Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Voyager

"11:59"

***

Air date: 5/5/1999
Teleplay by Joe Menosky
Story by Joe Menosky & Brannon Braga
Directed by David Livingston

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"To family..." — Captain Janeway's toast

Nutshell: Not riveting execution, but some good feelings and intentions.

"11:59" is a sincerely written reflection upon histories and feelings. It's without a doubt the quietest episode of the season, with no aliens, no action, no gimmicks, and no cheats. The most common complaint I've heard about this episode is that it's "filler." I don't quite understand such an assessment. Just how do you define filler? A story that doesn't advance us to ... what? A story that doesn't have ... what? Explosions? Aliens? An expensive-looking budget? A plot that gets us 10 years closer to the Alpha Quadrant?

"11:59" is different in that it doesn't follow the conventional Voyager pattern. There are no threats to the crew, no sci-fi anomalies. Just some ideas about the past, as Janeway thinks back to memories of her childhood, where she held an ancestor in high regard as her hero and inspiration.

She tells the tale of Shannon O'Donnel, a quiet, lonesome, and uncertain adventurer who sought a role in life that would offer an avenue toward the future.

The story is told in a sort of 400-year flashback, as we follow O'Donnel (played by Mulgrew) through the events of the days prior to New Year's 2001. O'Donnel, in her failing decades-old car, happens upon the small town of Portage Creek, Indiana. There she meets widower Henry Janeway (Kevin Tighe) and his son, Jason (Bradley Pierce). The town is caught up in a controversy involving something called the "Millenium Gate," an ultra-expensive, highly experimental futuristic community that a large corporation hopes to build in the area. The town wants the gate. But standing in the way is Henry Janeway, a man who values books and history and doesn't want to see the town leveled for some newfangled idea of the "future." He's adamantly refusing to sell his bookstore, and if he doesn't do so by midnight on New Year's Eve, the corporation will take their grandiose building plans elsewhere.

O'Donnel's car breaks down, and in order to pay the repair bill, she needs work. Janeway agrees to offer her board for a few days in exchange for work in the bookstore. The rest of the tale shows how O'Donnel's and Janeway's views of the world collide, albeit not in remotely unpleasant ways. Janeway lives in the past, O'Donnel looks toward the future, and a dialog opens between them that offers the viewer two reasonable viewpoints.

It might not be the most original story ever told, but it does make for an hour of friendly themes that are relevant to Kathryn Janeway as a character. One of the interesting aspects of the show is the way the captain holds this ancestor in hero status based on the obstacles she supposedly faced. But through the course of the hour Janeway comes to realize that her learned version of history might not have been the actual truth. Paris is also familiar with history, and he doesn't remember any O'Donnels being on any of the Mars missions, the history of which he has memorized. This leads Janeway to do some deeper research, until she realizes that O'Donnel was a relatively minor player in the Millenium Gate construction, and not quite the audacious adventurer Janeway long believed she was. (It's a revisit to the theme of historical accuracy that was the focus of last season's "Living Witness.")

The flashback story seems to capture some bits of atmosphere of a small Midwest town fairly well, and I appreciated the simple problems of the story and David Bell's appropriate musical accompaniment. We learn O'Donnel has had some tough career luck of late, and one of the corporate officials, Gerald Moss (John Carroll Lynch), offers her an opportunity to work on the groundbreaking engineering project—if she can convince Janeway to let go of the past. (But I must say that given the job market today, I find the idea of a brilliant, apparently respected engineer unable to find work to be slightly dubious.)

"11:59" invests a lot of time in the flashback characters. And perhaps the biggest problem with the episode is that it relies too heavily on the acting chemistry between Mulgrew and Tighe—a chemistry that comes off with mixed results.

There are some good scenes between these two, particularly where they argue their differences concerning the role of people and technology. Henry's son is an example of a youth who is more interested in the future than the past, which makes it pretty hard for Henry to remain so adamant. But despite the decent execution of several quiet dialog scenes, I don't think one key scene that really needed to work well ended up having the emotional payoff if seemed to want.

I'm referring to Henry Janeway's inevitable eleventh-hour change of heart, and especially O'Donnel's realization—through the taste of chocolate-chip cookies, no less—that she has developed such strong feelings for Henry and this town that she has to stay. The sequence is somewhat lackluster sentiment, and I wish it had been more believable. O'Donnel's realization doesn't seem heartfelt; it seems scripted. An earlier scene should've better established her feelings.

Fortunately, I think the impact of this tale on Kathryn Janeway—especially learning that history is not always what it seems—works far better. It's always something of a wake-up call to learn that your childhood hero was just a person with their own agendas and needs, and Janeway finds herself somewhat depressed by that all-too-simple realization.

The episode also knows that "family" is where its heart is at. Sentiment in the flashback sequences may have fallen somewhat flat, but I can't help but admit an affection for the group photo at the end—an image that speaks louder about the Voyager family unit than dialog probably could've.

"11:59" is a pleasant episode. It might not break much new ground and might lack emotional punch in a few important places, but it accomplishes its goal of telling a quiet tale about some people—with no strings attached. I'm inclined to think those who call it "filler" are mislabeling it. Perhaps it's simply an hour of peace, and a plot without the gimmicks we've come to expect.

Next week: Seven takes a trip through the fourth dimension.

Previous episode: Someone to Watch Over Me
Next episode: Relativity

Season Index

42 comments on this review

Pauly - Sun, May 18, 2008 - 6:24am (USA Central)
Another of my top 5 - Wow, I think Season 5 had the most 'winners' in my opinion.
Aaron - Thu, Jul 31, 2008 - 2:14pm (USA Central)
One of the best Treks, ever. Should be included on one of those 'Collective' DVD series.
Jay - Sat, Aug 8, 2009 - 4:17pm (USA Central)
Didn't Janeway say in "Future's End" that she had no idea what any of her relatives were up to in "this" time period?
Paul - Thu, Mar 18, 2010 - 5:43pm (USA Central)
Neelix had contradictory facts in 2 sentences! 'Great Wall only thing visible from space til 22nd century'. 'Millenium gate?oh, that was built in 21st century - also visible from space!'
Tina - Tue, Apr 6, 2010 - 5:05pm (USA Central)
Just to clarify, regarding the Great Wall of China, Neelix said "...before the 22nd century, it was ONE OF the only man-made objects that could be seen from Earth's orbit with the naked eye." [emphasis added]
Michael - Sun, Jul 4, 2010 - 7:12pm (USA Central)
Tina: With the emphasis it makes even less sense! "[B]efore the 22nd century, it was ONE OF the only man-made objects [...]" "One of the only" what? One of only THREE MILLION manmade objects visible from space? Paul's right: Neelix's statement is a contradiction, but, then, he's a dufus anyway.

Anyway, about the show. Two thirds of it is set in the 20th century, saving the crew (the studio crew, that is) having to come up with special effects and decor. Hey, why bother painstakingly creating a 24th-century environment, when you can just go out of the studio on to the street outside to shoot the episode!

Janeway became a captain because of some broad from four centuries previously?! Yeah right. I'll become a blacksmith, how about that!

A really boring and pointless episode, with no "sci" and way too much "fi" of the wrong sort. Wrong century, wrong focus, wrong plot. Unlike the previous abortion of an episode (Someone to Watch...), this one wasn't even funny. 0.5 stars and even that's being generous.
Niall - Thu, Jul 15, 2010 - 2:49am (USA Central)
Fairly good, in a quiet sort of way, until the corny ending in the mess hall and the terrible aging makeup on Janeway...
Tim - Mon, Nov 1, 2010 - 6:12pm (USA Central)
Can't stand it myself. It's made well, but I really can't bring myself to watch it if I rerun the show on DVD, as it just has nothing to do with Star Trek. It really is a filler. Yes, at the end of the episode we've progressed nowhere and maybe that doesn't matter, but we haven't even got any extra depth in a character. Yes we have some background to an ancestor, but it tells you nothing new about Janeway except something she has an interest in.

These kinds of episodes strike me as an excuse for a writer who desires to write something other than sci-fi, but can only get it out there by turning it into a story for a popular sci-fi series.

At least have some humour and/or a strong story to make them interesting. DS9's Far Beyond the Stars, is a good example of a filler done well. This is slow, boring, and of no relevance to Voyager.
Cloudane - Sun, Dec 26, 2010 - 12:06pm (USA Central)
"Filler" is a term best used when dealing with TV shows or movies based on books, or anime based on manga. It refers to material written for the new medium to fill in time, I.e. when keeping only to the original material would make the show too short. It gets a bad reputation because it's usually written by the TV/movie/animation team and not the author so it frequently lacks the original material's quality, attention to detail and sincerity.

It doesn't apply to this in the slightest.

I don't see why episodes should need to have the flashing lights and a space battles every time without fail (I guess Voyager did attract people who like to be spoon fed the same recipe week after week as unfortunately that's the way it went from about S3/4).

The thing about it is that yes it's about a spaceship tens of thousands of light years away trying to get home but it also has characters. I do think they deserve to be treated as characters once in a while and not just props like they have been in seasons 4 and 5 in particular. As such I loved this little insight into Janeway's view of her ancestry and it warmed me somewhat (not before time) to her again.

After a season of mostly using her as "hard headed Captain" it was nice to see the human side again and I enjoyed this quiet and sincere little tale. I'm not saying it should be (have been, rather) like this all the time, it is after all about space and exploration. But it's like (let's use a Voyager Style Random Analogy!) music can't be all peak/chorus, it needs the quieter, slower interludes as well to make it complete.
Jake Taylor - Sat, Mar 12, 2011 - 5:59pm (USA Central)
Man this episode feels so forced in every way. These two people have nothing in common and the are so different, and ages apart. I am shown no reason as a viewer why they should get married. First of all the concept of the whole town being sold to built a "M GATE" is absurd. And that one little bookeeper is going to stop the construction process. Oh yea, I mean they stopped building I 95 when they got to Baltimore because the Nattie Boe Beer Co had a warehouse in the way! Come on! If a project as large as this were this close, Mr. Janeway wouldnt stand in the way. I mean he phone hasn't rang in 3 days anyway we learn. BTW, this goofy thing looks like Farpoint Station, and why the hell would anyone support building this thing, and support buliding it where a town already existed? None of these questions are answered, and none of it makes any sense at all. Its just the usual Voyager boring story that takes up an hour, that is bland and appeals to the masses. Poor storytelling, and unrealistic dialogue.
This episode made me enjoy that idiot Neelix's nonsensical ramblings.
All in all none of this matters, none of it feels real, and I have no reason to care about anyone in this story.
Wilbur - Fri, Jun 10, 2011 - 10:14pm (USA Central)
If they broke ground on the Millenium Gate in Portage Creek, Indiana on 12/31/2001, wouldn't it be done by now? I've been through Indiana lots of times since 2001, and I've never seen anything like this. There is a Portage, Indiana on Lake Michigan right across from Chicago, but there is literally nothing of consequence there. Maybe Janeway found some other way of shutting down the project after all.

Hey, why build this on top of a town anyway? Has anyone driven through Indiana? They have lots of empty spaces where you could build a crazy shopping mall/biodome/plot contrivance.
BlightedSight - Fri, Aug 12, 2011 - 8:32pm (USA Central)
Jammer:(But I must say that given the job market today, I find the idea of a brilliant, apparently respected engineer unable to find work to be slightly dubious.)

Maybe the episode was set 10 years too early because, right now, I definitly believe, and have experienced, respected and brilliant people out of work and unable to find a job.
Jammer - Sat, Aug 13, 2011 - 12:57am (USA Central)
Yeah, what a difference a decade makes.
Iceblink - Mon, Aug 15, 2011 - 8:55am (USA Central)
I remember really not liking this episode when I first saw it (going back about 11 years, I think); it just seemed so random and pointless. Second time around and I enjoyed it a lot more - it's still random and still a bit pointless, but it's also a nice change of pace (although it would have been nice if it had been spaced a bit apart from 'Someone to watch over me' - two very quiet episodes next to each other). Kate Mulgrew gets to show more humanity in her portrayal here than in the entire season and I enjoyed the relaxed, easy-going nature of the episode. The best word to describe this ep is 'pleasant'.
Jack - Sun, Sep 4, 2011 - 12:33pm (USA Central)
SO from "I have no idea what my ancestors were doing in this time frame" in Future's End" to "I wouldn't have become joined Starfleet if it wasn't for Shannen O'Donnell".

Another warning against tossing around throwaway lines that can easily be done without.
Nathan - Wed, Nov 9, 2011 - 9:41pm (USA Central)
"Oh yea, I mean they stopped building I 95 when they got to Baltimore because the Nattie Boe Beer Co had a warehouse in the way! Come on!"

They have eminent domain for highways. Though in certain cases they may be able to do it for economic development (thank you Kelo v. New London) it's extremely rare. One relatively modern example of a holdout affecting plans is the Citigroup Center in NYC: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citigroup_Center#Early_engineering_details

(Actually I-95 was held up for a while due to local opposition, with the final alignment being somewhat different from the original plans; I-70 was never finished, and ends at a park and ride on the city limits. The recently-published book "The Big Roads" about the origins of the Interstates goes into detail about Baltimore's plans.)
Nathan - Wed, Nov 9, 2011 - 10:36pm (USA Central)
Though in this case it was a little silly that they needed to buy up an entire small town. Why not just buy the same amount of land from one outlying farmer?
tobe - Mon, Jan 9, 2012 - 8:21am (USA Central)
Well, call me boring, but when i tune in to Star Trek: Voyager i expect a) a science fiction show b) about Voyager and it's crew. This was neither. Now, I don't mind being surprised by something great, but this was just bland. I guess it's a matter of taste, I also hate mirror universe episodes and Voyager's incessant use of the reset button. This episode just hit reset before it even started.

I also find it something of a stretch that Janeway's great great whatever grandmother was also her identical twin.
Chris - Sat, Jan 14, 2012 - 10:53pm (USA Central)
I'm more in agreement with tobe on this one...it bored me to tears...I don't really care about Janeway's ancestry 400 years ago...I care about Janeway's present mission to get Voyager home, this episode had absolutely nothing to do with that.
Destructor - Thu, Mar 1, 2012 - 7:18pm (USA Central)
The O'Donnell scenes fall flat flat flat for me- total snorefest (although is it me or is Henry a dead ringer for Gene Roddenberry?)

The scenes on Voyager, however, are totally charming and funny, some of the best crew interaction scenes in the series. They don't completely redeem the episode, but I'm very glad to have seen them.
Captain Jim - Wed, Mar 28, 2012 - 10:02pm (USA Central)
Enjoyable enough, if not especially memorable. There have certainly been a lot of episodes that were worse.

Of course, as a resident of Canton, Ohio (also Brannon Braga's hometown), I got a kick out of the repeated references.
Justin - Sun, May 6, 2012 - 3:20pm (USA Central)
Interesting how Michael and the other Tom Paris History Buff haters don't show up for this one. I guess as long as it's made up history it's OK, right?
Paul York - Fri, May 11, 2012 - 10:25pm (USA Central)
Perhaps the one major flaw of ST is that always portrays the future of humanity and technological "progress" as so benign. In fact, the technologically influenced future is more dystopian than utopian, given global warming, nuclear waste, and countless industrial hazards -- all created by industrial and technological development. There could have been star ships and a future without with war or poverty IF humanity's values were no so similar to that of Malon wasteships. However, as long as fossil fuel "petro-tyrranies" reign supreme -- and there is no sign that their power is abating -- then the utopian future will be hellish, not the ideal that ST portrays. The colonists we often see on the M class planets who garden and live simply and in peace is perhaps a better ideal to aspire to right now, given that climate change, peak oil and the mass extinction of species and eco-system disasters caused by extraction industries and toxic pollution -- all in the name of "progress" -- are leading to the end of life on this planet. Colonization of Mars is a distant dream. We need to stop wrecking this planet first. Then we can start to build starships and explore space and meet new species. If they met us in our present condition they would regard us as the Vulcans did upon first contact, or as the aliens did in The Day the Earth Stood Still: unworthy of possessing machines and space technology, given our complete disregard for other species, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. We need to work on our values first and foremost. This episode fails in my opinion because it does not reflect that and portrays the bookstore owner as backward and regressive. Recall "Remembrance" in which non-technological people suffer a genocide; that is the more frightening future we might face as the gap between technological haves and have-nots continues to widen.
Adam - Thu, Jul 5, 2012 - 9:24pm (USA Central)
@Paul:

Might point out that the opposite is true regarding space exploration/settlement. If the earth gets too bad, it would force people into space to find a new place to live. In Asimov's Robots and Empire, the robots purposely cause earth to slowly be uninhabitable in order to force humans into space. People are not going to permanently settle space unless there are economic or social reasons to do so. That's just the way it is. To be honest, I wouldn't mind if global warming forces us into space.
Chip - Tue, Jul 10, 2012 - 10:10pm (USA Central)
This was a great episode. It was great seeing a show that wasn't all about the alien of the week, the attack on Voyager of the week, or "they're going to somehow destroy voyager again" story of the week.

This was about people, their interactions and their finding themselves. And it was good getting away from the ship for a change, into a normal. real world.

I admit that their wasn't real chemistry between O'Donnell & Janeway; they needed to have something more substantial before the "cookie affect". But episodes are not perfect and, despite that failing, this episode was most enjoyable.
milica - Fri, Nov 2, 2012 - 12:32pm (USA Central)
The most boring st episode ever...
Nic - Tue, Apr 23, 2013 - 8:18am (USA Central)
I wouldn't call this episode "filler" (if you did, about 95% of Voyager episodes would have that label), and I enjoyed the scenes set in the present.

As for the O'Donnell story, it didn't work for me at all. One of the reasons is that I completely agreed with Henry Janeway's wish to protect what he cherished most even when it is an inconvenience for a large corporation.
ProgHead777 - Thu, Jun 20, 2013 - 12:16am (USA Central)
I rather enjoyed this episode. It definitely would have been better if the role of Henry Janeway had been better cast. Nothing against Kevin Tighe's acting abilities, but he simply had zero chemistry with Kate Mulgrew in this episode. While the apparent age difference was likely a factor, I don't think it was the ONLY factor. This lack of chemistry was certainly one of the reasons why Henry's drastic change of heart in the end came off as sudden and unrealistic. Shannon's confession of romantic feelings for Henry just simply didn't carry enough emotional weight or resonance with the audience to justify such a dramatic reversal.

Overall, I was engaged by the story that was being told, I was interested to see where it was going, and I was reasonably satisfied by its conclusion. It wasn't a great episode by any measure, but it really doesn't deserve the vitriol it receives in many circles.
Jo Jo Meastro - Fri, Jun 21, 2013 - 8:26am (USA Central)
It was funny seeing such a (near enough) present day story sandwiched into an episode of Voyager. If you took the present day stuff on its own and teaked it just slightly, it could be one of those obscure really corny 1990s' made-for-TV christmas movies!

That may sound like a discredit to '11:59' but I did enjoy it, I think there was intentional fluffiness added because this is the way we often nostalgically reflect and eagerly recount family stories. It managed to be heart warming even while I shook my head at some of the unlikely details of the tale...which is again true with many of the tall tales our parents and aunties love to tell!

I liked the change of pace and it felt well-earned when the crew had their family moment. Given the plot summaries for the last 3 episodes, it looks like the calm before the storm has passed!

I'd give this sentimental, enjoyable and feel-good episode 3 stars. Too bad Enterprises' take on this sort of story (Carbon Creek) was rubbish!
ian - Fri, Jul 26, 2013 - 1:51am (USA Central)
1st. To the enviro-wacko crowd, global warming stopped about 25 years ago, pay attention, if anything we are back to colling. Peak oil is a myth and actually technology has and continues to IMPROVE both humanity AND the environment. The fact is the more adavanced a society becomes the CLEANER it becomes because of technical and human progress.
2nd. Since the so-called milleanium gate is, of course, fiction it was silly to put the story in the present day (more or less). It would have been better and obeyed the previous continuity to simply make it a project in the near future.
azcats - Thu, Aug 8, 2013 - 11:50am (USA Central)
first, i thought it was hilarious when jammer mentioned the job market in 2001 in his 1999 review. between the internet bubble popping and 9/11 he had no idea what was coming just 2 years later.
secondly, my favorite part of the episode was harry kim's story about his ancestors. i liked that whole seen in the lounge.

although, i like the more action mystery episodes, i would say this was good. but maybe only 2 or 2.5.

in truth, i cant wait for next episode. "relativity."wheni think of Voyager i always think of the next episode in season 5.
Nancy - Sat, Aug 10, 2013 - 3:45pm (USA Central)
For those complaining about how this would be more realistic if it were set in the near future... In 1999, when this aired, 2001 WAS the near future.

That said, I found the episode rather dull. The characters of O'Donnell and Henry did not engage me and the episode did not hold my attention.
Tom - Mon, Sep 2, 2013 - 8:02pm (USA Central)
"(But I must say that given the job market today, I find the idea of a brilliant, apparently respected engineer unable to find work to be slightly dubious.)"

Just wait 8 years, Jammer.
T'Paul - Sun, Sep 22, 2013 - 6:11pm (USA Central)
To drop back to a comment above, by Adam, unfortunately I'd have to agree.

I'm quite sure we won't really begin to explore space for new worlds etc until forced to by environmental or economic pressures.

Pleasant enough ep., but like others I didn't especially buy the chemistry between Janeway and O'Donnell, although I'm generally in favour of these more quiet, background episodes.
nick - Sun, Dec 15, 2013 - 11:06am (USA Central)
The building they were building looked like something they'd put up in Dubai. Already they have begun construction of the Kingdom Tower in Saudi Arabia, which will be over 1000 meters high. So, the Star Trek version of the future wasn't that much off, just 10 years or so ;)

The plot set-up was a little hokey - nice touch with the gender roles reversal, very progressive. However, I'm sure Janeway got a good settlement from the corporation for his dusty used book shop and perhaps eventually opened a slightly more upscale place in the new shiny millennium gate; people gotta read right?
Eric - Sun, Jan 19, 2014 - 7:46pm (USA Central)
For those who read Ian's comment and agree with him, (or disagree with him) I recommend the website: "skeptical science". It is a very informative site; all of their articles(as far as I know) provide references to peer-reviewed research papers.

(I know its an old comment, but maybe someone will read it and learn something)
Corey - Wed, Feb 19, 2014 - 5:32pm (USA Central)
As a physicist, Ian's comment bugged me as well, Eric.
SkepticalMI - Wed, Feb 19, 2014 - 10:17pm (USA Central)
I hate to digress, but I'm hoping Eric learns something as well. As an author of 20-odd peer reviewed articles myself, I can assure you that peer review is not synonymous with fact, or even anything more than the most rudimentary quality control.

More importantly, I have a strong distaste for anyone manipulating science for their own agenda, regardless of what agenda that is. The "Skeptical" Science website is anything but. Science is about questioning one's hypotheses and accepting the facts wherever they might lead. It is not about massaging said facts to fit one's political agenda (an all too often circumstance in academia, I'm afraid). John Cook, and many so-called scientists who merely spout the party line about settled science or consensus or whatever without truly engaging real arguments are an affront to my screen name (named after Robert Boyle's famous book that practically created modern chemistry). Instead of seeking to understand and to learn, the site cherry picks and ignores data, conflates multiple issues, and spends time on multiple straw men as proof of other claims.

That's not to say that Ian is correct about everything (although yeah, peak oil is hypothetical math rather than reality). Frank Herbert was wrong; it is not religion and politics being put in the same cart that causes the whirlwind, but rather science and politics. Combining those two is a travesty for both science and politics.
Ric - Thu, Apr 24, 2014 - 3:22am (USA Central)
Not bad, not good. A meh character development episode. Full of holes, short on the deepness it wanted to achieve.
K'Elvis - Sat, May 17, 2014 - 7:22am (USA Central)
The plot of the evil developer and the one holdout who won't sell was a worn-out cliche even when this episode first ran. It's just not a Star Trek episode, it's just a thin veneer over an entirely unrelated story to make it look like Star Trek.

Showing that the problems of today can be solved is not a flaw, it is a strength. If problems cannot be solved then complaining about problems becomes nothing more than bleating. The only people who solve problems are those who believe they can be solved. If a century ago, someone wrote a story about smallpox being eradicated and polio nearly so, many would have laughed.

At the same time, that problems can be solved doesn't mean the doesn't justify the pseudo-skepticism of thinking they the problems don't exist.
colincostello - Sun, Jun 1, 2014 - 4:09pm (USA Central)
A disappointing episode. Not really in the Trek spirit. Well acted, but that is all I can say about it.
Colin
Jeff Bedard - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 - 5:21pm (USA Central)
I do enjoy this episode, but I have to wonder if Voyager's library computer would truly contain the vast amounts of biographical and historical data the crew uses in this episode to research the past. It seems like any starship (not just Voyager) can call up information on anyone or anything no matter what world or time period. I just find it a little hard to believe.

Submit a comment

Above, type the last name of the captain on Star Trek: TNG
Notify me about new comments on this page
Hide my e-mail on my post

Season Index

Copyright © 1994-2014, Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution of any review or article on this site is prohibited. Star Trek (in all its myriad forms), Battlestar Galactica, and Gene Roddenberry's Andromeda are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc., NBC Universal, and Tribune Entertainment, respectively. This site is in no way affiliated with or authorized by any of those companies. | Copyright & Disclaimer