Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Voyager

"Juggernaut"

**1/2

Air date: 4/26/1999
Teleplay by Bryan Fuller & Nick Sagan and Kenneth Biller
Story by Bryan Fuller
Directed by Allan Kroeker

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"I didn't think Vulcans believed in luck."
"As a rule, we don't. But serving with Captain Janeway has taught me otherwise."

— Seven and Tuvok

Nutshell: It looks good, but the needle on the think-o-meter maintains a level very near zero.

Roxann Dawson is an actress of enormous appeal: edgy, attractive, energetic, convincing—and projecting lots of intelligence. It's too bad the stories can't dig deeper into her character in a quest for finding something new. The latest B'Elanna vehicle, "Juggernaut," seems for the most part pitched to a crowd that doesn't want to be bothered with thinking about anything unfolding on the screen. Not that that's necessarily a bad thing, because "Juggernaut" exploits Dawson's talents nonetheless, even if in primarily superficial ways.

This is the type of episode that's all atmosphere and minimal substance. With perhaps one key exception, what substance we have is mostly unmistakably obvious, with the lesson telegraphed far in advance.

But that doesn't really matter too much, because "Juggernaut" is an hour sold almost completely on performance, direction, and production values. The only real mystery here: How did it require three writers to come up with such a bare-boned story?

"Juggernaut" isn't bad; it's just really, really simple. It's B-movie action/adventure, with 20th-century themes that look like they were purchased at a bargain store. Maybe I'm somewhat spoiled right now with the deeply layered story arc of Deep Space Nine currently unfolding, but I think Voyager can dig a little deeper than this.

Here lies the epitome of safe, mainstream appeal. Maybe that's why it was made. Episodes like this make my job as a reviewer a cake walk. I'm scarcely inspired to think about what I've seen (what you see is about all you get), so all I really need to do is react. My reaction is something along the lines of, "Nice sets, nice dirt, nice grime, nice smoky atmosphere." And, of course, "Nice job, Roxann Dawson." Dawson gets a chance to look real cool and badass-esque this week.

Anyway, to get the big gripe out of the way, I must ask: What the hell are the Malon doing out here? Shouldn't they be about 25 years behind Voyager's present position? Supposing they do have some form of ultra-fast travel—which given past stories doesn't seem at all likely—why don't we hear about it? I'm not trying to nitpick, but the presence of the Malon not only seems incredibly dubious, but is indicative of a thinking pattern that is frighteningly similar to encountering the Kazon again and again during season two. One of the biggest appeals of season five is that we got two giant leaps closer to the Alpha Quadrant, instilling a sense of progress in the series. Now all of a sudden the writers bring back the Malon, so what am I supposed to be thinking? That 25 years is just a joke to be utilized when the producers feel like it? (Grrrr.)

Putting aside the continuity holes, however, the episode does manage to make the Malon somewhat more interesting than past episodes ("Night," "Extreme Risk") have depicted them. These toxic-waste haulers, labeled none-too-happily "the scourge of the quadrant" by Torres at one point in the story, take on a certain depth here, mainly because the story has the Voyager crew working with them rather than against them. The Malon here are more fully defined people instead of cheap sources of conflict.

The lead Malon survivor, Fesek (Ron Canada), offers a sympathetic and fairly interesting persona as a laborer who doesn't particularly like the fact he has to haul around toxic waste to earn a living, but simply accepts it as a simple fact of life (as well as all the permanent damage his body takes because of radiation poisoning). The Malon come across as a well-intentioned but flawed society with a toxic waste issue that unfortunately seems to earn them that reputation, "scourge of the quadrant." They dump their waste, but try to do so safely, in isolated areas of space. Internal to their society, there are those who sacrifice their well-being—the "core laborers," who work so close to the reactor that they're likely setting themselves up for an early death—for the benefit of the "greater good," hence the appropriate issue of the "juggernaut."

The main premise is one of those race-against-the-clock machines: Malon ship experiences mechanical catastrophe; Malon crew is mostly killed; Voyager crew happens upon crippled Malon ship, rescues a few Malon survivors; Malon tell Voyager crew that Malon vessel will blow up very soon, laying waste to massive areas of space; Voyager crew—led by engineering whiz Lt. Torres—must help quickly defuse Malon reactor before occurrence of big explosion.

The rest of the story comprises the away team walking, crawling, or running through Malon tunnels in an attempt to shut down the reactor (via loosely story-defined "checkpoints") before it blows. There's a twist: A creature might be looming in the tunnels. No maybe about it—one of the team, an ill-fated Malon that should've been wearing a red shirt—gets attacked (to death) by this "creature." We don't get a good look at the creature, of course, until the end, when the "creature's" identity wraps up the story (more on that in a moment).

Aside from the simple mechanics of the plot, the central character story is about B'Elanna's emotional control problems. A scene early in the episode has B'Elanna being counseled by Tuvok on the finer points of meditation, etc., as Tuvok plays Yoda and offers B'Elanna insights like, "The rage within you runs deep."

This isn't bad, but it's about as subtle as a brick—to the face. The whole characterization is written and played up to an obviousness that requires very little effort on the part of the viewer. And we can tell far in advance that Torres' anger—which can also provide "a source of strength," as Tuvok says—will be used later in the story on the hardware side of the plot (as a source of strength, naturally).

Character-wise, haven't we been here, and done this? Why is it we suddenly have B'Elanna unable to control her emotions, in an overstated manner that seems to regress her character back to season one? I like B'Elanna's fire, but it's much better utilized as an aspect of the character (like her fury concerning the genocide cover-up in third season's "Remember," for example) rather than the embodiment of it.

Also, something in Dawson's contract this season apparently says she must remove layers of clothing every time she becomes the anchor of a show. (Pleading guilty, I'll note the trend, but I won't complain about it.) It's nice to have female-driven action out here in TV land, but given the character's history, couldn't this be worth more? I suppose my biggest complaint is that we don't get enough B'Elanna episodes, and I hate to see the few we get devoted to almost completely hardware-driven stories.

Synopsis of the hardware aspect of the story would be relatively pointless; one can't convey atmosphere in a review (at least not in a way that would be worth the space devoted to description). Suffice it to say the corridor-traipsing is sufficiently well executed for what it sets out to do. The ending has all the major characters trapped in the reactor room while the "creature" is zeroing in on them ... as Seven, back aboard Voyager, monitors a viewscreen with the floor plan of the Malon ship denoting the location of Our Heroes and the "creature" in a cinematic statement obviously inspired by Alien and a dozen other movies.

The "creature" turns out to be not a creature but a core laborer who has gone insane with a quest for vengeance and has sabotaged his own ship, with the new intention of killing everyone on board the vessel and blowing it up. I have mixed feelings on the monster turning out to be a disgruntled crewman. On one hand, it's not very interesting; but on the other, it does make the juggernaut theme more solid.

That brings us to the hour's one moment of genuine thought—the moment where B'Elanna is the last line of defense between the core laborer and his plan to blow up the ship. The obviousness of B'Elanna's temper protecting herself and her shipmates follows the pattern along the obvious line established early in the episode, as she beats him into submission and is able to delay the ship's destruction. However, the consequences of the violence are briefly considered before and after the fact. B'Elanna tries to first reason with the core laborer before resorting to the necessary violence. And after the crisis is over, there's a good scene where she goes back to her quarters and ponders the unfortunate nature of having to resort to anger and violence—something I imagine she hoped to avoid when she started the mission.

Other than this one scene, most of the plot is mechanical A-to-B plotting. Still, though, I found "Juggernaut" appealing for all the superficial reasons it probably set out to be. The production values made for good, grimy eye-candy, and Dawson is extremely watchable in a physical role, where ultimately she's fighting off toxic-waste Malon baddies with a pipe. If I'm going to see characters in a potboiler story like this, B'Elanna is a particularly good choice.

I'm a B'Elanna fan. I think she's the most unjustly underused character on Voyager's ensemble (opposed to Neelix, who is generally a more justly underused character—but that's just a cheap shot that I couldn't resist). I was looking forward to "Juggernaut." Dawson doesn't disappoint. Nor does the atmosphere. But the overall simplicity of the story doesn't give the character what she's due.

Next episode: Seven takes some lessons on romance.

Previous episode: Think Tank
Next episode: Someone to Watch Over Me

Season Index

31 comments on this review

David Forrest - Thu, Feb 7, 2008 - 1:15pm (USA Central)
This episode was very enjoyable to me, and I love Roxann Dawson. The last thirty seconds defintely would propel this episode to at leat a recommended rating. I enjoyed this episode from the beginning of the hour but the ending with B'Elanna remembering how she just attacked the man at the end was done very well. It showed that she still had yet to get over her internal anger.
Jason - Sun, Apr 6, 2008 - 10:48am (USA Central)
For some reason, I always laugh at the scene were Neelix is tasting his theta-radiation concoction in the mess hall. It's a cute, funny scene between him and Chakotay, and Phillips' "gag-reflex" is just hysterical.
John Pate - Fri, Jan 16, 2009 - 2:36pm (USA Central)
I'm watching this episode right now and, like "Voyager" in general, this episode has stood the test of time and still delivers entertainment and looks good even by the standards of 2009.
Dizzle - Mon, Aug 17, 2009 - 1:53pm (USA Central)
"Whatever you say, Miss Turtlehead."
Keb Egervari - Fri, Nov 27, 2009 - 6:44pm (USA Central)
Okay, I'm only 7 minutes into the episode... but what the hell are the maylon's doing out in this part of space. Wasn't there 2 episodes where voyager put 10 years of their journey... thus moving forward 20,000 light years more or less? Do the maylon's really occupy that much of space? What a joke.
Ken Egervari - Sun, Nov 29, 2009 - 10:32am (USA Central)
This episode sucks. I give it 1 or 1.5 stars out of 4.

There are so many lines and plot devices that are used to death on this show. There is no drama and suspense at all, even though the show requires it. It's just typical voyager affair.

Even the lesson at the end is telegraphed from the outset, but it comes off as just bad. They've introduced Belanna's temper problem from the first few episodes of the series, yet they try and tackle it now nearly 6 years on the ship? Even then, it's been relatively in check since those episodes.

More so, I can't get past the the usage of the Maylons. Didn't they discover this species in the beginning of the season? Since then, Voyager has gained nearly 20,000 light years closer to earth as a result of Timeless and Dark Frontier. I would have to think that any species they met in the past are long gone by now. That's 20,000 light years people!

Yet, we run into the Maylon's again. The episode before, they ran into the Think Tank... and they were aware of the Vidians. Can you believe it? The Vidians! That's season 1/2! There is no way anyone in this part of space would even know who they are.

The writers clearly don't care about this sort of thing, and I can't ignore it while I watch.

In the end, the series proves to be as directionless as ever. This is terrible character piece, and it doesn't contribute to anything about the big picture.

Just terrible.
Ken Egervari - Sun, Nov 29, 2009 - 10:38am (USA Central)
I also don't understand how the Think Tank people knew about the Vidians, which is probably 30,000 light years because Kes took them further as well. That's nearly half the span of the delta quandrant. How is it that all the delta quandrant species know about each other from such great distances, but they know nothing of alpha quandrant species?

I can understand species like the Borg popping up all the time - they have a massive 'empire' so to speak. The federation does as well, as does the Dominion. There are very few powers that rival these, as the delta quandrant has proven to be pretty back-water compared to alpha quandrant. There hasn't been any big species like klingons or romulans or cardassians - the major players. Honestly, any space-fairing civilization has been pretty pathetic in the delta quandrant, having 1 world most of the time. Whoppie. Yet, everyone in the same of 30,000 knows about them. What a joke.
Eric - Mon, Nov 30, 2009 - 12:06am (USA Central)
The Krenim, those xenophobic anti-telepaths from 'counterpoint', and those guys in "The Swarm" (season 3). All had GREAT empires spanning hundreds (thousands? millions? considering how hard it seemed to go around their territories, they must be pretty big) of stars consisting of only one species. (as opposed to the federation, which is only great because its composed of hundreds of species)

If voyager has managed to cover this much ground in such a small amount of time using spacial vortexes and such, why can't other species do it? Heck, they know the quadrant much better than the voyager crew; they should be able to find the wormholes and such more easily than they can. Not to mention they've had a lot more time to explore than Voyager had.

Nasa's got 2 probes that were launched in 1977 (named Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 - ha!), since then they've both gathered data about different planets in our system, and by 1998 Voyager 1 was departing the solar system. They're hoping eventually to get data about something called the "heliopause" at the outer edge of the system (whatever that means). Now imagine how much ground you'd cover, how much you'd explore with that amount of time AND ships that can go up to 21,000 times the speed of light? Why wouldn't some species know about another species 20,000 light years away? if you could sustain warp 9.9 the whole trip, it would take less than 20 years to get there. Can't sustain that speed? Need to 'refuel' or whatever? OK lets say 40 years. 40 years is nothing!
Ken Egervari - Mon, Nov 30, 2009 - 2:30am (USA Central)
To be fair, voyager has got most of it boosts through weird events, like getting kes' help and through time travel glitches and getting borg technology. The only vortex I remember was in night, and I think that was only a 1 or 2 year boost.

Yes, the Krenim had an empire in various stages. Mighty convenient that they skipped it in 1 episode after the time was reset. I think when it was all said and done, they emerged with something that wasn't quite so big. Perhaps the size of the romulans.

Nonetheless, there are loads of inconsistencies. The entire delta quandrant is totally unaware of the alpha quandrant. They haven't visited it. They know of no races in the alpha quandrant. Nothing. And yet we are to believe that the Maylon's have an empire the span of 20,000 light years. A civilization that can't even recycle it's own anti-matter waste. Not buying it. I'm really not.
Michael - Sun, Jul 4, 2010 - 5:54pm (USA Central)
Ah, Torres and her anger management problem. Dr. Phil on Line 1! *rolls eyes*

They're stuck on a vessel with a lethal explosion impending in less than three minutes. Harry "Can't-Get-a-Lock" Kim, of course, can't get a lock - now there's a surprise! And rather than pummeling the angry alien hellbent on the destruction of them all, Torres gets him to talk about his feelings in those 2.5 minutes they've all left to live. Jesus Harold Christ. Such idiotic scripts should be made illegal under criminal law.

The rest of the show is O.K., if too New Agey meditation-heavy for my taste. 2-2.5 stars is about right. It is, however, FAR inferior to the previous episode, which very undeservedly got the same rating.
navamske - Mon, Sep 6, 2010 - 7:08pm (USA Central)
I had a couple of problems with this episode: (1) Wouldn't it have been smart to send the Doctor over to the Malon ship since he can't be affected by the hazards over there? (2) Because of the toxic danger but also because of the danger of being exposed to vacuum, why didn't they wear spacesuits? (3) Neelix may be an expert on toxic-waste disposal (sure, whatever the problem at hand is, you can be sure Neelix has it on his resume), but is it a good idea to send a guy with one lung over to an environment where there are known breathing difficulties? (4) When they were evacuating the depressurizing deck, Chuckles gets hit by a pipe coming at him from the direction he just left. Shouldn't all the debris be flying in the direction of the hull breach? (5) Malon Guy's got medicine that'll fix up Torres. Sure, it's Malon medicine, but let's just assume it works on and isn't fatal to humans and Klingons. (I think it's plausible that the injections the Doctor prepared were calibrated for Malon physiology.)
Cloudane - Thu, Dec 23, 2010 - 7:23pm (USA Central)
Undead toxic waste boogeyman yeahhhh!
It's only interesting/funny because I'm drunk. In any other circumstances I think I'd definitely struggle to give it the 2.5 stars that it got.

I have to admit, it had some genuine comedy (although unrelated to the main story) - the turtlehead quote and the gag reflex comments.

That's about it though. Fun if you're hammered.
Cloudane - Thu, Dec 23, 2010 - 7:28pm (USA Central)
Oh but I do have to add, is it just me or was Torres / Dawson ridiculously hot coated with muck, slime and sweat. YES.I.WOULD. !
Bobbers - Mon, Jan 3, 2011 - 4:07am (USA Central)
@cloudane I thought the exact same thing. Dirty.
Sam - Fri, May 20, 2011 - 1:41am (USA Central)
This show makes me want to play Fallout. The final boss was a Ghoul!
Captain Jim - Mon, Mar 26, 2012 - 10:58pm (USA Central)
David Forrest said: "This episode was very enjoyable to me, and I love Roxann Dawson. The last thirty seconds definitely would propel this episode to at least a recommended rating."

Why? Just because she took her top off? :D
Justin - Sun, May 6, 2012 - 12:06pm (USA Central)
At this point in the series run I'm really starting to get frustrated with the writers' blatant disregard for continuity. Wanna bring the Silver Blood Aliens back? Why not? I mean it will only require a few plot holes (make that gaping chasms) to pull it off. Oooh, how about a story about some toxic waste monsters? Sure, but ya gotta involve the Malon to make it work. OK, so we'll just ignore the fact that we've left them 25,000 light years behind. Yeah, that's the ticket.

What bugs me the most is that the exact same story could have been told with a new alien race instead of the Malon. Why should the Malon have the galactic market cornered on industrial waste?

What's more, is that this isn't even the worst offense. The Hirogen come back in season six ("Tsunkatse") and the Hirogen holograms are coming up...wait for it...in SEASON 7! Gah!!!
F.S. - Tue, Aug 14, 2012 - 10:39pm (USA Central)
Maybe the Malon found another wormhole and are using it to dump their waste? Of course it's weird that there is another ship near that one while the other one was "private", but maybe it's a corporation running that wormhole and not just a single captain. It probably should have been explained, and it would have been easy to do so (just have B'Elanna drop a using wormholes when she wants to insult them).
Jeffrey Bedard - Wed, Sep 26, 2012 - 7:26am (USA Central)
As usual, production values were fine. At this point in VOYAGER'S run that goes without saying.

I did find it odd for them to be characterizing Torres they way they do here. I don't even remember Torres acting quite so out of control in season 1.

When Tuvok says to Janeway that Torres is unpredictable, I felt the complete opposite. Torres, in Tuvok's mind, is filled with angry emotions and will lose her temper at the slightest provocation. How is that unpredictable.

I also had to laugh at the "warm fuzzy" moment when Janeway tells Tuvok she won't be sending him over because she doesn't want Torres to think Janeway doesn't trust her. Just another example of the main characters doing whatever they want for the benefit of themselves and not the mission or the wellbeing of the ship and crew.

Dawson does a great job as usual, but this is hardly a story which really needed to be told.

Having Torres reflect on her violent act at the end of the episode is a mature handling of this kind of situation which is rarely seen on this show.
Jay - Tue, Jan 15, 2013 - 1:49pm (USA Central)
@ Justin...

The worst offense has to be S7's "Homestead", where we have a Talaxian colony at what must be almost the border of the Beta Quadrant...
Arachnea - Sun, Jan 20, 2013 - 7:19am (USA Central)
I agree 100% with Jammer about R. Dawson. In my opinion, she's the best actress on Star Trek and I'd have liked to see more about B'elanna.

On top of that, she's a beautiful women... though, I don't really care about beautiful women. That's something that's always bothered me: all the women are (with very few exceptions) attractive. On the other hand, all the men (with very few exceptions) are not really handsome.

If you're a man but no top-model, you have a chance of being hired. If you're a woman, you must be somewhat charming. I'm not a feminist, but if I'm not bothered by unattractive guys - if they are good actors - the same should be true for women, shouldn't it ? And if you don't agree, so let us have some good-looking men too !

Sorry, that was my yearly ranting ;-).
W Smith - Sat, Apr 13, 2013 - 1:41am (USA Central)
What the hell are the Malons doing out here? C'mon, it's just ridiculous. And, yes, even worse it the Talaxian colony in season 7. It's completely illogical plot holes like these that made Voyager much less than it could have been. That the writers and powers that be did not do due diligence to set up an even minimally consistent and rational show milieu exhibits a lack of respect for their audience's intelligence.
Sintek - Fri, May 24, 2013 - 9:42am (USA Central)
Because Voyager was made for unthinking morons. Look at Michael up there - an example of Voyager's target audience.
navamske - Fri, May 24, 2013 - 8:44pm (USA Central)
@Ken

"The entire delta quadrant is totally unaware of the alpha quadrant. They haven't visited it. They know of no races in the alpha quadrant. Nothing."

Not only that, but some of them seem to call their area "the Delta Quadrant" or have no problem adopting that usage when the Voyager people introduce it. "The Delta Quadrant" is an Alpha Quadrant designation. Suppose aliens showed up and said to us, "We're stranded here in the Omega Sliver" -- we'd be like, "This ain't the Omega Sliver; it's the Alpha Quadrant." (Or, "it's the Sol system.")
Jo Jo Meastro - Thu, Jun 20, 2013 - 12:59pm (USA Central)
Something about this episode reminded me of the classic Tom Baker years of Doctor way back in the 1970s, I can't quite put my finger on why but I got that similar vibe and atmosphere from somewhere. That season 2 episode with the robots (I believe it was 'Prototype'?) was a more obvious Vintage Who homage, I wonder if someone in the writing staff grew up watching Doctor Who!

Anyways, it was another likably fun and stylishly charming episode that I enjoyed. Its' substance was engrossing without being deep, its' action fun without being tense, and overall it's very likable without quite managing to reach lovable. But for a standard adventure it does the job nicely, 3 stars would cover it IMO.

On a side note, Neelix could really use a course in basic food hygiene! His hacking all over the food as he stirs it with his used spoon, dipping his fingers in and having that long hair swinging about unchecked...I'd take the replicators thanks, Neelix!
azcats - Wed, Aug 7, 2013 - 2:53pm (USA Central)
I am glad that voyager used Neelix less and less as the seasons went on. i think we can thank Seven for that.

but the gag reflex bit was funny. as so was turtlehead.

yes, why couldnt have they just added this a few episodes earlier? not like they dont plan shows in advance.

this was mildly entertaining. i would give it a 2 star..maybe 2.5 stars.

@arachnea. Nana Visitor is no model. and the doctor in 2nd season of TNG...nuh uh.

i like the comments about the "Omega Sliver." funny stuff.
Nancy - Thu, Aug 8, 2013 - 10:13pm (USA Central)
Not a perfect episode and the last bit was completely gratuitous, but I thought the scene where the room's filling with smoke and you can barely make out the menacing shadowy "bogeyman" was suspenseful and well-done.
Tom - Sat, Aug 31, 2013 - 5:14pm (USA Central)
@Jason,

When the Hirogen were first introduced in season 4 they were shown to have relay stations that reached all the way to the alpha quadrant. I think it's safe to say that they are a widely traveled species.

I don't really have a problem with the Malon or Talaxians showing or whoever showing up again ahead of Voyager. Why should we assume that all species gained warp drive when humans did? That's kind of arrogant.

Besides, at this time in Trek lore, the Feds have listening posts in the Gamma quadrant. That's like what, 25,000 light years from Earth?

So I just think this argument is a bit nitpicky.
Jay - Fri, Sep 6, 2013 - 6:49pm (USA Central)
Well, Tom, if we go with that, then we might as well have seen Hirogen or Talaxians or Malon here in Federation, Romulan, or Klingon space by now.
Chris P - Tue, Feb 4, 2014 - 8:05pm (USA Central)
So far the comments have come up with a good list of ridiculous-bordering-on-criminal oversights by the writers but I think the craziest thing in this episode:

A single Malon freighter exploding (everything within 3-5 light years dies) would be enough to destroy the entire Dominion fleet.

This episode establishes into Star Trek canon that the most powerful weapon in the galaxy is a Malon Garbage Truck.
Petrus - Sat, Mar 8, 2014 - 9:54am (USA Central)
I just finished watching this. I'm pretty sure I would have seen it before, but it was obviously so long ago that I don't remember.

As I said in my review of "Faces," I find Roxanne Dawson to be probably the single most sexually attractive Trek actress I've seen; and I'd fairly happily watch B'Elanna for hours.

With that said, this was by far the weakest B'Elanna episode I've seen. Yes, she's fiery, and I love that; but at the same time, temper still usually needs some sort of motivation. Here her temper seems purely arbitrary, most of the time. She's angry just because she's angry, and for no other reason.

Anyone who's seen "Gravity," will also know how much irony there is in Tuvok teaching Torres anger management; Tuvok might be Vulcan, but it's still a true case of the blind leading the blind, there.

There also wasn't enough action here for me, or at least not enough action that had a real point in terms of the characters or the story. I like action, but not when it is mindless, or occurs purely for its' own sake. Chakotay gets hit in the head, which doesn't really do much except maybe raise tension slightly, although you know that, as a regular character, of course he's going to be ok.

B'Elanna attempting to reason with the alien, however, and plead with it before killing it, is a good example of why VOY has become my favourite Trek series of the lot. There was action in this show, and during a few episodes said action becomes fairly intense; but despite survival occasionally being an issue (although nowhere near as much as it should have been, I know Jammer) the characters' commitment to principle demonstrated that this was still genuine Star Trek.

So yeah; Roxanne looking sexy is always a big plus, but I kept waiting for her to have an interesting character moment like she did in "Faces," and except for the brief conflict and flashback at the end, she never really does. It's disappointing.

This one gets two stars from me, with an extra half star due to makeup making Roxanne look as though she'd just been mud wrestling. Yum, yum. ;)

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