Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Voyager

"Pathfinder"

****

Air date: 12/1/1999
Teleplay by David Zabel and Kenneth Biller
Story by David Zabel
Directed by Mike Vejar

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"Admiral, thank you for seeing me."
"You're scaring my secretary, Mr. Barclay. You have five minutes."

— Barclay and Admiral Paris

Nutshell: A terrific character study and a big moment for the Voyager crew. Very well executed, and well played for its emotional content.

It's nice to break format every once in a while. "Pathfinder" breaks the usual format, places much of the emphasis on guest characters, takes place almost entirely in a setting away from Voyager, features two guest stars from the TNG days ... and does it all without any of it seeming like a calculated ratings stunt. There's real substance here.

Sure, this story will probably resonate more with TNG fans (particularly fans of Lt. Reginald Barclay), but this is still a Voyager story, with a main character whose loneliness might symbolize the loneliness of the Voyager crew. (Or not, seeing as the Voyager crew has rarely been characterized as lonely but instead as a group with implausibly eternal optimism, but, hey, I won't be an ass about it.)

Barclay. I've always liked this guy. Okay, not always (the stories didn't always serve him well), but usually. There's a certain affection you can't help but have for a guy who struggles the way Barclay does. He's sort of a bumbling goof when it comes to talking to other people, kind of like Rom on DS9 ... except likable, believable, and with genuine depth. He's got that klutzy personality, and consistently falls apart when he's trying to explain what's going through his mind. His brain is always racing ahead; verbal conveyance just can't keep up, and his anxiety nearly brings everything else crashing down.

Barclay is the center of a remarkably fresh-feeling premise that's relatively rare for this series: a reversed perspective where the starship Voyager is the object rather than the subject. (A couple other episodes with this characteristic that come to mind are "Living Witness" and "Distant Origin.") Barclay is part of a project called "Pathfinder"—run by a Starfleet Headquarters-based science team devoted to researching methods and technologies that might permit communication with Voyager in the Delta Quadrant. But Barclay has found himself obsessing over the project, obsessing over Voyager itself. He has conjured holodeck re-creations of the crew, and interacts with them, ostensibly because he needs someone to "bounce ideas off of," but really because he has grown attached to these fictional representations of a stranded crew.

With the Enterprise in orbit around Earth, Barclay has contacted Counselor Troi, hoping maybe she can help him. He insists his problem isn't a relapse of his holo-addiction. On more than one occasion he assures other characters, "It's not what you think." Unfortunately, it probably is. It's not exactly a relapse, because the situation is different from the last time: In "Hollow Pursuits" it was about fantasy and escape. Here it's more about need.

On any given day at work, Barclay's inability to convey what he's thinking is a problem. He has devised a complicated procedure that might be able to allow two-way real-time communication with Voyager. It would require dedicated use of an elaborate Federation communications device known as MIDAS (the Mutara Interdimensional Deep Space Transponder Array; you can figure out how that becomes "MIDAS" on your own). The procedure involves long-winded technical explanations, but sometimes Barclay can barely get four words out before he trips over himself.

Barclay's boss, Commander Pete Harkins (Richard McGonagle) isn't hard-headed, but he has followed Barclay's over-exuberant suggestions in the past, ending up with results that were, well, a waste of time. Harkins is skeptical of Barclay's newest plan, which seems way too complicated to work. But Barclay is certain it will work and absolutely dead-set on trying, and he sends himself down a path that vaguely resembles the exhausting, bothersome determination of Rupert Pupkin in The King of Comedy.

"Pathfinders" is easily the best character study since B'Elanna's complex outing in "Barge of the Dead." Most of that can be credited to Dwight Schultz's exceptional performance. Barclay is full of quirks, nervous gestures, and a tendency to suddenly raise his voice when he feels he isn't being listened to. Schultz is able capture these nuances without them coming across as over-performed. The performance creates a sympathetic person when it could've come across merely as a quirky comedy routine.

I felt a great deal of sympathy for Barclay; we can see that deep down what this guy has to say makes sense, but at the same time we recognize every step along the way where he slips up and reveals his obsession and instability, which drags down his own cause. Sometimes it's downright painful to watch Barclay as he tries so hard and so unsuccessfully to express his thoughts, teetering on the edge of desperation. The scene where he first offers his idea to Admiral Owen Paris (Richard Herd) is a perfect example, as he stammers his way through a barely coherent argument, then forgets who he's talking to and presumes he's the only one thinking of the project in human terms. Admiral Paris is, of course, Tom Paris' father, and his interest in the Pathfinder project has a significant personal stake as well.

The only place Barclay feels comfortable is in the holodeck, interacting with the fake Voyager crew. Once inside, he's a truly different person: calm, composed, charismatic. The underlying message here is one of control: Don't we feel more comfortable in situations we can control versus those we can't? The holodeck crew, it would seem, are programmed to be Barclay's friends. He can anticipate the way they will respond to him. They tell him just what he needs to hear just when he needs to hear it. Unfortunately, that's not how the real world works, and it's hard to make any real progress in a fantasy realm.

Barclay doesn't want to admit this is a real problem. But his boss does, and we can understand when Harkins pulls him off the project and bars him from the lab and the holodeck until he seeks counseling. It's interesting to see how Barclay deludes himself into believing that his obsession is all just part of doing his job. Troi has to push him pretty hard before he admits to himself that it runs deeper than simply being overly committed to his work.

Barclay's problem ultimately boils down to the simple concept of loneliness. Leaving the Enterprise to live on Earth hasn't been easy. He hasn't been able to make new friends, because he isn't quite sure how. All he has is his work and that simulated Voyager crew. To him, Voyager is representative of his own emotional isolation. At home he lives with his cat. The cat's name is Neelix. My, what a lonely world. When Barclay finally breaks down and confesses this all to Troi, it's an affecting moment we can understand. The Enterprise served as Barclay's unified friends-and-family. And when you lose that, where do you turn? The world is there, but how do you make yourself fit into it? This is a human story that tackles a believable dilemma. No people mutating into salamanders, just honest emotions.

The plot, which serves the characters well and vice-versa, does a good job of moving along at a good pace without unnecessary distractions. And it's particularly nice that we have a stake in the plot as it unfolds on its own terms. We didn't have much stake in the actual plotting of episodes like "Alice," "Riddles," "Dragon's Teeth," or "Voyager Conspiracy" because they all played out in ways that were more or less inevitable, so the value to be found was strictly within the characters. But "Pathfinder" has a storyline that's about something important to the Voyager crew, so in addition to characters we have a plot that holds its own. I cared very much how this hour would play out.

For Barclay, obsessions do not simply go away. He needs to test his theory. He goes over his commander's head, straight to Admiral Paris, who isn't thrilled with Barclay's persistence but listens to him. When that doesn't result in immediate action, however, Barclay waits until the lab closes and breaks in to carry out the procedure on his own. Barclay ups the stakes and risks his career, but little of that matters to him; contacting Voyager is what matters. One of the most memorable details has to be when Barclay finally sends his message. The agonized expression on his face, a bizarre cross between sheer terror and relief, says it all: "Here I am at the moment I've been waiting for ... but what if it doesn't work?" He looks like he could burst from emotional overload at any moment.

The episode also has a clever "action" sequence when Harkins comes with two security officers to arrest Barclay for breaking into the lab. Barclay, who has obviously planned ahead, still needs to send a second message to Voyager, so he transfers the computer controls and makes a dash into the holodeck, where his resourcefulness and talent for holodeck games give him the advantage. But what I particularly liked was Harkin's approach to ending the game—rigging the simulated Voyager to self-destruct—and the idea of Barclay backing down and ending the program at the last moment rather than seeing the crew blown up. This is an interesting action scene because it also addresses the psychology of the characters.

Of course, since this is a feel-good episode of Trek, Barclay's theory is a remarkable success that reaches the Voyager crew, who are able to establish a live communication and talk back. This saves Barclay in his hour of peril, and supplies the Voyager crew with a moment they've long been waiting for. All of this is quite well-played for its awe factor.

What makes this such a good payoff isn't just the fact that Voyager finally has a live communication with home, but also the use of Paris as a brief but integral part of the equation. He finally gets to hear from his father, who has come to accept his son and put the uneasy past behind him. There's no actual dialog between them—the episode shows some remarkable restraint—but Tom's silent reaction is on the money and his toast later indicates some closure that rings all the way back to the series' beginning.

This ranks as one of the more comfortable feel-good episodes on Voyager's record, featuring a tidy, happy ending. I have nothing against feel-good shows, particularly when done this well. Everything works out for Barclay, who finally seems able to move on with his life. I only hesitate to think where he'd be had the communication effort failed. It's a good bet he'd have been crushed by such a failure, possibly beyond recovery, in addition to his career very likely being over. Things ultimately worked out fabulously, but Barclay's path to personal salvation isn't exactly one I'd recommend.

Some other thoughts:

  • Boy, they sure rebuilt San Francisco and Starfleet Headquarters awfully fast. As much as I liked seeing Earth, it might've been nice to have some indication, however slight, that Starfleet is recovering from the Dominion War. If and when Voyager does get home, I certainly hope we don't get a Federation that's completely healed, as if the final two years of DS9 didn't happen at all. (I know—this isn't relevant to "Pathfinder," but it was something that came to mind.)
  • This week also reminded me how I wouldn't mind seeing the Voyager crew switching to the current, better-looking Starfleet uniforms. Just a thought (albeit not a particularly relevant one).
  • I enjoyed the brief Seven/Neelix exchange about the singing lessons. What I particularly found amusing was Seven's way of insulting Neelix with a statement that would be sarcastic from anyone else (telling him he should perhaps restrict his singing attempts to the shower), except that Seven really means it and delivers it as a 100 percent neutral fact with no intended malice. Hee. (Last week Seven assimilated the Borg implant labeled "Richard Belzer." In addition to turning her into a conspiracy theorist, apparently it also helps her deadpan humor technique.)
  • I also was hoping there might be some mention of Doc's connection to Barclay as evidenced in second season's "Projections." According to that episode, Barclay was on a team that helped test the EMH's original program. That might've also been a nice touch to figure into his obsession. Ah, well. I suppose that might've been cluttering up the story a bit.
  • Of course, I must mention the story's one noticeable plot hole. In predicting Voyager's course, there's no way Starfleet can take into account the fact that since Doc's communication almost two years ago in "Message in a Bottle," Voyager has made several jumps amounting to anywhere from 25,000 to 30,000 light-years ("Night," "Timeless," "Dark Frontier," last week's "Voyager Conspiracy"). Based on Starfleet's prediction (and Barclay's own dialog about Voyager being 60,000 light-years away), the entire effort would be rendered ineffective, methinks. Just once I'd like to see the writers accurately represent the distance remaining in Voyager's journey, which I'm inclined to believe is less than 30,000 light-years at this point.
  • I liked the lighting techniques in Barclay's apartment—the way it went from bright afternoon to sunset to darkness in between the flashback scenes. Not a big surprise, since the director is Mike Vejar, who I'm inclined to call Trek's current best. (In DS9's "The Changing Face of Evil," also directed by Vejar, I was similarly struck by such a technique used to show the sun setting on Bajor in various scenes throughout the episode.)

I've droned on long enough. "Pathfinders" isn't perfect (that one plot hole regarding the distances is a bit of a nag), but it's an episode where I really cared, was really entertained, and really liked the characterization. That's what counts. This is a real keeper, easily among Voyager's best.

Next week: Rerun. "Does Jason Alexander want Seven of Nine for her mind or her body?" Direct quote, people. Further proof that no road is too low for UPN promos. But it made me laugh out loud, so I guess it's not all bad.

Have a safe and happy rest of the millennium. See you in 2000. (And if you say, "The new millennium isn't until 2001," I will vaporize you.)

Previous episode: The Voyager Conspiracy
Next episode: Fair Haven

Season Index

33 comments on this review

TribbleWrangler - Tue, Jan 1, 2008 - 9:32pm (USA Central)
Just watched this episode again, and I am always impressed by Dwight S.'s portrayl of StarFleet's most flawed Genius, the "Brian Wilson of the Federation"
Jakob M. Mokoru - Fri, Feb 1, 2008 - 1:17pm (USA Central)
Really an fantastic episode! Mulgrew did a terrific job in showing her restraint emotions while having first contact with Starfleet command.
Joe M. - Wed, Jun 18, 2008 - 9:53pm (USA Central)
Great episode. Alone worth the price of the season six boxed set DVD's.
Unicron - Wed, Aug 20, 2008 - 1:17am (USA Central)
Interestingly, I'd have rated the ep a bit lower. The premise is good, but I think the execution was lacking. What made Barclay work on TNG is the fact that, despite his neurotic quirks, he's still a brilliant and capable engineer. The writers managed to show that quality as well, even though the quirks were usually the focus of a Barclay story. It gave him depth.

Here I have a hard time thinking that he hasn't indeed relapsed into holoaddiction, and that's in no small part due to the simulations feeling... well, fake. Barclay says that he feels more comfortable with the holograms than his coworkers on the project, but that seems to be because the holocrew is programmed to think he's an indispensable genius. They spend more time complimenting him than they do actually helping him with his work and making his view seem more believable.

I dunno. I just don't think Barclay was handled as well as he should have been, and Troi wasn't really given much to do - it's nice to see Marina again, but she's not a huge component in the story. Some parts of it were way too predictable.
Jso - Fri, Jan 9, 2009 - 7:21pm (USA Central)
One of Voyager's best episodes ever and it has almost nothing to do with Voyager. No surprise there.

Actually I don't mind Voyager, it's had a lot of pretty good episodes, but nothing can top an all Barclay episode. They could have made this a two parter, or hell just make a whole series around him.
Latex Zebra - Mon, Apr 20, 2009 - 6:55am (USA Central)
Wonderful episode.
The thing that nagged me (the distance thing i could let go) was that all is forgotten about Barclay breaking into Starfleet and using their equipment unauthorised, just because he managed to make contact.
Breaking the rules is breaking the rules and it hardly sets good examples for officers if you can do all the above and get away with it. Just because of the end results.

Oh hang on, this is just a TV program isn't it. ;o)
dan - Sun, Jun 21, 2009 - 8:01pm (USA Central)
this one is my favorite episode
Nic - Thu, Oct 1, 2009 - 12:33pm (USA Central)
I disagree. This episode COMPLETELY felt like a ratings ploy from beginning to end, and a rip-off of "Hollow Pusuits" with a Voyager twist. It barely had anything to do with our beloved characters at all. Though I will admit that the final act was very powerful and well-executed stuff. I just wish they could have done it with more focus on the main characters and less focus on the TNG guest-stars-of-the-week.
Barack - Tue, Feb 16, 2010 - 1:01am (USA Central)
I agree with Nic - we've seen all of this before. Nothing new here. I give this episode a D- - it's well-done, but it's just a character name substitution for the earlier holoaddiction stories.
Jay - Sun, Feb 21, 2010 - 11:31am (USA Central)
The story was good, but why Barkley? He lowers the episode at least a star and a hlaf, because I can't stands him. His shy timidity in the real world, here and in the past, has always been grating, but his snarky confident behavior with the holocrew of Voyager was utterly excruciating.
Michael - Thu, Jul 8, 2010 - 4:56pm (USA Central)
Four stars is really pushing it - 3 would be more appropriate - but it IS a good show. Not one for sentimentality, but my eyes swelled when Paris' dad said he missed him - that scene worked very well.

I could have done with much less philosophizing and counseling, and more of the technological facet of it all. This is again an episode that's too much about people (a person) and personalities at the expense of SCIENCE fiction.

Another concern is Commander Harkins. Is humanity going to progress so little in four centuries that we will STILL have pompous, closed-minded morons in high positions of authority?! I would've fired his ass at the end.

Good to see Deanna again. She's still a cutie :)
Jay - Sun, Feb 6, 2011 - 12:17pm (USA Central)
This episode would have been a good excuse for the Voyager crew to switch over to the new uniforms. Surely the replicator pattern could be sent in the data stream.
Cloudane - Fri, Mar 11, 2011 - 6:34pm (USA Central)
Ha, marvelous episode (haven't said that about Voyager for several seasons!)

Having Barclay as the one to finally establish 2-way communication with Voyager is absolutely inspired and it fits in perfectly that he would be the only one obsessed enough to go the extra mile.

I have to admit I also identify with Barclay quite a bit when it comes to having ideas (Not claiming to be a genius, I just mean in certain ways at work) and them being overlooked due to my own poor communication, or not being allowed to chase up something I believe I can achieve for the same kind of reason. You have no idea how frustrating it is and how obsessed you become with getting something done and proving yourself before it's taken away. This was very true to life and captured very well.

Anyway, Neelix the Cat - hahaha

Good to see it mostly play out from Starfleet's side

PLOT DEVELOPMENT on VOYAGER?! :D

For the first time in a long long time (last time would be some point during DS9 maybe) Trek put a lump in my throat. I am of course referring to the moment between Paris and son. Very very moving. BTW, Isn't it time he earned Leiutenant rank back...

Just everything was beautifully executed and even the technobabble was at least acknowledged (Troi: "you've lost me...") :). I'm glad a big moment like this has had so much genuine thought, care and attention put into it. So the Voyager writers were capable of it after all. Bravo.
Kieran - Mon, Apr 4, 2011 - 4:17am (USA Central)
I liked the episode, but was it me or was Admiral Paris just too cuddly? I just couldn't beleive this was the guy who had terrified Paris throughout his childhood.
Iceblink - Wed, Aug 24, 2011 - 3:30am (USA Central)
Very enjoyable ep - but not a four star effort, as it certainly doesn't sit alongside the best of the best in terms of Trekkian masterpieces. It is an engaging, fun and ultimately poignachainring and it's great to see Reg and Deanna again (although I couldn't get over the design of Reg's apartment - it didn't look particularly 24th century at all). The plot is pretty basic and wholly predictable but that didn't diminish my enjoyment of the ep. The gold is in the characterisation and the details
Iceblink - Wed, Aug 24, 2011 - 3:33am (USA Central)
Oops that was meant to read "ultimately poignant change of pace" but got garbled somehow - gotta stop posting from mobile devices :-p
Matt - Sat, Sep 17, 2011 - 10:15pm (USA Central)
So Data's Spot and now Barclay's Neelix, doesn't anyone have a dog in the future?
Tim - Fri, Nov 4, 2011 - 7:59am (USA Central)
Matt don't forget Chester - the cat Miles got from Bilby.
Will - Tue, Nov 15, 2011 - 4:15pm (USA Central)
The one thing that I never understood about the whole wormhole plot element is, what stops Starfleet from creating another wormhole? Even if the star used to create the micro-wormhole was somehow "used up", I doubt that the star is particularly unique (he didn't tell the computer to use a specific star, rather he just said "find a type-so and so star". If the star has a whole type dedicated to it, it's likely common), so what stops the Federation from moving the array to the next available star and opening another wormhole?
Rosario - Wed, Apr 11, 2012 - 2:24pm (USA Central)
4-stars? Praise? This was wretched dog-drivel. Reg isn't an enduringly lovable secondary character. He's an annoying, glad-we-don't-see-him-often tertiary character. I could have sworn this guy was supposed to have developed some rudimentary social skills - I mean, I am watching every single star trek in a row, it's not like I last watching TNG 7 years ago, no, I watched it 7 weeks ago and 7 weeks ago, this guy showed SOME social prowess. But here, now, this guy's foot is always in his mouth. When he started sputtering to the Admiral I threw whatever the hell was in the my hand, that I was toying with to TRY and distract me from this mess and wondering why I was still watching it. And what in the name of science was with that accent he slapped on when he was getting "confident?" I turned off that worthless drivel with Quark cross-dressing after 4 minutes but for some reason I let THIS pile of pig vomit play for all 46 minutes. I give it .5 stars - the scene when they DO make contact is beautifully done. It's just such a shame that I have to go grubbing around in some dirty oyster's shell to find that one tiny pearl.
Jammer - Wed, Apr 11, 2012 - 4:59pm (USA Central)
Wow. Ouch.
Admiral_Ritt - Wed, May 2, 2012 - 12:17pm (USA Central)
Good Episode, even if I can't stand Troi.
Would have liked more Baclay-Holo Voyager crew scenes

As it was it just had too much TNG involvement
3 stars.

As to the uniforms, How the hell can anyone like
the NEW uniforms. There's no real accent on crew
assignment status. All we get is an very ugly and cheap looking undershirt to indicate Command,Science,Support. and everybody's shoulder level color is POWDER BLUE.
This goes against tradition alllll they way back to TOS, and nobody cares?

Voyagers & Generations movie unis are pefect.
Not full body loud color as in Next Gen
Not Powder Blue, w/ meanigless wrist decoration.

The new uniforms were so GENERIC, they had to give
Picard a unique wardrobe to infiltrate the borgified Enterprise E. in First Contact.
Justin - Sun, Jun 3, 2012 - 3:00pm (USA Central)
Fun episode, but 3 questions:

Isn't a singularity supposed to be a black hole, not a wormhole?

Why did Admiral Paris have a picture of cadet Nicholas Locarno on his desk?

Why did The Doctor fail to mention "turned into a spider" as one of Barclay's "variety of maladies"?
Jay - Mon, Jun 4, 2012 - 1:56pm (USA Central)
@ Justin...

indeed so, especially since that particular malady actually carries Barclay's name...
Cureboy - Fri, May 10, 2013 - 8:06am (USA Central)
Just watched this last night. I liked how Barclay had the Maquis in their old outfits. Nice touch. Just a guess he made.

In regards to the distance. Barclay mentioned at one point that the ship was 60,000 light years from Earth. At that point he would have no reason to think otherwise. He wouldn't have known about Dark Frontier and Timeless. Towards the end, he was in panic mode because the message wasn't answered where he thought it would be. He kept trying new coordinates and eventually he found them. I think it was more serendipity
Armored - Mon, Jun 10, 2013 - 2:03am (USA Central)
This is the only episode in the entire series that caused a lump in my throat ( even shed a tear). That happened when Tom's Father said that he was proud of him. Nice conclusion to a mini story arc that started from the beginning of this show.

The distance thing really did piss me off though. It would have taken a hell of alot more "guesses" to find the correct sector of the Delta Quadrant Voyager would have been travelling through at that point in time.
skadoo - Thu, Jul 11, 2013 - 10:58pm (USA Central)
@Matt - you forgot that Janeway has a pregnant dog in Caretaker.
I always hated the Barclay eps in TNG but he wasn't as annoying in this.
Also, the security for starfleet sucks, he removes a panel, diddles with it a few moments and poof he's in?
Jo Jo Meastro - Sun, Jul 28, 2013 - 4:36pm (USA Central)
If last episode was a good example of a routine yet fun story, then this is an example of an top-of-the-draw spectacular all-guns-blazing event.

All I can do is echo the high praise that's already been given and add me to the list of people who were touched emotionally by the final resolution to the wonderfully rich story. It had excitement, freshness, boldness, drama, scale, even a pinch of humour...it had everything basically, which is what I like.

The only thing left to mention is that I love Barclay as a character. I actually relate to him a lot with his anxiety and problems. I felt for him when he was on a low and I was cheering right alongside him when he came out on top. The praise definitely goes to Dwight Schultz, I love his work ever since seeing him in the A Team as a kid!

A Star Trek classic, beautifully done. I'm very very pleased with season 6 so far, as far as I can remember there hasn't been a single episode I've disliked!
Nancy - Mon, Aug 12, 2013 - 1:02am (USA Central)
I was delighted to see Troi again, and appreciated Barclay as well. However, if Barclay grates on you, I can see why you wouldn't like this episode as he dominates it.

I agree that having the old outfits/hairdos was cool, but I did notice some of the plot holes others have pointed out, especially the ship location issue and the doctor not recognizing Barclay.

The whole thing was worth it for the communication scene, though. Very powerful. I just wish Paris had said something. Having Janeway say "He heard you" wasn't as powerful as him saying something as simple as "I miss you too, Dad."

Good episode overall with a killer final act, despite a few problems and slow parts before then.
azcats - Tue, Aug 13, 2013 - 12:57pm (USA Central)
Jammer! I am glad you commented on the scened with Neelix and Seven. It clearly had nothing to do with the episode, but that is what made it so much better. I love when they show daily banter that has nothing to do with the show. the whole scene made me laugh!

also, i was riveted. I couldnt wait to see how the final act unfolded. it had me caring about voyager and Barclay.

I think Barclay was the perfect person for this episode. 1. you can totally picture him getting obsessed. 2. you knew he worked in developing the DOC so it wasnt a long shot that he would be involved..

i loved the scene with Admiral Paris talking to Janeway.

but most of all, i love how they circled back around to Tom Paris inducting Barclay as an honorary member. that was a pretty cool idea by the writers.

easily a 4 STAR episode!
Lt. Yarko - Mon, Aug 26, 2013 - 10:47am (USA Central)
Eh. Not that great. I would think that Barclay should have made some progress by now. He is still a mess. Poor guy. Too bad his condition can't be cured by waving one of McCoy's thingies over his head. I mean people who have been turned into lizards can have their DNA resequenced to turn them back into exactly what they were before (hair style included), but Barclay can't have his brain sequenced to make him less of a basket case.

Oh, and talk about your hard-headed bad guys. The dude in charge of the project could have been a little less of an a-hole and given Barclay's plan at least a look-over. I mean, even Paris' dad was willing to check out his work. "Stun him if you have to!" Absurd. These are supposed to be evolved adults. And, that damned holodeck. You just can't get access to the power grid outside of the holodeck controls which can be encrypted to shut the damned things off.

And, yeah, nice security, starfleet.
Tom - Tue, Sep 3, 2013 - 4:51am (USA Central)
Man, these reviews are old. It's sometimes weird when he references the "coming" millennium. Jammer, are you still around?
Tricia - Mon, Jan 20, 2014 - 4:33am (USA Central)
The distance thing irritates me about this episode. They just jumped 5000 light years in the previous episode - how would Barclay know where to send the message? And Barclay is a terrible character. I can't believe they brought him back. Love the TNG crossover, but ANYONE would have been better than him!

I actually didn't mind the episode, and I liked that they made contact again - but jeez, Barclay's annoying.

Submit a comment

Above, type the last name of the captain on Star Trek: TNG
Notify me about new comments on this page
Hide my e-mail on my post

Season Index

Copyright © 1994-2014, Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution of any review or article on this site is prohibited. Star Trek (in all its myriad forms), Battlestar Galactica, and Gene Roddenberry's Andromeda are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc., NBC Universal, and Tribune Entertainment, respectively. This site is in no way affiliated with or authorized by any of those companies. | Copyright & Disclaimer