would be quite justified in taking the manufacturers children hostage because their parents gave me the technology to kill myself!
As for the alien leader, well, he appears to have got away with cold blooded murder. At the very least I’d have expected him to be thrown in the brig for the duration of the journey home.
Initially this episode looked to have an intriguing story line, but unfortunately the attitude of the aliens left me with very little sympathy for them or their situation.
Bob - Sat, Feb 14, 2009 - 3:08am (USA Central)
So was the leader jailed for the cold blooded murder of Carey? I presume Janeway demanded that?
EP - Tue, Mar 10, 2009 - 9:55pm (USA Central)
I really liked the aliens' 'Mad Max'-like clothing. I kept waiting for Mel Gibson to jump out of a cave, driving a big truck.

Compared to the way redshirts got killed off in TOS, at least Carey got some nice scenes over the years, plus speaking parts (and his own card in STCCG!).

I don't have a problem with the villain, either. Hate rarely requires a reasonable motive. By that reasoning, Khan is *less interesting* because he doesn't have a legitimate beef with Kirk. To me, Verrin's vengeance is as plausible as any other vengeance written in the history of literature. It's just that the execution is a bit off (there's only 45 minutes in an episode, after all, and most necessarily needs to be devoted to the VOY viewpoint).
Damien - Thu, Apr 2, 2009 - 9:55am (USA Central)
I agree that the core premise was a good one, but the execution was dreadful. What really pulled me out of the episode was the completely pointless and arbitrary execution of Carey. But what made it even worse was that almost no one (at the time) seemed to be particularly bothered or outraged about it. Both the Voyager hostages and crew aboard ship just seemed to carry on as if nothing much happened. You'd think there would be outrage, anger and a general unwillingness to help these people – nope.

At the end, It's like the writers suddenly remembered that someone had died, and decided to play lip service to the event, only to deliver the silly Janeway line that others have already commented on.
BirdMan - Mon, Apr 6, 2009 - 10:44pm (USA Central)
When I was listening to Janeway's "It's not worth one life" speech, I was reminded of another famous speech made on the bridge of the Enterprise...by Q, in 'Q Who.'

"It's not safe out here. It's wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires, both subtle and gross. But it's not for the timid."
Dan L - Sun, Oct 18, 2009 - 6:35pm (USA Central)
I agree with Jammer overall about this episode. While Janeway's "not worth a single life" preposterous closing line is not just its pedestrian, hypocritical stupidity (her entire existence is a walking repudiation of that line), there is something much more wrong about it.

That something is an example of what Jammer and others have accurately described as the fatal twin flaws of Star Trek: total lack of continuity in storytelling, and its (related) cousin of total disregard for character consistency (or for character generally). Regarding flaw #1, how many times has Janeway learned (or more accurately, have the writers preached) the virtues of space exploration even if it means putting lives in danger? I'm reminded of the episode "Random Thoughts." Seven tells Janeway in that episode (the one where the crew explores a planet where violent thought is punished by engrammatic memory purge) that if Janeway's goal is to get home, she is pursuing it in a most efficient manner. Says Seven, "You constantly impose your own obstacles toward achieving that goal by this process of exploration, borne of a desire, you say, to learn more about aliens and increase your knowledge base. Well, if you're going to be inefficient and make a detour to every planet you visit for the sake of learning more about people, maybe you should at least try learning about what their laws are in advance (i.e. because of your failure to learn these laws, B'Elanna's life is now at stake.) Janeway, knowing that her exploring this planet may cost B'Elanna's single life, intones, "We don't explore space because we have to - we do it because we WANT to." An unabashed, ignorant, and evasive declaration extolling the virtues of space exploration. Such delcarations (and attendant acts) were made throughout the show, ad nauseum, in the seven years leading up to this episode and in the few thereafter. Again, the lessons of those episodes - "space exploration is good" (see, e.g., "One Little Ship" are thrown out the window, good one day only, no one learns anything from them, because, why, in the next self-contained episode, with a similar premise, the writers decide, just for the sake of it, to have a character arbitrarily draw a contradictory conclusion. Total inattentiveness to storytelling consistency. Which, of course, automatically results in (yes, flaw #2, 12:00 high, coming fast) characters behaving internally inconsistently. How can we even say, in a sense, that Janeway's comment is stupid, when the writers haven't even made any attempt to make her a smart individual in the first place by having her act consistently in response to similar situations (or by having her act inconsistently, but explaining the reasons for her doing so) in the first place? To paraphrase Lewis Carroll, if someone has tried to make you believe six implausible things before breakfast, does that person really sound any more ridiculous when, right after breakfast, he or she spouts another implausibility? The "implausibilties" here are having the "characters" say whatever the plot requires of them one day to achieve a desired jerry-rigged effect. The next day, the same character will say the exact opposite if it suits the contrived situation's storytelling purposes.

If there's one line that shows how self-contained episodic storytelling is 1) both properly given a dirty name when the writers don't care about the characters or situations, as well as 2) a device which frees the writers from ever HAVING to care about the characters or situations, Janeway's closing line is it.

Pathetic.

By the way, though, maybe it's just me, but this episode's teaser was one of the most awesome two minutes in Star Trek history. We see the Friendship One probe, accompanied by the strains (and, as ominous Trek-composed music appears, straining),of Vivaldi's "Spring," and within the span of barely over a minute and a half, the tone goes from mysterious to sonorously optimistic, to uncertain, to ominous, all at once, with action, music, and dialogue all working in harmony to convey the changes in tone. Awesome.
Eric - Sun, May 9, 2010 - 7:20pm (USA Central)
I think you guys misunderstood her last line.

When she said it doesn't justify the death of millions, or even just one, she was saying: "Yes, our ancestors were wrong to send that probe, but that doesn't justify him murdering Carrey."
Not: "its unacceptable that anyone die during exploration".
Tony - Thu, May 13, 2010 - 8:49pm (USA Central)
Well, Eric, Janeway sure had me fooled (along with many others who hate that line).
Cloudane - Sun, Apr 10, 2011 - 6:29pm (USA Central)
I share the common thought about the final line. Let's just say Janeway must've been more attached to Carey than we thought and speaking irrationally.

An interesting idea and story, but as mentioned not brilliantly executed. I didn't think it was BAD, but of course it had its fair share of flaws.

I didn't have a lot of sympathy for the lead ghoul (to borrow a term from Fallout) - part of me half hoped Janeway would go into proper badass mode and just say "right let's rescue those hostages by whatever means necessary and get the hell out of here, eff them." But I guess that would've been somewhat unfair on the rest of the ghouls, especially the mother and baby.

The "redshirt", although he was a vaguely known character, was possibly the most blatant use of one I've seen since the series that coined the term (TOS). He might as well have had a neon sign over his head saying "I'm going to die". Ugh - best think of it as a nod to the fans.

I didn't have any major issues about them finding the probe in the first place - at least they had to look for it, based on predicted flight path, instead of just stumbling across it. The fact it survived in the first place is a bit of a stretch, but I'll allow it that.

Good enough - 2.5 is agreeable
Elliott - Wed, May 4, 2011 - 1:41pm (USA Central)
Given the way future Janeway in "Endgame" has become an un-Trekkian cynic, I can see her final line here as a signpost marking that progression (or degression) in her character. The powers that be (or had been) insisted on bottle shows, so the lines must exist in a vaccum, but the writers (in this season especially) did a very clever job of leaving clues to an underlying developing story which culminates in the finale. This, I think, is one of them.
Kristen - Sat, Dec 31, 2011 - 7:45pm (USA Central)
First words out of my mouth as soon as the episode started: :) "Hey, it's that red headed engineering guy we never see!" :( "Oh, I guess he dies this episode."

It went downhill from there.

So, let me just get this straight:
To give these folks technology they weren't ready for 50 years ago was bad. But to give them Borg nanotechnology now is good?

Or did I miss the part where they extract the nanoprobes and explain why to the guy?


Also, anyone else see a problem with this exchange:
Injured Alien Guy: "Nanoprobes, cybernetic
implants. Are others on your crew like you?"
Seven of Nine: "No. I'm unique."

Or did I miss the part where Icheb doesn't have nanoprobes and cybernetic implants?

And how about this one:
Friendship 1 was launched in 2067, says Janeway. Just 4 years after Zephram Cochrane made his warp flight, says Paris. Before Starfleet even existed, says Tuvok. So, um, why does it have the Starfleet insignia and the United Federation of Planets logo on it?

Or did I miss the part where the Federation and Starfleet made logos for themselves 100 years before they existed?


And finally:
Seven gives her nanoprobes to cure the alien guy's advanced radiation exposure. Which is ok by me, since in "Mortal Coil" Neelix was dead for a full 18 hours and was brought back to life with Seven's nanoprobes. Lieutenant Carey has been dead for ten seconds, of an apparent gunshot wound, and there's nothing at all we can do for him?

Or did I miss the part where Seven was all out of nanoprobes after giving a few to the alien who we shouldn't be sharing technology with?


Crap like this just pisses me off. It's one thing to hit the reset button at the end of an episode. But to be inconsistent within the same episode is the worst kind of laziness. And I take it as an insult to the fans. As if we won't notice. We're STAR TREK FANS FOR GOODNESS SAKE! If anyone is gonna notice, it's us.
V - Tue, Feb 14, 2012 - 11:12pm (USA Central)
Let me see, lt. Carey was

1. pushed aside for a chief of engineering
2. thought to be the spy who was colluding with the Kazon
3. Superceded by Lt. Hogan (he used to be B'Elana's right hand)
4. In oblivion for a few years

and now he died a meaningless death and can't be saved by nanoprobes like Neelix was... Damn poor unlucky guy!

Stupidest moment in ST history. I liked him as a character and they could've built him up with lots of angst or built him as a saint. But of course that's too complicated for writers to grasp character arcs.
Jay - Tue, Apr 17, 2012 - 12:05pm (USA Central)
@ Kristin,

re: Carey dying of a simple gunshot...from what we've seen of the transporter, they should have just been ab;e to restore him (and anyone similarly injured) merely by putting them in the transporter and reconstituting them from a previous pattern just before the injury.

Seven wouldn't even be needed.
Markus - Wed, Dec 12, 2012 - 12:13pm (USA Central)
I wondered where Carey had been. He's locked himself up in that room making that stupid starship in a bottle.
Adara - Sat, May 18, 2013 - 2:07pm (USA Central)
Oh no, where is Michael? The reviews aren't the same without him. :(
xaaos - Thu, Jul 4, 2013 - 6:57pm (USA Central)
VOY's biggest fails were killing Hogan and Carey (especially at this point, only 4 episodes before returning back home).

The producers could have done without killing these guys. Carey's death left a bitter taste in me and in the future I will simply skip this episode.

The alien who cold heart shot Carey was a jerk!
Leah - Sun, Jul 21, 2013 - 11:05pm (USA Central)
Agree with most everything that's already been said, especially all of the excellent points Kristen made. And the point of where's the aliens' culpability in all of this was one of the first things that I asked while watching. Yes, the probe introduced potentially destructive tech, but...um...THEY were the ones who made the choice to use it and how. Mudguts' stove analogy is perfect!
ian - Fri, Jul 26, 2013 - 4:07am (USA Central)
The worse thing about this episode is that it is another blatant rip-off of a much better done Space 1999 episode!
Yes you read that right!
First, "Think Tank," totally rips off Space 1999 "The Taybor," and now this Friendship One rips off "Voyagers Return," (ironic nameing there...)
azcats - Fri, Aug 30, 2013 - 11:19am (USA Central)
i too agree. i like the premise of the probe landing on alien planet. but i think it was a weak storyline.

i do wish they used wildman and carey and equinox more often than they did.

i thought killing of Carey wasnt particularly creative.

not one of the strong episodes

1.5 stars
Jo Jo Meastro - Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 11:03am (USA Central)
I thought this episode was pretty good, even though it is one of the more simplistic adventures.

Part of what makes it stand out a little more is the fact that Voyager has been given its first real mission from Star Fleet Headquarters since the pilot. You can feel the uplifting buzz it gives the crew and you can't help but feel it too. It is also what makes the death of Lt. Carey weigh higher and ends the successful Voyager milestone mission on a more sobering, bittersweet note.

I only wish Lt Carey hadn't been hidden away for so long. It made his death have a lot less impact, as well as making it too obvious.

I loved the terrific look and atmosphere of the planet, the rubber puppet baby excluded! As I mentioned before it is a fairly simple tale, often enjoyably so, however it did weaken any moral questions they were trying to make. On the upside, the guest acting was of better quality than in most standard outings; even the villain was decently performed.

I'll go for the slightly lower end of 3 stars!
Kempt - Thu, Nov 7, 2013 - 12:31am (USA Central)
Can anyone explain why the person responsible for speedily locating the probe making this first official mission much shorter saving so much time is still an Ensign?
This kind of performance should've merited an instant promotion to Lieutenant for Harry Kim on its own, let alone other things he's done to deserve it like his part in the rescue of the entire Voyager crew in Workforce.
Jons - Sun, Dec 22, 2013 - 12:23pm (USA Central)
The only reason I liked this episode is that I enjoyed the premise. The idea that no, not every First Contact goes well and sometimes they go disastrously wrong without even knowing it.

But I agree the execution kinda sucked and there were too many improbabilities.
Adam - Thu, Dec 26, 2013 - 7:13pm (USA Central)
Poor Carey! Passed over for chief engineer, had his nose busted up, thought to be in league with the Kazon, and finally dying a senseless death just a few episodes before they got home. He never got to see his wife and family again!
Nick - Thu, Feb 6, 2014 - 9:37am (USA Central)
I agree, the first five minutes were fantastic, compelling set-up, flashback to the probe, ominous planetary exploration in environmental suits....then it all goes into derivative, predictable, story-telling mode. IMO precious back-story and plot development was lost to the 'alien birthing scene', which aside from being very gooey, added little to the overall story, except demonstrate that Paris has matured as a character.

I was OK with killing off a secondary character, though his death proved unnecessary...but then again, most unfortunate deaths are.

I would hope Voyager left a supply of nano-probes and a 'civilization starter-kit' to help those poor people get back on their feet to retake the planet. Perhaps the Federation has a division that will arrive a decade later to assist in the rebuilding. With industrial replicators, it would only take a matter of months to rebuild entire cities.

2.5/5
Chris P - Fri, Feb 14, 2014 - 3:26pm (USA Central)
@Nick

"I would hope Voyager left a supply of nano-probes and a 'civilization starter-kit' to help those poor people get back on their feet to retake the planet."

The idiots would just find a way to turn themselves into Borg.


This episode had a meta aspect to it that struck me as interesting:

1. The natives had a premise they believed but needed to build a story to fill in the plot. They decided that humans were evil and had intent to invade and so they formulated a story around that premise to make it work, even though it makes absolutely no sense.

2. The writers has a premise they'd decided on but needed to built a story to fill in the plot. They decided that Voyager arrives at a planet, its crew gets taken hostage by a Hard Headed Alien, and eventually they help resolve the planet's crisis. Once they laid that framework they seem to have sprinkled in the death of Carey, mutated baby, the usual "we rescued one of the aliens and brought him around to our way of thinking" trope, "our sensors don't work because of the tehnobabble" trope, "our transporters don't work because of the technobabble" trope, "shields down to 18% we won't survive another hit" trope, etc.

The reason these two things are interesting is that they both show a cynical story teller. I wonder if the reason the writers of Voyager were so comfortable with telling these kinds of lazy, cynical stories was because they themselves were usually lazy and cynical (or perhaps were dealing with producers who forced them to play that role). We write what we know.

This episode had one interesting idea and 40 minutes of filler. As usual. 1.5/4 stars.
Amanda - Sun, Feb 23, 2014 - 5:02pm (USA Central)
What if the probe had been in say-back in Krenim space or worse, Vidian Space? I'd be all, "With all due respect Admiral, unless you know it's approx coordinates and it's magically a days travel for us, I am not going to turn this ship around." I'd get a kick out of the reply. :-)

What a waste of Carey. I get speaking characters are more expensive which is why we never see them again, but then don't write any in with interesting personality we want to explore. Like that poor bastard in Basics part II

Hook-Up - Thu, Feb 27, 2014 - 7:23pm (USA Central)
I have to say I really liked this episode ... at least the main idea of it.

Seven is forgetting the existence of Icheb.
That bothered me the most ... it's just such a stupid mistake, how can this survive the writing, filming and cutting process ???

Killing Carey was a good idea .... don't get me wrong - the way they did it was stupid as hell - but losing someone of the crew with a bit of character ... not a a complete nobody is good for the story!
I have to say I am a Joss Whedon fan! ;-)

They did that pretty well with Natasha Yar on TNG!

Of course here, it was made way to obvious!!
After a few seconds you know ... Carey is getting way to much of attention ... he is not coming back!

And than stupidity comes along .... and ruins it completely!
He gets a shot in the heart - nobody needs that anymore, ask Picard - is beamed directly to the Doc and the only thing he can do is holding his tricorder above him and call the captain FIVE SECONDS later to pronounce him dead ???
It would have been so easy to fix this .... shot in the head - brain is gone - nothing you can do!
But maybe this would have been to graphic or hard to display correctly - so they went once more the lacy way!

OK, we had this before ... Nelix once liked a girl from an telepathic planet and she was stabbed by a grandma one time with a knife ... a few seconds later she was dead - no way to bring her back.

I guess you need to have the private health insurance of the main cast!
If you have that you can die several times, be brain-dead, mutate into Sea-Monkeys, have your DNA changed or be combined with another crew-member - the Doc will bring you back like nothing had ever happened!
OK, if you are an alien you only get a holo-lung and have to wait for other aliens to heal you or a Borg to bring you back after the Doc has already put you in a body-bag.
Steinway - Sun, Mar 2, 2014 - 3:34pm (USA Central)
My first thought was, where are these cave-dwellers getting their food? Ah well, I had to ask.

I liked this for a lot of reasons others mentioned (it was one of the few episodes I missed when they first aired), primarily the nice setup. I didn't find the plot too bland. But the one thing that REALLY bothered me was Lt. Carey's death. Poor guy! Of course, I knew from the moment I saw him at the beginning that he was going to die. But the way the aftermath of his death was handled was distasteful. The next scene after Carey was shot, Neelix and Paris are just sitting around like nothing happened. They should have been shaken up or...something! I recognize that there's a certain military "the show must go on, keep your cool" attitude, but this was just silly. I would have thought that at least one of them would have been visibly shaken and upset, even if it was only amongst themselves that this was explored.

And then you have the later scene on Voyager where Paris and Neelix are urging Janeway to help the cave guys! It seemed way out of character for both—there should have been some reference to the emotional impact of Carey being killed. It was totally disjointed and served only to nudge the plot along.

And then the last scene with Janeway ruminating over Carey's death with Chakotay...it was as though the writers said, "well, we've got two and a half minutes left, just enough time for someone to finally acknowledge that Carey died." It was just bizarre.

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