Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Voyager

"One Small Step"

***1/2

Air date: 11/17/1999
Teleplay by Mike Wollaeger & Jessica Scott and Bryan Fuller & Michael Taylor
Story by Mike Wollaeger & Jessica Scott
Directed by Robert Picardo

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"What I've seen proves we were right to come out here."

— Lt. John Kelley, Ares IV mission, 2032

Nutshell: The message might be as subtle as a sledgehammer, but it's also sincere and ultimately quite poignant.

There are moments during "One Small Step" when you can almost hear the writers screaming in the background: "Look! See? This is what Star Trek is about!" Yes, we understand, loud and clear.

Okay, so subtlety isn't this episode's strong suit. You can tell the people who made it were trying very hard for it to add up to something worthwhile. The under-the-surface projected self-aware sentimentality is abundantly evident.

Big deal. "One Small Step" is still a quality hour of Trek with some poignant, emotional moments and a solid story. It might not exhibit the most original themes ever scribed, but so what? It's sincere and well presented. I liked it. It says something. It means something. It shows evidence of knowing what Star Trek is about.

After last week's "Dragon's Teeth," which had a plot that obliviously steamrollered right over moral issues without any regard for (or awareness of) them, this episode is refreshing in that it stops to consider what it's about. It has dialog instead of mindless action, and it's actually about exploration.

In many ways, "One Small Step" is an episode that argues (from a thinly guised 20th century perspective) the necessity of a continued, expanding space program. These days, manned space missions seem to be covering well-traveled ground. Sure, the scientific analysis and technological advances are beneficial, but the question, I think, is when the next "great voyage" into space will begin. The moon missions were a towering achievement requiring great risk and human and financial expense. The new question: When will we go to Mars?

"One Small Step" is not of the same dramatic caliber as, say, Ron Howard's Apollo 13, but as an episode of Voyager it does some interesting things. It frames its questions within the terms of the usual Voyager plot formula. The formula itself isn't captivating per se (space anomalies, crew members in jeopardy, etc.), but the addition of the human questions of exploration makes all the difference in the world. Lesson of the week: Routine anomalies and jeopardy premises can work just fine when they're part of a bigger purpose.

October 19, 2032: Ares IV, one of NASA's early manned missions to Mars, is a partial success. Astronauts have landed on the surface while a single pilot, Lt. John Kelley (Phil Morris, whose last Trek appearance was in DS9's "Rocks and Shoals," where he portrayed the most understandable Jem'Hadar soldier of all time) maintains orbit. Suddenly a bizarre anomaly appears out of nowhere and swallows the craft. ("Mankind's first encounter with a spatial anomaly," Tuvok notes upon reviewing the history. It was obviously not to be the last.) The 21st century would never hear from Kelley again and would presume him dead. Weeks later, an emergency mission would rescue the marooned astronauts.

Three centuries later, Voyager happens upon the same anomaly, which emerges from subspace unexpectedly. It's an exceptionally rare phenomenon, known as a "graviton ellipse," which travels through subspace and emerges periodically (every few centuries). It's well worth studying, so the history research begins: How old is this phenomenon, and is it the same anomaly that swallowed the Mars orbiter?

Well, of course it's the same anomaly, otherwise we wouldn't be able to so literally join 300-year-old history with the current storyline. Naturally, I must point out that the chances of Voyager being in the right time and place to encounter this anomaly—the very same anomaly that swallowed a human-built spacecraft 300 years earlier halfway across the galaxy—has probably got to be approximately several quintillion to one. But no matter—this is fiction and I'm willing to suspend my disbelief given the strength of the underlying sentiments.

From a character standpoint, the show is mainly about Seven and Chakotay, with some Janeway sentiments thrown in for good measure. Chakotay is revealed as the story's honorary paleontologist, claiming such study was his first passion before "responsibility" forced him into Starfleet and the Maquis. With Paris and Seven comprising his away team, Chakotay volunteers to lead a Delta Flyer mission into the ellipse in hopes of retrieving the remains of the Mars orbiter (which, by the way, is not suspended in time; it's been sitting for three centuries and that means three centuries). While we haven't seen this aspect of Chakotay taken so far in the past, it does strike me as reasonable; he's a guy who has shown interest in legends and history.

Seven provides the counterpoint to Chakotay's earnest interest in the past, offering up such notions as "history is irrelevant." She doesn't understand why the crew would take on a dangerous mission for what she perceives as purely sentimental reasons. When she questions the sentiment, Janeway encourages Seven to volunteer for the salvage mission. After all, she might learn something from the experience.

I wonder if Seven was maybe written a little too strongly in the opposing position. Given all she knows, the notion of her believing "history is irrelevant" seems a little extreme, even for Seven. And given all she has learned in the past, it seemed a little bit like the writers turned back the clock somewhat and wrote Seven for the benefit of those who haven't been watching the past two years. It wasn't exactly out of character, but let's just say that if you've never seen Voyager before, you'll still instantly understand that Seven is the newest character who will be learning all the human lessons here.

So the Delta Flyer enters the graviton ellipse to search for Kelley's spacecraft. When they find it, it's an awe-filled moment where we see characters coming face to face with history, uncovering it with their own eyes. That's a big part of "One Small Step's" appeal; it's about the thrill of exploration and discovery. One of this series' biggest shortcomings is that it usually lacks that thrill, because what we find in the Delta Quadrant is rarely new or unique. But, for once, here's a spatial anomaly that isn't just something that will threaten the ship. It's like a floating galactic museum, filled with relics that are literally billions of years old. The ellipse itself is one of the oldest things a starship has ever encountered, perhaps not much younger than the universe itself. Chakotay says he could spend the rest of his life studying it. I believe him.

This story, of course, would not be complete without something in the mission going very wrong. What's nice is that what goes wrong can be attributed to human judgment error rather than arbitrary contrivance. The tech aspects of the plot, for once, don't impede the drama. The way the ellipse is attracted to objects that emit electromagnetic energy seems believable, and the script doesn't resort to technobabble excess. There's a plausible change in the ellipse's course, which sets in motion the bigger problem: an imminent collision with an asteroid that will cause severe turbulence in the ellipse that could damage the Flyer. This leads to the moment of human error, where Chakotay refuses to leave the ellipse without bringing the Mars spacecraft in tow, which slows them down enough that the likelihood of escape is decreased. It's a close call that Chakotay loses, and as a result the Flyer is damaged so severely as to prevent escape from the ellipse altogether, putting the away team in danger.

I particularly enjoyed the resulting Chakotay/Seven interaction. It's a character pair-up that we don't often see, and the dynamic proves to be a good one. Chakotay made a mistake, and Seven lets him have it in a scene where she's clearly angry at the commander for his following a sentimental "obsession." Seven's anger is understandable; she didn't want to be on this mission in the first place, let alone die for it. But Seven is overlooking the greater importance of the mission, and one can hardly blame Chakotay for his calculated risk. Given the importance of the discovery, you don't just give up on something like this when it's just within your clutches. I'd say Chakotay barely even had a choice. "Obsession" is too a strong word. He wanted to preserve a piece of history, almost had it, but lost on the roll of the dice.

So next it becomes a race against the clock: The Delta Flyer team must figure out how to repair the engines before the ellipse returns to subspace while they're still trapped inside. The only viable option is to beam over and salvage a component from the Mars orbiter and adapt it for use in the Flyer. With Chakotay injured and Paris needed as the expert pilot, the retrieval mission falls upon Seven.

Ultimately, the hardware aspects of the plot really aren't that important (although, because of the character interaction these scenes are more involving than a plot of this type usually is). What's important is how this all fits in with Lt. Kelley's 2032 mission. Kelley was not killed upon impact as was believed at the time. While Seven is working to retrieve the module, she plays Kelley's logs, which include recordings from after he entered the ellipse. (One wonders if so much of the equipment on board the orbiter would still work so well after being frozen for 300 years, but I won't be a stickler.)

Kelley's experience in the orbiter spanned several days. He explored the phenomenon that swallowed him, and through that exploration he came upon perhaps some of the biggest possible discoveries of the time, including proof of other intelligent life in the universe. Ironically, these discoveries wouldn't see the light of day for another 300 years. It became clear to Kelley he would not be able to escape the ellipse, but I particularly liked the writers' notion that he didn't consider the mission a failure—that "What I've seen proves we were right to come out here."

Watching Seven's gradual change in attitude as she views Kelley's logs reveals an uplifting poignancy, as if for the first time she understands the concept of a true explorer and hero. (And I liked that Jeri Ryan conveyed this change in attitude without a single line of dialog.) People like Kelley and the other Mars landers paved the way for greater things by forging ahead through the uncertain at great risk.

Even given the technology advances since the moon missions, it's hard to imagine that a manned mission to Mars could be anything short of extremely difficult and risky. Just as Apollo 13 showed us, there are any number of things that could go wrong with technology and machinery—which might be reliable but is definitely not infallible—and one small problem can start the domino effect of disaster. In the Star Trek universe, we're shown interstellar space travel as an aspect of life that's nearly as routine as, say, driving a car is today. If there's one thing "One Small Step" seems to realize, as Paris notes in one early scene, it's that space travel in the 20th and 21st centuries was anything but routine. The dangers were real and the unknowns were real. Even if a spatial anomaly didn't swallow you up, you were still alone, at the mercy of your technology. The space travelers of the 24th century have it easy by comparison.

There is no doubt "One Small Step" has a reverence for the space program and the astronauts who brave it. The message isn't subtle. But it is fairly inspiring. In Trek we take space travel for granted, and, especially with Voyager and its magical indestructibility, it has become easy to get jaded even though we're supposedly exploring the dangerous vastness of the other side of the galaxy. This is an episode that breaks free and explores the idea of what it means to be traveling that "final frontier" with no expectations. By turning back the clock and exploring Kelley's mission, we and the Voyager crew are able to make first-time discoveries of things that this fictional universe has long since accepted as routine. That's a sentiment I find well worth an hour.

Next week: The REAL reason Voyager is in the Delta Quadrant. (Paging Chris Carter...)

Previous episode: Dragon's Teeth
Next episode: The Voyager Conspiracy

Season Index

32 comments on this review

mlk - Tue, Jan 22, 2008 - 9:02pm (USA Central)
A pretty good episode but I think they should have kept the body and his uniform etc and deliver to the next of kin back on Earth, and Seven should have taken his picture with her
Nick - Mon, Mar 30, 2009 - 10:03am (USA Central)
This is perhaps a petty quibble but the Doctor talks about his first away mission to a planet and when Seven asks for clarification the Doctor quickly says "It was before you were aboard." That seems a little odd given that he couldn't go anywhere without the mobile emitter that was only created after Seven joined the series.
Ian Whitcombe - Mon, Mar 30, 2009 - 10:42am (USA Central)
The mobile emitter was introduced in "Future's End, Pt. II", almost a full season before Seven was introduced.
Damien - Fri, Apr 10, 2009 - 7:54am (USA Central)
Yes, it was a pretty good ep. I too thought it was rather pointless retrieving the body only to shoot it into space again. They should have kept it in cold storage until they returned to Earth.

But I cannot let a real zinger go by without comment. The anomaly zeros in on electromagnetic fields, so what do they come up with to explain the source of EM causing the anomaly to change course? Dark matter! Yep, the stuff that got its name because it doesn't interact with EM fields at all! It emits ZERO radiation - which is what makes it dark! Why on earth did they come up with that when they ran through some perfectly good sources of EM, like pulsars?
Ken Egervari - Wed, Dec 9, 2009 - 3:58am (USA Central)
Enjoyed this one a lot. Like the review noted, the only problem I have with it is the insane probability of discovering the ellipse in the first place. Still, there are so many really good moments, and the whole thing holds together. Here's an episode that really knows what it's trying to say, and it goes for it in every scene. The logs were especially well done. I cut up voyager a lot on these comments... but this one of the episodes I thoroughly enjoyed, despite the fact that it has no point with the series goals or purpose (if there is actually a purpose at all).
Michael - Thu, Jul 8, 2010 - 11:32am (USA Central)
This is an O.K. episode but not way is it 3.5 stars. 2.5, more like.

A third of the show was wasted on convincing Seven that she was somehow deficient for not ascribing value to historical excavation/exploration. I don't know why they insist on imbuing her with every single human value and principle, and can't just let her be. I don't want another Janeway/Acoushla Moya/Harry "Can't-Get-A-Lock" Kim/Paris clone. And then the corny ending... - spare me.

Next, the usual spiel of "we only have X minutes before the whole endeavor goes irretrievably south." (And of course, they make it by the skin of their teeth.)

Acoushla Moya's stubbornness that nearly cost three senior crew members' lives as well as the Delta Flier, and which does not get punished in any way. (I'd at the very least demote him or suspend him for six months for such insubordination.)

Lastly, several minutes of unnecessary, static monolog by Lt. Kelley.

Sorry but this episode was just... - average.
navamske - Wed, Oct 6, 2010 - 7:21am (USA Central)
When you watch an episode like this one, with Seven's open contemptuousness and insubordination -- completely devoid of any "sexual tension" like that between, say, Sam and Diane on "Cheers" -- it's difficult to believe that Chuckles could fall in love with her and then go completely to pieces after she croaks three years later.
Fabian - Sun, Jan 23, 2011 - 9:34pm (USA Central)
This was a great, sincere and nicely done episode about the rare 'graviton ellipse' phenomena and how it almost derailed the Mars program for a while there and took out the Ares IV craft. The real point of this episode was how the doomed astronaut John Kelley's logs caused Seven to realise her humanity and not contemptuously dismiss the Chakotay mission as a pointless endeavour. Its not easy to do this when you've been a Borg drone since you were a child. She had no sense of human history at all and previously looked at the Ares craft as just a piece of obsolete human technology.
Jay - Fri, Jan 28, 2011 - 12:07pm (USA Central)
I'm with Michael...I didn't find this episode very interesting or impressive.
Kieran - Fri, Mar 25, 2011 - 7:00am (USA Central)
Chakotay seemed really out of character in this one. In fact, with his disobeying orders and living out childhood obsessions he seemed to be acting far more like Paris. Which makes me think this was going to be a Paris episode and was re-written as a Chakotay vehicle because they hadn't had one in a while.

I also didn't like how Seven was reprimanded by the others as being inhuman for having no interest in history. There's plenty of people who couldn't give a rat's ass about history. I guess such behaviour just doesn't fit with the Starfleet mould where everyone seems to have heroes from the past for some reason.
Fido - Fri, Mar 25, 2011 - 1:54pm (USA Central)
There were things about this episode that ruined the emersion for me. I was very aware I was watching an acted-out plot. Didn't enjoy this one.
Iceblink - Tue, Aug 23, 2011 - 3:31am (USA Central)
An Ok episode, but it didn't do as much for me as it did for Jammer and others. I'm glad it's a deviation from Voyager's standard aggressive-alien-of-the-week formula. But I wasn't moved by it. I didn't feel I was given much reason to care that much about Kelly (hope that doesn't make me sound heartless - it reminded me a bit of DS9's Sound of Her Voice which left me similarly unaffected), so I was strangely unmoved by all the log entries at the end, which seemed oddly placed in terms of the episode's structure and pacing. The plot itself was a bit stale and hackneyed and Chakotay's characterisation also seemed off - but that could be because he didn't have much of a character at all at this point in the series. Finally, I had to raise an eyebrow at the fact Voyager's crew was holding a funeral/memorial service on the bridge of all places. The bridge??
Jay - Sun, Sep 4, 2011 - 8:13pm (USA Central)
Chakotay says they've speculated about metallic lifeform s but never found one, but what what about the silver blood from the Demon planet that they wrung two episodes out of?
Jay - Sun, Sep 4, 2011 - 8:16pm (USA Central)
And Chakotay should be horsewhipped for risking the crews lives to drag some ancient module out...
Chris Harrison - Fri, Jan 27, 2012 - 1:15pm (USA Central)
Chakotay should have been court-martialed for his misguided, potentially fatal command decision.

He was selfish. He shouldn't have put his own interests above the safety of his subordinates (and friends). Morally inexcusable.
V - Sat, Feb 4, 2012 - 8:21pm (USA Central)
For me this is 5 stars, the best voyager episode ever! I've watched this when it first aired, rerun, now on netflix and I still feel the same. I never felt the sledgehammer, honestly, I didn't care about the tribute. To me the episode was about an individual. How heI felt vulnerable and frustrated and how much the astronaut doesn't want to feel hopeless. Gave me a glimpse that the trek humanity is not as far flung as I previously believed. This man saw beyond his little world. I love this episode.
Elliott - Fri, Mar 2, 2012 - 4:34pm (USA Central)
@ V:

Thank you for that; yes, the true genius of the episode (which is ostensibly about the differences between earlier, though fictionalised, space travelling and TNG era same) is in the nature of Kelly's character: he is an evolutionary link between the humans of today and the humans of the 24th century--showing us how through courage and nobility of spirit, the now-dormant altruistic qualities which enable exploration and discovery can emerge as dominant traits in the human race. The honour guard for this man pays homage not primarily to his contributions to the furthering of man's venture into space, but to his status as a martyr to the cause of human betterment.

My only qualm with the episode is I wish Chakotay had been able to keep the spotlight. At least they gave it to someone worthy of attention on any day.
Captain Jim - Wed, Apr 11, 2012 - 9:31pm (USA Central)
Damien said, "I too thought it was rather pointless retrieving the body only to shoot it into space again."

Seriously. What the heck was that all about? The only thing that didn't really make sense in this episode.

Michael said, "This is an O.K. episode but not way is it 3.5 stars. 2.5, more like."

I have to agree with this too. It was fine, but I really didn't think it was a stand-out episode. I was expecting more based on Jammer's high rating.
Destructor - Wed, Jun 13, 2012 - 11:05pm (USA Central)
This is one of my favourite episodes- a Voyager classic and really one of the highlights of the 6th season.
Flynn - Thu, Oct 11, 2012 - 10:24am (USA Central)
Jeez, there are a lot of cynical, jaded, plain evil people here. How anyone cannot relate to the suffering of a man trapped in a subspace phenomena and never see anyone again is beyond me. The honour guard scene brought a tear to my eyes, it was perfect.
Jo Jo Meastro - Sat, Jul 27, 2013 - 11:23am (USA Central)
This was a very elegantly crafted and brilliantly done episode on all parts. It had a beating human heart at its crux that bled warmth and genuine emotion with seemingly no effort at all.

As you may have guessed, I was a fan! I felt it almost had a movie-like quality and its one of those Star Trek gems which resonate with everyone because its simply a wonderful human story.

Robert Picardo is a one to watch, his work in the directors' chair is always naturally charming and very impressive...much like his acting! An easy 4 stars from me.
Nancy - Sun, Aug 11, 2013 - 10:45pm (USA Central)
Wow, what an amazing episode. I was moved to tears, especially at the beautiful final shot where he was "buried at sea" so to speak. For those who think that was silly, I say giving Kelley a proper send off with full honors was only right, and far better than just abandoning his corpse.

I don't consider this a tragic episode, because Kelley gave his life for a higher purpose, one that is the center of the Star Trek mythos that I love. I found it uplifting, in fact.

BTW, I was sure Chakotay was going to be able to get out just in time with the module early in the episode. When he didn't, it was a nice splash of "realism" - sometimes gambles don't always pay off.

A beautiful episode.
azcats - Tue, Aug 13, 2013 - 10:21am (USA Central)
i was quite aware that they were forcing paleontology onto a member of the crew. I guess it is good it wasnt Paris, as he cant know ALL the history so well. lol

but i did like that the episode does show our astronauts are at the mercy of technology.

i liked Phil Morris acting. very entertaining episode.
3 stars
Yanks - Fri, Aug 16, 2013 - 1:02pm (USA Central)
I didn't rate this episode a 4 because if Chakotay's incompetence. He should be court-martialed for putting his ship and crew at risk in violation of direct orders from Janeway.

Aside from that, this episode is a gem.

During this episode, Seven initially has a dismissive attitude towards LT Kelley and the "value" of his 300 year old accomplishments. She has no concept of the risk taken and what baby steps were hurdled as humans reached out to the stars. The Borg don't explore, they assimilate. Humans at this level of technology wouldn't have even interested them so the effort here doesn't register to her. As Seven listens to LT Kelley's tapes we see her gradually change her attitude. Normally a mission focused unemotional unit in a collective with no concept of risk, Seven begins to understand the concept of what it meant to be a true explorer and hero. She comes to appreciate sacrifice and selfless dedication exhibited by Kelley as he states his mission isn't a failure and continues to explore with the clear realization the fruits of his labor would never be seen as his life was going to end trapped in a little metal box with no windows. She comes to realize that Kelley was an individual that chose to take this risk for the betterment of humanity. He's not just a drone assigned a task in which he has no choice but to comply.

Seven's comment to Kelley "The Yankees, in six games" during his memorial service is the culmination of this growth. Another baby step in her quest to become human again and understand humanity.

Wonderful episode. 3.5 stars
beej - Tue, Aug 20, 2013 - 2:53am (USA Central)
I find it hard to believe the gang could scavenge the ancient spacecraft for a part and have it adapted for use in the shuttle about 3 minutes later, but hey whatever. Guess those early 21st century spaceship designers really knew what they were doing.
Lt. Yarko - Fri, Aug 23, 2013 - 1:49am (USA Central)
"Jeez, there are a lot of cynical, jaded, plain evil people here. How anyone cannot relate to the suffering of a man trapped in a subspace phenomena and never see anyone again is beyond me."

I wouldn't call it evil. More like emotionally immature. And, yeah, there are a couple of those who have been regular commenters. No biggie. We are all where we are in life. These people might eventually learn to appreciate true drama or they will just love 'slosions for the rest of their lives. To each his own. I just hate when people attack others who have differing opinions. That annoying jerk Elliott comes to mind who can't simply disagree, but has to accuse others of having "invalid" opinions. If people don't agree with him, they are WRONG.

Decent episode, but I found Chakotay and Seven's behavior to be out of character completely and totally inexcusable. As Jammer eluded to, it's weird how character personalities keep reverting back to the past. It's happened a number of times with several of them. I simply don't accept that Seven would be complaining about human fascination with history at this point. We've covered this ground.

3 stars because of the poignancy of the run in with the past. Docking a star because of the shaky character work and pointless ticking clock plot nonsense. Wouldn't it have been enough that they simply discover and retrieve the module without having to put their lives in danger? I guess not.
Nic - Tue, Sep 17, 2013 - 1:32pm (USA Central)
Great episode. But is anyone else wondering what Kelly was doing in orbit of Mars with a team on the ground in the first place? It's certainly not consistent with our missions on the moon. They obviously don't have a transporter, so either he landed and took off again (which seems like a waste of fuel) or they took some sort of shuttle down, in which case they wouldn't have access to all the scientific equipment that's on board the craft itself. I realise this detail was important for the story to work, but it seems odd.
Grumpy - Tue, Sep 17, 2013 - 4:59pm (USA Central)
"It's certainly not consistent with our missions on the moon."

Is this a typo? If anything, it's inspired too much by the Apollo approach -- two on the surface, command module pilot orbits solo* -- rather than any Mars missions currently speculated, which wouldn't waste an astronaut on an orbital mission that, unlike the Apollo era, can be (and is today) done by robotic spacecraft.

*Off the top of my head, seven men have flown solo around the Moon: John Young, Michael Collins, Dick Gordon, Stu Roosa, Al Worden, TK Mattingly, and Ron Evans.
Maxwell Anderson - Sat, Jan 4, 2014 - 2:44pm (USA Central)
Nic, I think Grumpy is right with regards to real life, but the point you raise can be applied to Star Trek away mission protocol generally, going back all the way to TOS. Small group away missions routinely involve the entire group beaming down to a strange planet all at once, leaving nobody to man the shuttlecraft. Then, the rest of the episode usually is about trying to back to the shuttlecraft after encountering a hostile force. Just a really bone-headed policy that they never get right.
Ric - Tue, May 6, 2014 - 12:52am (USA Central)
Delightful episode, a joy to watch from the beginning to the end. A poignant, insightful hour of characters development, framed in a smart way to play with Chakotay's passion for historic artifact, Paris' passion for old machinery and Seven's journey to find her humanity. All together, accompanied by Kelly's commitment to exploration. Sum that to the strong while subtle acting, with a beautiful last scene. The result is you have something that, with less than 4 full stars, can be only classified as underrated.
K'Elvis - Fri, May 23, 2014 - 10:04pm (USA Central)
A good episode. The only nitpick is leaving his body in space. They should have put it in storage and returned it to Earth. He did talk about returning home, they could at least have returned his body home. There was no point to retrieve the body only to leave it again.

When Chakotay was told that he didn't have two minutes to adjust the tractor, he was told to return to Voyager, and that's what he did. He was not told not to tractor the ship, only that he didn't have time to adjust the tractors.
domi - Tue, Jun 17, 2014 - 1:28am (USA Central)
Well I've had enough of Voyager finding random junk from the Alpha quadrant. I have a better chance of randomly and accidentally finding a 100 million dollar lottery ticket in a haystack whilst simultaneously being struck by lightning whilst simultaneously being attacked by a shark.

The plot was contrived, the acting was terrible (especially Chakotay...albeit he was written poorly in the first place), and the drama was forced--and all this was wrapped up in the most pretentious package since Timeless.

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