Jammer's Review

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

"You Are Cordially Invited"

**1/2

Air date: 11/10/1997
Written by Ronald D. Moore
Directed by David Livingston

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"Blood, pain, sacrifice, anguish, and death."
"Sounds like marriage all right."
"How would you know?"

— Worf, Bashir, and O'Brien

Nutshell: Pleasant, but predictable. Par for course as wedding "event" shows go.

I've said in the past that the success of a romance on the screen rides on the chemistry between the leads. The problem with Worf and Dax that I've never quite been able to get past is the fact that they don't really seem like they love each other. There just hasn't been the screen chemistry that I expected to come out of these characters' various similarities and differences. Instead, what we usually get from these characters is cliche-ridden squabbles and the hammered-home fact that these are two people who have nothing in common and probably never will.

What's most bothersome about the relationship is the fact that there's so much potential for the writers to make them a believable couple with interesting, multifaceted dimensions—yet we rarely, if ever, see it. "You Are Cordially Invited" features Worf/Dax scenes that are more believable and deeper than many past episodes have fared, but there still isn't quite enough done to overcome the cliches and make believable the passion.

Don't get me wrong. "You Are Cordially Invited" is a decent hour of fluff, and plentiful in amiable scenes. Although I wouldn't say it's a Trek episode you have to see, I wouldn't recommend you miss it either. It's a romantic comedy with some good lines, although it doesn't go the extra mile to flesh out what's most important about itself—namely, analyzing the solid character core of why the relationship exists in the first place.

For a long time I've felt like saying to Worf and Dax, "Okay, so you love each other. Fine. Why do you love each other? Can't we see some of that manifested on the screen in more-than-simply-glib terms?" The chemistry between Dorn and Farrell isn't completely absent here, but I still think this episode warranted to see the softer side of Worf (heck, we saw the harder-edged side of Dax, after all). That brings me to the whole issue of Worf: Why won't the writers let this guy lighten up just a little? Why is he such a stolid, no-fun guy? What happened the Worf on TNG who used to laugh with Guinan? You'd think that if there's anyone who could make Worf lighten up some, it's Dax. Why not explore that possibility? Hopefully, now that the wedding is over with, we won't have to listen to Worf complain about how perfect it needs to be, and better dialog between the newlyweds can prevail.

Well, the reason such dialog doesn't prevail here is because the storyline for "Cordially" centers around the most basic of wedding premises, utilizing the expected cliches that have dominated wedding stories on television and in cinema for decades. The formula states that in the eleventh hour before a wedding, the marriage must be suddenly called off (much to everyone's dismay), and then saved just as quickly as it was cancelled.

Specifically, Dax finds herself challenged by General Martok's wife Sirella (Shannon Cochran), who questions the Trill's worthiness for being accepted into her honorable Klingon house. The conflict, of course, if forced and chock-full of Klingon rituals. Meanwhile, Worf, Martok, and Alexander, along with Worf's closest male friends (read: the other male DS9 regulars of Sisko, O'Brien, Worf, and Bashir), engage in the Kal'Hyah, a series of prenuptial rituals (quickly coined a "Klingon bachelor party") which includes ... well, probably what you could imagine a "Klingon bachelor party" would include.

Many of the stand-alone comic pieces are amusing, as Sisko and the others unwittingly find themselves in a series of traditional endurance tests, including deprivation, blood, pain, sacrifice, anguish, and death. (Bashir: "Sounds like marriage, all right." O'Brien: "How would you know?" Hehe.) It's the typical sort of Klingon humor, but it's funny in its low-key portrayal—including a scene where poor O'Brien and Bashir hang from a pole over hot coals ("I can see the future: I'm gonna kill Worf."), and another where they're preparing to break their long fast with a huge meal once they've heard the wedding has been called off ... only to hear it's back on again. The blank stares on their faces are priceless.

Dax's party is also fun—a particularly fresh, energetic, festive setting. It's always nice to see the wild side of Dax emerge, and after being put through the wringer over the last seven episodes of DS9, a light break is definitely worthwhile. When Sirella interrupts, however—demanding that Jadzia leave her party and stop acting like a "Risian slut" (and I do believe this is the first episode of Trek where I've heard the word "slut" used), Jadzia hits her, and Sirella in a fury cancels the wedding.

The next morning, in a wonderful "The Day After" scene, Worf comes to Jadzia's quarters. I liked some of the dialog:

Dax: "You're mad."
Worf: "I am concerned."
Dax: "Yeah, well, I'm hung over."

But the formulaic manipulations engage at warp speed when Worf and Dax can't (immediately) come to terms over the problem that the conflict between Sirella and Dax represents. Worf is too traditional and serious; Dax is too fun-loving and unconventional. "There should be no wedding." "That's fine with me." Yadda, yadda, yadda. Fortunately, the scene is punctuated with a note of quiet, somber seriousness rather than histrionics and yelling. Dax and Worf both seem genuinely hurt by the way events have unfolded, and less caricaturish than the events could've potentially created—which is better than I expected.

But, still, this is pretty slight material. Subsequent dialog scenes feature each receiving a prodding from a close friend to give in a little and go through with the wedding. Sisko gives Dax a good kick in the rear, and Martok supplies Worf with some words of wisdom. A lot of the dialog is stiff and sounds "scripted." (Although, I did think Dax's line about "still leading with her heart after seven lifetimes" was interesting, especially considering how content she was to avoid romance in the first two seasons on the show.) What's amazing is that the dialog manages to work anyway, despite its hackneyed nature. I credit this to the actors, who do a wonderful job of believing what they're saying, helping make us believe it too. Again, it seems hard to go wrong with the Sisko/Dax and Worf/Martok relationships.

As for the actual wedding scene: I liked it quite a bit. The costumes were nice, the Klingon story was well conceived, and the music had an nice mythical aura about it. Ron Moore is the expert on Klingon milieu, and he delivers again here with a scene that has some poignancy.

There's not a whole lot more to say about "You Are Cordially Invited." It's definitely pleasant and diverting, and there are some good lightweight scenes. But there's not much meat to the story, and what "meat" there is comes packaged in a formulaic, predictable (though surprisingly palatable) plot. It's what I expected of a wedding show. Nothing more, nothing less. Suggestion of the week: Turn your brain off and relax.

Next week: Mirror, mirror on the wall: For how many Bareils will Kira fall?

Previous episode: Sacrifice of Angels
Next episode: Resurrection

Season Index

58 comments on this review

Paul - Thu, May 8, 2008 - 4:15pm (USA Central)
Would it have killed them to have brought back some of Worf's TNG buddies for his wedding?
Darmok - Thu, Sep 11, 2008 - 9:35am (USA Central)
They were too busy blowing their budget on the wedding dress and the Polynesian fire dancer.
R.D. - Thu, Nov 13, 2008 - 9:50am (USA Central)
Yeah, I could swear that at least Riker would qualify as one of Worf's "closest male friends," especially considering the TNG episodes "A Matter of Honor" and "Ethics," and Ronald D. Moore would have definitely been aware of this. I wonder if it was ever discussed but later vetoed for whatever reason.
Alec - Sat, Jan 31, 2009 - 8:31pm (USA Central)
That food that Miles and Julian were about to eat at Quark's looked awesome!
Jakob M. Mokoru - Wed, Feb 4, 2009 - 12:43pm (USA Central)
Well - as Jammer rightly stated: practically every "comical" wedding movie has basically the same plot twists as this episode. But I enjoyed the episode anyway - also because it was a welcome diversion from the war. Siskos log entry at the beginning of the episode was appealing for the same reason!

The ceremony itself was really well done and mythical with those drumbeats and the story of the Klingon Hearts.

And...yes, call me "juvenile" but I liked Jadzias Dress! ;o)
Aldo Johnson - Sat, Oct 17, 2009 - 10:30pm (USA Central)
Yes, this is definitely a light-weight episode, perhaps an episode to recuperate from the last 6 episodes.

For such lightweight fare, almost everything works. The actors did well. The Kira-Odo scene could've worked, but they ran out of time, I guess.

It makes sense for the TNG characters not to appear. After all, Worf abruptly changed the time and place of the wedding, and it being war time and all...

About Jadzia's dress; the first time I went "hubba-hubba" at a Star Trek character.
M.P. - Thu, Oct 29, 2009 - 7:32am (USA Central)
Was I the only person who was... off-put by Martok's fascination with Sisko's baseball at the beginning of the episode? It just jumped out and hit me with a sledgehammer. :/
J - Fri, Oct 30, 2009 - 11:10am (USA Central)
I was really impressed by the scene where Martok talks to Worf about being alone in his heart. I didn't find this dialogue hackneyed at all, and J.G. Hertzler has a tendency to steal scenes anyway, but really walked away with that one.

The singing was cool, too.
NoPoet - Wed, Dec 2, 2009 - 3:14pm (USA Central)
I never considered the TNG crew -- now that you come to mention it, it does seem odd they didn't make an appearance, but think about the logistical nightmare of having even a couple of Next Gen actors over.

Who would they bring over, cos no doubt Trek fans would be arguing about the validity of the choices for decades?

Who actually were Worf's closest friends? In my opinion, the TNG crew were nowhere near as well-developed as the characters in DS9, so picking a "best friend" would be anybody's guess.

Finally, the writers would actually have to write several characters from another show into a DS9 script and pay their wages. While this wouldn't bother me in the slightest -- I love Star Trek crossovers -- I can imagine it giving the DS9 creative team a bout of acid reflux.
Luke - Mon, Jan 4, 2010 - 1:04pm (USA Central)

"Who actually were Worf's closest friends? In my opinion, the TNG crew were nowhere near as well-developed as the characters in DS9, so picking a "best friend" would be anybody's guess."

I just hate it when people confuse TNG & Voyager like that.
NoPoet - Wed, Jan 6, 2010 - 3:33pm (USA Central)
You're right. I meant to say Voyager. Thanks Luke.
JP - Tue, Feb 23, 2010 - 3:09am (USA Central)
You could explain away the fact that no TNG cast were present by saying they logistically can't make it to DS9 due to the war/other assignement too far away.
Anthony2816 - Thu, Mar 4, 2010 - 3:02pm (USA Central)
Nobody has mentioned that the beat from the Klingon drummers in no way matched the beat on the soundtrack.

Meanwhile, perhaps all the TNG clue were drifting hopelessly in space after the last battle...
Anthony2816 - Thu, Mar 4, 2010 - 3:06pm (USA Central)
When, during the wedding ceremony, Worf's former wife refers to him as, "Worf, Son of Mogh...", isn't that incorrect? Isn't he now of the House of Martock(sp?) ?
RdV - Wed, Mar 24, 2010 - 3:06pm (USA Central)
There is an easier explanation for none of Worf's TNG friends being there for the wedding; it was quite suddenly moved up to allow Alexander (who would be leaving on a mission in a few days) to be present.

The wedding was never planned to take place that day and anyone not already on the station probably couldn't have made it there in time.
Nic - Sun, Jun 6, 2010 - 8:38pm (USA Central)
I have quite a few things to say about this episode. First, I was pleasantly surprised that they still mentioned that the war was going on in this episode. It's a nice touch that gives the show a more serialized feel.

Second, to answer the comments about the TNG crew, it seems they wanted to get the entire cast in non-speaking roles, but only Jonathan Frakes and LeVar Burton were available, so they nixed it. I sure would have liked at least Riker to appear.

Third, a word about Odo. You mentioned in last week's review that if Odo and Kira were friends again by this week, you wouldn't buy it. Well, that didn't happen, and I thought it was nice continuity to see it adressed. But the off-screen resolution is a little disappointing. You might want to check the Memory Alpha article for this episode to see the much more status-quo-shattering resolution that was originally planned.
NickM - Fri, Aug 13, 2010 - 8:31am (USA Central)
I agree about TNG crew at least being mentioned, and Riker is my favorite character from TNG, but Picard would have been an even more obvious choice. After everything with the Duras family, the Klingon civil war and his acting as Worf's Cha'DIch, the respect there is deep - on both sides. A voice only apology from Picard to Worf saying the Enterprise could not make it would have bee enough.
Milstead - Sun, Nov 14, 2010 - 11:49am (USA Central)
Okay, I'm really nitpicking here, but if Odo didn't leave Dax's quarters until 10:30am, how long had he been holding his shape for? He was on duty before he arrived at the party.

Just saying.
Ospero - Wed, Dec 22, 2010 - 3:46am (USA Central)
Just to throw in a quick comment about the never-seen talk between Kira and Odo in the wardrobe (or whatever that room was): While never seen on screen, it was put to paper in "Worlds of Star Trek Deep Space Nine" Part Three: Ferenginar and The Dominion. Even if you don't care about the relaunch books, the Dominion part is worth it for the Kira/Odo sequences alone.
Jay - Fri, Feb 11, 2011 - 6:39pm (USA Central)
Having TNG guys on the episode probably would have upstaged the new DS9 buds. Riker might have worked, but Picard would hav ebeen a bit more awkward, and having TNG there would almost demand some mention of the best left behind Worf-Troi stuff.
Alina - Tue, Mar 20, 2012 - 8:43pm (USA Central)
I love that episode. I've always found Worf and Jadzia's chemistry to be very evident and their love deep and moving. In my opinion they were the best star trek couple along with Troi and Riker, Picard and Beverly and Paris and B'Elanna.
Jade - Fri, Mar 23, 2012 - 9:05pm (USA Central)
Worf and Jadzia belonged together. Period. Stupid writers!
Justin - Sun, Apr 15, 2012 - 11:57am (USA Central)
@Jade, it was Terry Farrell's decision to leave the show.
Jay - Tue, Apr 17, 2012 - 2:21pm (USA Central)
Yeah, she left to do "Becker", which was really a rather annoying show.

It's funny that she was erased from time Krenim style in the finale...she was totally absent from the montages.
Jade - Wed, Apr 25, 2012 - 8:07pm (USA Central)
@ justin, yes I know that but she asked the writers not to kill her character and she said that she would come back as a recurring character. They were so many ways to deal with her absence during the last season : there was a war and she could be needed in another post, she could have been injured and travel to Trill to recover or she could be missing in action and Worf could later find her during the last arc. Anyway, I think Jadzia and Worf belong together and that the writers built their relationship so beautifully only to destroy everything in the end. Not to mention that Worf already lost his first mate (and he lost so much along the way) and he deversed a happy ending maybe more than any other character. At least we don't have only one universe in Star Trek (Star Trek 2009) so maybe in another timeline they're happy together.
Sophie - Sun, Apr 29, 2012 - 6:05pm (USA Central)
Great episode, one of my many many faves in season 6. Worf and Dax are awesome together and their wedding is absolutelly fantastic. Jammer I couldn't disagree with you more, I usually don't care about romance in sci-fi series but the chemistry between Worf and Jadzia is amazing. Since "The way of the Warrior" I've always thought that they should get together. They were very convincing as a couple and they seemed deeply in love. Having TNG cast would be great
Nora - Sat, May 5, 2012 - 2:58pm (USA Central)
I disagree with this review, Jadzia and Worf are one of the most passionate couples in Star Trek and the actors have such a great chemistry. The writers dropped the ball by killing her.
Jack - Thu, Jun 14, 2012 - 3:00pm (USA Central)
Hard to buy all of these rituals Worf says must take place when in TNG's "The Emissary" he said like one sentence and then claimed he and Key'lehr were married...without even asking her.
Chloe - Sun, Jun 17, 2012 - 11:53am (USA Central)
Are you kidding? No chemistry? Worf and Dax had the best chemistry than any other Trek couple!
Elliott - Sun, Jun 17, 2012 - 3:55pm (USA Central)
@Chloe :

Tom/B'Ellana > Troi/Riker > Odo/Kira > Worf/Jadzia > T'pol/Trip > 7/Chakotay
Chloe - Sun, Jun 17, 2012 - 5:01pm (USA Central)
@Elliott
In my opinion is: Worf/Jadzia > Troi/Riker > Tom/B'Elanna > Beverly/Picard > Seven/The Doctor > Janeway/Chacotay > Kira/Odo.


Ican't comment on Trip/T'Pol as I haven't watch all of Enterprise yet
Maria - Sun, Jun 17, 2012 - 6:46pm (USA Central)
For me it's Deanna and Will tied with Worf and Jadzia in the first place and followed by Picard and Beverly.
Back to the episode: it's one of my favorites in the series, only way to make it better would be if the Enterprise crew were present but I understand why that didn't happened.
A trekker - Sat, Jun 23, 2012 - 8:22pm (USA Central)
A fun and heart-warming episode, a much needed after the six episode arc. The Klingon wedding ceremony was beautiful and Jadzia was radiant in her wedding dress.
Elliott - Sat, Jun 30, 2012 - 9:29pm (USA Central)
The only reason people seem to think Jadzia and Worf have chemistry is because she "gets" Klingons. That's pretty damned racist and reduces Worf's character down to a snivelling stereotype. If Jadzia had chemistry with anyone it was Sisko. It would have made her stupid death scene somewhat more tempered if they had had the courage to pair them together. Worf's character demands he be extremely loyal and devout in his romantic dealings. That's why his relationship with K'Ehlar was so powerful, even though we saw her only twice. Then of course the awful season 6 of TNG came along and suddenly, Worf's everlasting devotion to the mother of his child is thrown out because they can't figure out what to do with him. So, sure, have him sleep with that half Romulan girl, and Troi and then Jadzia and then Ezri.

Anyway, couple that with the fact that Farrel and Dorn cannot, by any stretch, act effective romance and you've got a pretty boring couple.

I'd also like to know how Crusher/Picard can be considered a Trek couple. They were romantically involved in exactly two episodes and one scene of one bad movie. Then Picard went off with that Amish woman. Chokotay and Janeway? They were never a couple. Doc and Seven? What? Crushes are not relationships.

I'll tell you a relationship I wanted to see : Garek and Bashir.
Chloe - Sun, Jul 1, 2012 - 5:36pm (USA Central)

I don't think that the only reason people like Worf and Jadzia together is because she gets Klingons. Personally, I believe that they're a passionate couple who were very deeply in love.

Pairinig Worf and Jadzia together was not planned from the beginning it came up when the writers saw the actors acting together which means that other people saw their on screen chemistry as well(s4 dvd extras).

Michael Dorn in a convention last month in the question of which series did he prefer TNG or DS9 he said that he loved TNG and it's still his favorite series overall and he enjoyed his time there more but he's more proud of Worf's love story with Jadzia in DS9.

But different people have different tastes and that the beauty of life.
Irini - Wed, Jul 25, 2012 - 7:16pm (USA Central)

If there is one character in Star Trek that doesn’t see the other characters as stereotypes of their races then that character is Jadzia. Seriously, Jadzia sees and accepts the individuals for what they are, not what race they are from.
She’s the character who can look beyond cultural differences and a person’s appearance and that’s why she’s friends with so many of the other characters. She sees Kira as Kira and not as another Bajoran, she sees Quark as Quark and not as another Feregi, she sees Julian as Julian and not as another human or later an enchased human.
Yes Jadzia understands the Klingon culture and maybe that is what in the beginning brings her close to Worf and they become friends but in my opinion she understands who Worf really is. It is Worf who understands and loves not another Klingon (and let’s not forget that Worf is not the typical Klingon)
And yes I believe the two actors act wonderfully around each other and they have a thick chemistry.
Arachnea - Mon, Nov 26, 2012 - 10:16pm (USA Central)
I agree with Irini, though I always regretted the death of K'ehleyr because the writers had in hand a potentially powerful couple. She had humour, charisma and the actress was good.

The Jadzia/Worf lovestory didn't disturb me though. But there were missed opportunities to make Work grow as a character: the enthusiasm of Jadzia and the mentoring of the great Martok.

What disturbed me is the fact that Odo's betrayal hasn't been revealed to the rest of the crew (cf. Dax/Kira scene in the beginning). And how Jake - who was part of the resistance cell - can ask Kira why Odo is avoiding her. I would have liked to see a Sisko/Odo debriefing before letting the compromised Odo return to duty.

On a light note, I will also vote for the couples:
Worf/K'ehleyr > Tom/B'elanna - Trip/T'Pol (if you delete the vulcan pressure thing from memory) > Troi/Riker > Jadzia/Worf > Sisko/Kasidy (and Picard/Eline ;-)).
DG - Wed, Dec 5, 2012 - 6:55am (USA Central)
@Elliot: Garak and Bashir! Most beautiful almost-couple EVER. They were natural, begging for it like crazy... Garak and Ziyal was cringeworthy.
Wish I knew which episode it was, but they had and awesome 'getting crap past radar' conversation.

That bit on the Jadzia "gets" Klingons makes a LOT of sense. It's like how Mormon Missionaries around here marry immigrants from countries they went to. For them, they get hot, exotic women. For the women, they get someone that speaks their language. If you ask *them*, they say they're in love, but it hinges more on that same type of "I get you" feeling.

You're right on the Crusher/Picard relationship, but I have a hard time not seeing a Crusher/Picard "relationship" because they (seriously... it's creepy) look like my parents. My Mom has similar hair and a similar build to Crusher. My Dad..., well, I tell people my Dad is Clark Kent to Picard's Superman. Ya know Picard's alias Galen--that's my Dad's name...


@ Everyone else: I wish weddings in RL were as cool as Klingon weddings. The weddings I've been to are BORING!
Cail Corishev - Tue, Dec 18, 2012 - 10:37am (USA Central)
My problem with the episode is that it did too good a job of convincing me that Worf and Dax shouldn't get married. Worf is far too jealous and insecure to marry a woman who thinks it's okay to be rubbing up on a half-naked hunk the night before her wedding.

And that's just the most obvious incompatibility. Worf's whole thing is that he wants life to be predictable and make sense from his perspective. He's not into nuance and tolerance for opposing viewpoints. That's why he's so into Klingon tradition, despite not growing up with it -- it makes things simple and clear: do this, don't do that, follow the rules and you're good. Yet suddenly he's signing on for a lifetime of wondering what his wife is going to do next to freak him out.

Dax's previous lifetimes only makes it worse, because he's not just marrying a woman who's much less inhibited than him and has had exponentially more and longer relationships, but has had half of them as a man. That's a level of weirdness that should send a guy like Worf running for the hills.

Yes, Jadzia is very hot, and maybe the chemistry and the sex are great. But beyond that, what's Worf getting out of it except drama and stress?
William - Wed, Dec 19, 2012 - 7:43pm (USA Central)
If for nothing else, I like the episode for the party in Dax's quarters -- especially that funky dance she and Nog were doing.

I have to say, the Ferengis are damn fun at parties.
Herman - Thu, Jan 31, 2013 - 5:21pm (USA Central)
I had to LOL quite a few times during this episode, doesn't happen often with Star Trek. It was just full of silly fun. Bashir and O'Brien are a great comedic couple, especially O'Brien cracks me up every time with his dry remarks, even though his 'simple engineer' role is a bit stereotypical. Colm Meaney is quite the actor if that wasn't clear by now.
HawgWyld - Mon, Jun 3, 2013 - 1:35pm (USA Central)
I'm going through all the DS9 episodes again on Netflix. I forgot how much I hated this one. Good thing about Netflix -- one can skip right over it and not miss a beat. Awesome.
Paul - Tue, Jun 4, 2013 - 12:40pm (USA Central)
@HawgWyld: This episode is pretty bad. But it really suffers because it's the first episode after the Federation retakes DS9 and after the very strong first six episodes (other than 'Sons and Daughters').

For whatever reason, the creators of DS9 occasionally sprinkled in "break" episodes at the worst times. 'Take Me Out to the Holosuite' and the other holosuite episode in season 7 (where Avery Brooks sings) are other examples.

I saw a recent story on all the ST series that said DS9 was the most daring series but that it suffered because it was produced during the transition to more serialized TV. I think that's exactly on the mark, and episodes like "You Are Cordially Invited" are perfect examples of the whiplash we sometimes got from this series.
Elnis - Mon, Aug 26, 2013 - 12:23am (USA Central)
To me, this was the funniest episode of DS9 so far.

While the plot left me with a shrug, many of the lines are absolutely brilliant comedy!

My favorite part was probably Bashir and O'Brien, hanging over a fiery pit, talking about how they're gonna kill Worf. Tacky, sure, but well written and well performed!

Oh, and I wish I'd been invited to Jadzia's party .. man, that looked like fun!
ZurielSeven - Thu, Aug 29, 2013 - 10:07am (USA Central)
To all the people complaining about the "Enterprise not showing up"... the Enterprise was destroyed prior to DS9 Season 4 and its likely that the crew was transferred/reassigned/on leave. Not to mention the amount of time it takes for the new Enterprise-E to be commissioned, built, tuned & balanced, christened, etc...
William B - Thu, Aug 29, 2013 - 12:43pm (USA Central)
Actually, "You Are Cordially Invited" took place after First Contact, so the Enterprise-E is doing perfectly well.

I don't think "why didn't the Enterprise show up?" is any kind of mystery, though. There's a war on. I'm sure we can all imagine Picard, Riker and Troi (and perhaps Data, Crusher and La Forge) sending voice congratulations. Kor was friends with *both* Jadzia and Worf and didn't show. Because people are busy in a war. (This also justifies Worf showing up to the Riker/Troi wedding in Nemesis, since there wasn't a war on there.)
Paul - Thu, Aug 29, 2013 - 4:24pm (USA Central)
@William B: That's all true. Also, remember that they had to rush through the wedding in just a few days so Alexander could attend. That probably would have made it rough for the Enterprise crew to show up on such short notice.

My only qualm with the way it played out was that Bashir -- who wasn't particularly close to Worf -- was included in the Klingon bachelor party. Everybody else there made sense. But Bashir was clearly just there to be funny with O'Brien.

It is too bad that Garak wasn't involved somehow in this episode, perhaps in making Jadzia's wedding dress. Seems like a perfect episode for that.
Kotas - Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 8:56pm (USA Central)

Passable wedding episode.

5/10
Jack - Fri, Dec 20, 2013 - 1:41am (USA Central)
Rather obnoxious of Sisko to try and have it both ways...one moment he is telling Jadzia that she isn't Curzon and can't claim credit for his achievements, but then the very next moment is saying that she is 356 years old and should act like it.
Vylora - Wed, May 7, 2014 - 12:34am (USA Central)
Jack:

Sisko wasn't trying to have it both ways. It's all about understanding the context of what's being said. Telling Jadzia to quit specifically crediting her past accomplishments as Curzon is different than telling Jadzia to utilize the overall wisdom and experience in general of her past lives. Forest for the trees. She's justifying herself by specific accomplishments of one host that pertains to her current situation rather than utilizing the overall experience she's gained over the centuries.

---------------------

I've always really enjoyed this episode and whenever I've re-watched the series, this one is included. I don't know if it's the lightweight nature of it that's needed after the preceding arc of episodes or if it's really that good of an episode. So disregarding said arc, I will think of the episode on its own terms.

I've never found the charisma between Jadzia and Worf to be anything but what the story needed and it has always worked for me. A lot of it seemed believable enough and I just viewed it as that's their relationship and that's just how they interact. Unlike, say, the charisma between Foreman and Thirteen on House MD. I liked the idea of them together but more than one too many scenes fell a bit flat. In Jadzia/Worf's case also I noticed that in a few comments (earlier episodes) on here the relationship itself came out of nowhere. That's far from true and it was hinted at several times since Worf's arrival on DS9.

I'm still of the belief that ST hasn't done romance well in general, but there are romantic episodes that HAVE been done well. Quite well in fact. Unfortunately, it's been tried too many times and, even more unfortunately, in too many bottle episodes. Ones where the romance's birth and death hinge on what can be encapsulated in one hour. Not saying that it's never worked at all but that the percentages are not in favor.

Budding romances between major characters, however, is a different thing and is also an area where the ball has been dropped one too many times. Crusher and Picard, for instance, was a fantastic idea where the ball was dropped with an unceremonious thud.

All in all, though, this episode was rather enjoyable. Jammer hit the nail on the head when he said basically that it's not a must-see but don't necessarily miss it, either. The only mistake in this episode, and it's a glaring mistake, was to have the off-screen talk between Kira and Odo. That talk most definitely should have been a major part of a different episode and most definitely NOT something that would have simply been alluded to. I really can't fault the whole episode for it since it's not intrinsic to the plot. But even that minor scene was disheartening and disappointing because of the knowledge of it's reason for being there.

It be what it be. Fun to watch episode with plenty of grin-worthy dialogue despite some pedestrian 'seen-it-all-before' wedding fluff.

Just squeaks by into 3 stars for me.
Rivus - Mon, May 12, 2014 - 6:43pm (USA Central)
A lot of disappointment to this episode, though it was saved by O'Brien/Bashir (KILL WORF) and Martok (by far my favorite Klingon). While the disappointment is all too expected (whenever Trek does interpersonal relationships on this level, it's always rife with enough cliches to make my head spin), I agree with Paul that these always come around at seemingly the worst times. Stuff actually relevant to the plot gets shoved to the side (Kira/Odo quite literally), and there isn't even a line referring to Ziyal, whose death was already anticlimactic to begin with aside from Dukat's spiraling. Guess Kira got over THAT one real quick. I mean, so did Garak, but seeing how he dealt with his own father, it's very much in-character, even if there's some underlying emotion he doesn't bring to the surface.

And then there's Jadzia, who has been through five marriages, and yet can't seem to grasp what marrying even entails...

I'd say 2 stars, with reservations... It's not terrible, but after everything that's happened, you'd think MAYBE there could have been less boring fodder for the writers to tap into.
Jonathan - Sun, Jun 1, 2014 - 5:22pm (USA Central)
"How hollow is the sound of victory, without someone to share it with? Honor gives little comfort to a man alone in his home, and in his heart."

The two scenes with Martok and Sisko are wonderfully acted, and for me, brings this episode up to 3 stars.
Jonathan - Sun, Jun 1, 2014 - 5:28pm (USA Central)
Also, scenes like that provide character development that just isn't found in as much depth in TNG (outside of Picard).
Yanks - Mon, Aug 18, 2014 - 11:30am (USA Central)
Jonathon,

Completely agree regarding Martok/Sisko!

Shannon Cochran played a very good Klingon "goddess".

Again, Martok has GREAT lines and delivers them without skipping a beat :-)

"MARTOK: I shall endeavor to die this year, if possible." ... to be followed by "Isn't she magnificent" :-)

I really enjoyed the wedding when they finally got there. The best part I thought was Sirella's line:

SIRELLA: And when the two hearts began to beat together, they filled the heavens with a terrible sound. For the first time, the gods knew fear. They tried to flee, but it was too late. The Klingon hearts destroyed the gods who created them and turned the heavens to ashes. To this very day, no one can oppose the beating of two Klingon hearts. Not even me. Worf, son of Mogh, does your heart beat only for this woman?

When she said "not even me" I choked up. I know, I'm a sap :)

I also liked Sisko not copping out to Jadzia's woes (like he normally does). He put her in her place quite appropriately!

I’ll go a little higher than Jammer. 3 stars for me.
Worf - Sun, Aug 31, 2014 - 2:39am (USA Central)
I feel like the only reason Jadzia got with Worf was because he is klingon. It always annoyed me how Jadzia seemed to want to be a klingon. Just because Curon worked with Klingons she knows all their rituals, songs and beliefs. I never felt any chemistry between them. I was glad they killed her when she quit the show. I know she offered to do part time work the last season but I'm sure the writers felt like if she was gonna leave them with one season left then Jadzia had to die. Ha. And what's with worf thinking she will be in stovokor. She isn't klingon and shouldn't his woman from tng be waiting for him.
msw188 - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 - 7:04pm (USA Central)
Some friends of mine are watching through DS9. I tried joining them one night a while ago, and one of the episodes I caught was Meridian. I didn't return until the other night, when I caught this episode and the next one.

I'm sorry folks, but this episode is pretty bad. There are a couple of good things I can say:
1. Bashir (since when is he Worf's choice for a ceremony like this?) and O'Brien are awesome. Meaney is as good as ever in the role.
2. Some of Martok's lines, while still a bit too cheesy to really resonate with me, have some worthwhile stuff to say.

But the bad far outweighs the good here:
1. Alexander is here.
2. Worf and Jadzia don't seem to be a particularly good couple.
3. The crew is inept - how do things get done when security officers join parties, and/or miss their shifts?
4. I still don't like Brooks' acting.
5. The most potentially interesting scenes are kept offscreen:
5a) Odo and Kira
5b) Jadzia's final meeting with the Klingon lady
5c) O'Brien and Bashir attacking Worf

I could probably go on, but I'm sure anyone reading this gets the idea. Contrast this bullshit with the O'Brien wedding (Data's Day). For one thing, it wasn't the entire focus of the episode. For another, even not knowing Keiko at all before that, there was a definite feeling of wanting the wedding to succeed. I'm not certain that Worf+Jadzia will be good for either of them, so I can't decide if I want this wedding to succeed or not. Also, the TNG episode gave us the single best Data-face ever. It's a bit unfair to use that in a comparison with this episode, but I'm doing it anyways.

Maybe most importantly, the predictability of the standard 'wedding-drama' is used playfully in Data's Day - Geordi has to make it clear to Data that, despite Keiko's protestations, Data should be ready to proceed with the wedding. After all, that's how these scripts play out. The script has a tongue-in-cheek feel that makes it fun even if it's unsurprising at the end. Meanwhile, this script's predictability just makes it dull.
zzybaloobah - Sun, Sep 21, 2014 - 10:15pm (USA Central)
I'm surprised so few commented on Alexander. He is *painful* to watch. He's over-the-top inept; and worse, he seems OK with it. Maybe a human could be content to be the fool, but a Klingon warrior?
He needs to stumble into a heroic death, and quickly....
$G - Thu, Sep 25, 2014 - 12:19pm (USA Central)
I wish the Odo-Kira fallout had been shown too. Memory Alpha says the initial plan was to have Odo isolate himself from the crew outside of work situations. But without being able to see where it would lead, the writers didn't want to paint Odo's character into a corner.

Anyway, it's a silly episode that mostly works even with all the cliches. It's just fun to wind down with the crew after the heavy storylines they just survived. Dax's party is a lot of fun, and I liked how Kira and Odo talked all night in private. It was basically a college party. Dax and Nog should get down more often.

Guilty pleasure, so 3 stars.

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