Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

"Behind the Lines"

***

Air date: 10/20/1997
Written by Rene Echevarria
Directed by LeVar Burton

Review by Jamahl Epsicokhan

"I was in the Link."
"Are you saying you forgot?!"
"I didn't forget. It just ... didn't seem to matter."

— Odo and Kira, discussing the botched resistance plan

Note: This episode was rerated from 3.5 to 3 stars when the season recap was written.

Nutshell: A solid installment with a very brave twist at the end. I don't know how the writers are going to get themselves out of this one, but I'm definitely interested in finding out.

The writers just keep getting themselves in deeper and deeper. How are they going to resolve the mess they've created in a mere four episodes (that's counting "Call to Arms" and not "Sons and Daughters" since the latter was an episode that offered little into the sweeping arc) in a manner that is both plausible and dramatically satisfying? Presumably, we're going to have at least some of it put to rest in the next two episodes, so my question is "how?" We shall certainly see.

In "Behind the Lines," we get some compelling follow-up to Kira's decision from "Rocks and Shoals" to begin a resistance effort and start causing some station-side trouble. The episode opens with a big fight in Quark's that erupts between the Cardassians and Jem'Hadar. It was Kira's and Rom's doing; they stole Damar's padd and left it outside a Jem'Hadar soldier's quarters. The padd contained an "inflammatory document" that angered the Jem'Hadar; the resulting melee in Quark's leads to a number of Cardassian and Jem'Hadar deaths.

The idea of Kira and Rom encouraging dissension from within the ranks of this uneasy alliance is a very appropriate one. I've long believed that the gaps in the alliance could be exploited to its detriment, so Kira's plan certainly makes a lot of sense. The funny part is how Dukat and Weyoun have to put aside their own differences to keep control of their respective troops. "Smile, Dukat. Our men need to see that we're still allies," Weyoun whispers to him.

Similarly, I also enjoyed seeing the operations of Kira's resistance cell—one of utter simplicity with the odds decidedly against its success: Four people (Kira, Odo, Jake, and Rom) sitting around Kira's quarters discussing any possible way of undermining Dominion plans. When someone knocks on Kira's door, the sense of uneasiness is crystal clear. The key word here is "covert"; lay low or surely be exposed.

Then there's the interesting, not-so-neutral role of Quark, the friendly barkeep who keeps his ears open. Particularly believable was his pumping of Dukat's right hand Damar (Casey Biggs) for information, and his successful attempt at getting the information out of him by drinking some of the hard stuff with him. (As Worf once said, "You cannot loosen a man's tongue with root beer." Now, kanaar on the other hand...)

When Quark shows up to Kira's resistance meeting drunk—and with crucial information that Damar has a plan for deactivating the minefield—we see a barkeep who is genuinely sick of the occupation. He had become too accustomed to the Federation presence, and he wants it back. He doesn't like the Cardassians anymore ("They're mean and arrogant") and he can't stand the Jem'Hadar (for obvious reasons). It's refreshing to see Quark take a side, and since he's generally regarded as neutral by the Cardassians, this could be something that works in the favor of Kira's resistance efforts.

On the other hand, just as Quark finally seems to be coming around into usefulness, "Behind the Lines" also documents Kira losing her grips on a person much more vital to her cause—namely Odo, who finds his priorities completely shattered when the troublesome Female Changeling (Salome Jens) comes to Odo to offer her insight into the Great Link so that Odo might learn more about himself.

We all know this shapeshifter. Nearly every time she shows up it spells trouble for Odo. This time she reveals that she is trapped in the Alpha Quadrant because of the minefield. She has come to Odo to tell him he has been forgiven for his killing of another Changeling, and that he can still return to the Great Link if he so desires.

One minor qualm I have is that the opening scene between Odo and the Female Founder feels a little too much like deja vu. We've heard some of this dialog several times before—where she tries to convince him that he should return to the Great Link, that he doesn't belong with "solids," and so forth. If this didn't ultimately work so well in terms of the story, I'd wonder if it weren't written for the benefit of people who hadn't seen season three.

On the other hand, it definitely stands to reason that the Female Changeling would come Odo under the given circumstances. If she has truly been trapped in the Alpha Quadrant for the past four months, her explanation that she "wants to be with one of her own" is very plausible given what the story tells us about a Changeling's need for a sense of completeness and fulfillment that the Great Link provides. The Female Changeling's offer to help Odo learn about himself is a genuine one—but the Founders are crafty people. If they can manipulate Odo to the Dominion's own self-serving ends while simultaneously helping him return to the Great Link, all the better.

Odo's decision to allow her to link with him is one made out of desperation from another issue: He needs to find some peace, for he is too distracted by his feelings for Kira that his thought processes are constantly affected. He admits that it's absurd, but he can't control his feelings. The other shapeshifter offers him "clarity." Under the circumstances Odo's decision takes a very dangerous road, but the beauty of it is how unavoidable it seems. He's simply too vulnerable to make the better choice.

To say Kira is worried would be an understatement. When she finds out Odo has linked with the other shapeshifter she's angry and extremely frustrated. I've said before that Nana Visitor projects emotion onto the screen as good as or better than any actor I've seen, and her performance here is further proof of that. Kira can't finish her sentences as she realizes what the implications of Odo's actions are. She makes Odo promise not to do it again—too much is at stake right now for her to risk him not being completely focused. But by this point I was already suspecting that it was too late; Odo's speech and demeanor had already considerably changed, and his own naivete that he would be able to control this volatile situation he had created was the one mistake that would lead him down his one-way path.

But, because Kira has known and trusted Odo for so many years, she trusts him one more time despite his distractions. What choice does she have? When Odo says "I promise," you take him for his word; he's one of the most honorable characters around.

The problem with Odo is that he has so many Achilles heels. His feelings for Kira have already affected him. Add that to his species' inherent nature to return to the Great Link and the presence of another Changeling who is certainly capable and intending to manipulate him, and we have the makings of serious trouble. We've seen before that Odo is capable of making decisions that may not be in the best interests of everybody but may be in the best interests of himself (the future Odo in "Children of Time" comes to mind). That's why Echevarria's script for "Behind the Lines" is so good. As the plot advances, the dramatic irony becomes clear. By the time Quark reveals to Kira that the minefield is on the verge of coming down, Odo has shown more interest in finding out how many shapeshifters are in the Great Link than he has in thinking about ways of thwarting Damar's plans. Sure, Odo has moments where he is actively involved in the resistance planning—he volunteers to disable the security alarms long enough for Rom to go into a secured area of the station and alter some tech stuff crucial to Damar's plan—but for the most part Odo's mind is already on the other side of the wormhole ready to join the Link.

The effectiveness of the story's dramatic irony I attribute to Rene Auberjonois' striking change in the way he performs Odo. Before linking he's the Odo we know—aggressive, passionate, and forceful when he speaks his mind. But after linking he is reserved, indifferent, and quiet. He just doesn't seem to care, because his life has suddenly gone in a new direction. This new direction is interesting in itself, as it toys with the possibilities of the Changelings' existence. ("The drop becomes the ocean, and the ocean the drop."; "How many of us are there?" "One and many; it depends on how you look at it.") Herein, one also wonders to what degree the Founders are individuals, and to what degree they're a collective (providing still another way of analyzing the Dominion in terms of the Borg).

The final act is a chilling winner that leaves us hanging for another week. Odo breaks his promise and links again, just at the time when he should be disabling the alarm according to the set plan. As a result, Rom is captured trying to undermine Damar's plan and subsequently thrown in a holding cell. The minefield will now almost certainly come down. People are going to die. Kira is furious. When she confronts Odo, he simply and calmly tells her "I was in the Link. It just ... didn't seem to matter." He doesn't expect her to understand—and it's a good thing, because she sure doesn't.

This is a brave ending, because it takes some real chances. Not only does it bury the Federation's chances in the war even deeper under apparent hopelessness, it completely changes Odo's attitudes and his relationship with Kira. What's more, Odo doesn't even seem to care about what he has caused by his inaction; he now sees it as "none of his concern," because he is a Changeling—understanding his own people more and "solids" less. I don't see how Kira could ever trust Odo again. I wouldn't.

Now for a brief comment on the B-plot, which was also pretty strong: Sisko being taken off the front line and being assigned to a desk job in charge of an entire tactical wing is a prudent idea. His knowledge of the Dominion certainly makes him qualified to make these tactical decisions, and it also highlights the bond between Sisko and the crew of the Defiant, which he must sever in the interests of larger duties. These are the little details that make this war arc truly epic in scope.

What happens next? How can Kira continue without Odo, and how will Odo end up back on our side? How will anybody trust him again?

That's why they say "Tune in next week..."

Next week: It's a time to stand when Sisko decides he wants his station back.

Previous episode: Sons and Daughters
Next episode: Favor the Bold

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28 comments on this review

Anthony2816
Sun, Apr 27, 2008, 2:41am (UTC -6)
Plot-wise, it makes no sense for the female changling to look like Odo.
Blue
Sun, Mar 22, 2009, 5:01am (UTC -6)
It sorta does, Anthony. She wants to make Odo feel a similarity between them, so she takes on his style of humanoid. She wants to present a consistent "face" so she maintains this form for the solids, too.

I thought this was a very nice episode, and deserving at least 3.5 stars. Hit a lot of great notes, such as Sisko's usefulness as strategist --> REMF (rear echelon mother-frakker), Quark, Kira and Rom's dissension plan, Kira & Odo. It just felt right. That said, I thought Dax repeating Sisko's speech was really heavy-handed, glaringly so. On the whole, though, another great war ep.
Nic
Mon, May 31, 2010, 8:34am (UTC -6)
Although I enjoyed Sisko's B-story, I don't think it's believable that they would put him in charge of a tactical wing. Yes, he has had the most contact with the Dominion, but I'm sure that there have been Starfleet military and tactical experts that have spent the last three years analyzing Sisko's reports and sensor readings etc. Those people would be more qualified than Sisko is. The Federation is VERY, VERY big, people.
It also would've been fun to see Dax's first mission as captain of the Defiant, there was so much potential there that wasn't exploited.
Nebula Nox
Fri, Mar 30, 2012, 5:53am (UTC -6)
I agree with Blue that having the Female Changeling's face similar to Odo's is helpful. Obviously, it helps viewers identify them as the same species. But as Odo's face and features are the ones he is able to create, perhaps they are closest to his natural state? After all, at one point long ago, the shapeshifters were solid too.
Justin
Wed, Apr 11, 2012, 1:36pm (UTC -6)
One can speculate that the Odo-ish appearance of the changelings is the easiest, most comfortable, and least taxing humanoid form they can take.
Paul York
Sun, Jun 3, 2012, 9:41pm (UTC -6)
Odo is a complex character, both appealing and abhorrent at the same time, because he is vulnerable, believes in justice, is honest to a fault, etc. and then is able to make decisions that seem highly immoral (Children of Time, this episode), where people die because of his indifferent to humanoid life. He is a tragic character, torn between his desire for justice, on one hand, and his emotions, on the other. We see him emotionally all over the place with Dr. Mora, with the baby Changeling, with Kira (most often), and with his ambivalent relationship with the Great Link -- and the women he fell in love with as well in some other episode. I think he is the most fascinating character in DS9, except for Sisko, whose connection with the Prophets is profound and mysterious, and Quark, who wrestles with himself morally on many occasions (Business As Usual, and in this episode) but always choose goodness over profit, when it is one or the other.
Paul York
Sun, Jun 3, 2012, 9:47pm (UTC -6)
I should add that Garek and Dukat are also fascinating characters, for the same reasons: they are torn between two worlds, and within themselves. Garek, as an exile, is torn, and Dukat is torn by his love for his daughter and within himself, but in a strange way: he believes he should have been more of a totalitarian. Hitler had the same issue: he reproached himself for not being more ruthless, like Stalin. Hitler and Dukat both saw their good sides as weakness and hated that side of their own natures. This is what makes Dukat a tragic character as well -- because we know he has some goodness in him, but it is so hopelessly buried in hatred and lust for power, it never emerges, except briefly. Martok is also a very memorable character. After watching all the Treks now, I have to say that DS9 is my new fave -- though they all have their strengths.
John
Fri, Sep 21, 2012, 10:42pm (UTC -6)
I love angry Kira.
Kotas
Sun, Oct 27, 2013, 11:08am (UTC -6)

A good episode overall.

6/10
Vylora
Tue, May 6, 2014, 6:14pm (UTC -6)
I always saw this as a very well-written continuation of the arc and further proves that ST can handle both episodic and serialized storytelling. Nothing here really stood out as amazing, just really good stuff.

High end of 3.
Yanks
Mon, Aug 18, 2014, 9:31am (UTC -6)
Rene Auberjonois' continues to impress with his multi-leveled performance of Odo.

But man, this should result in him not serving or at least he should receive no trust going forward.

...or, you could look at it like he's drunk and it's only a problem with the female changeling is around.

3 star for me.
Robert
Mon, Aug 18, 2014, 10:05am (UTC -6)
I love Odo's character, and you could look at it like mind control (I mean, the link is only a few steps away from the Borg and we don't blame Picard for Locutus' actions) but something about that really bothered me too.

It would have been really, really bold to just continue having scenes with the bad guys (Weyoun/Damar/Female Changeling) on Cardassia and have Odo join them for awhile (like 5-10 episodes) and do a really slow burn of his "awakening" back to the realization that what he did was awful.

When you combine this sudden wake up (triggered by Kira's impending demise) and Laas' comment that he'd have gone back to the link if it wasn't for Kira it shades Odo's character way too darkly.

I mean, it's great that he's willing to do ANYTHING for love (kill the colony in Children of Time, resist the urge to join his people at the expense of the entire Federation, etc) but I have to hope that Laas' statement means something slightly other than the obvious because otherwise you're literally in a situation where if Kira died in the middle of the war Odo is on the next stolen runabout back to the Dominion....
DLPB
Tue, Aug 26, 2014, 11:54am (UTC -6)
My problem with this episode, and with all of this arc is that the Cardassians, Chaneglings, Vorta and otherwise would not allow Kira to remain free on the station. Or Rom. Or Jake. They would all be arrested. Kira would likely be executed, and Jake would be used as a hostage.

The writers just decide to throw out logic.
Robert
Tue, Aug 26, 2014, 1:02pm (UTC -6)
@DLPB - The Dominion wants good press, so to speak. If they could actually win Bajor over (and remember, Bajor is not a Federation planet) it'd be seriously good press for them not being evil conquerors.
M.P.
Thu, Sep 11, 2014, 1:03am (UTC -6)
I thought taking Sisko off the front lines made all the sense in the world. This is the first time (that we know of) the Federation has been on the losing side of a full-scale war. They would value people like him with real tactical and strategic experience and would make use of that.

To the person above who said the Federation is a very big place: that just further supports the point.

1) The single tactical wing Sisko is now planning for is just one of many. With how large the Federation is, it could be one of dozens.

and also important:

2) Sisko isn't in charge of this tactical wing. He is an advisor to Admiral Ross who is truly in charge and has all final say. It is stated several times in dialogue that they work together in the planning (Sisko only plans one mission solo but still needs approval. The rest is stated to be a joint effort.)
zzybaloobah
Mon, Sep 15, 2014, 3:43am (UTC -6)
Did anyone else have problems with putting Dax in command? AFAIK, she's never held a command. Now she's in command of one of the Federation's most powerful warships, on a critical high-priority mission? You don't give missions like that to brand new captains.....

Loved the interplay between Rom, Kira, and Odo....
$G
Tue, Sep 23, 2014, 10:51pm (UTC -6)
Another very strong episode. On par with "A Time to Stand" as a very effective stepping-stone episode.

Good things:

-The fight between Damar and the Jem'Hadar. There's something very satisfying about watching the bad guys at each other's throats like this.

-Rom. I normally have a hard time enjoying his scenes, but he's used really well in this arc. If he hadn't come into his own in "Bar Association" he certainly does here. The sabotage plan is genuinely tense.

-Odo. He's got a desire for order and "justice", but he's also very emotionally vulnerable. Episodes like "The Search," "Crossfire," and "Children of Time" have set this up particularly well. He IS part of the team, but he's also an outsider and his tendency toward obsessions can cause a lot of trouble for a lot of people. I'm glad the writers didn't forget about this.

-Kira. When she's mad, it makes every scene better. I think she's best character on the show, which is I think is pretty high praise considering the show also stars Odo, Sisko, Dukat, Garak, and Morn.

-Sisko working as Ross's assistant. Jammer's right that it just ups the ante. It makes sense, too, since Sisko's been shown to be something of a tactical whiz (think back to S3's "Defiant" when The Sisko unintentionally shows up Dukat with his tactical prowess, and right in front of the Obsidian Order too). I also have no problem with Dax being in command, and she's done it before. Worf would obviously be more desirable but I think he's put to better use with Martok on the Rotarran. See how big it all feels? Awesome.

A solid 3-1/2 star episode for me. This is the best stretch of Trek since the II-III-IV movie trilogy.
Jonathan
Sun, Oct 26, 2014, 2:32am (UTC -6)
I can't believe no one else has mentioned the label on the compartment that Rom got caught breaking into during the episode's final act!

A51. As in, Area 51.

Surely, that is not a coincidence.
MsV
Mon, Nov 17, 2014, 12:01am (UTC -6)
I loved this episode for many of the reasons all of you liked. them. I like Kira in this one too, but then again, I liked her from Season 4 on. I hated her 1-3. I am sure Kira won't forgive Odo right away, since it took until His way before a relationship began. I can only imagine how distant she was for a while, even when they never showed this on screen.
john smith
Fri, Oct 2, 2015, 2:24pm (UTC -6)
I think it would make more sense for the female changeling to impersonate Odo in the final scene when Kira talked to him, so that when Odo regain his sense it would look forced. The female changeling had a hold on him, but if even just one sentence was enough for Odo to see past her, then this conversation with Kira would make no sense.
Diamond Dave
Sat, Jan 30, 2016, 3:10pm (UTC -6)
Superb intro, as Kira commentates on the Cardassians and Jem'Hadar having at it. The rest of the episode doesn't keep up the same intensity though - the Sisko story, while interesting in its own way, doesn't really tell us anything new. We've had stories about Kirk, Picard etc finding it difficult to give up day to day command for bigger picture duties. Guess what - Sisko is the same.

The Odo story is intriguing, primarily because we haven't yet seen the resolution. We can assume his Zen like calm will not last - but how? Kira's anger is well realised, but this is really all about set up.

Rom early on is reminiscent of the Mirror Universe Rom, which is a nice touch though. Of course he got executed... 3 stars.
oskarsan
Tue, Feb 23, 2016, 1:47am (UTC -6)
great episode, really shows how the characters have changed because of the war.
jack_faith
Fri, Apr 8, 2016, 8:34am (UTC -6)
Strong episode. Agree with jammer on the opening scene here between Odo and the founder. What we're seeing in this season thus far is Sisko has been benched and Kira is effectively the quarterback/point guard, only on her terms. This whole Trek variant as Resistance rather than Roddenberry style providence, all's well that ends well, is very near to covering itself for some of the manifest shortcomings you run into when you overextend a franchise concept. There is nowhere else to go, creatively, than question, re-examine, the nature of the Federation's dominance. Lol above at the comment of Sisko's tactical nous. There is a rather more challenging issue, staring you in the face! I'd say well played, Behr, Ronald Moore and Rene, only you have supplanted one faux hero for an equally faux villain - not talking about Dukat (who everyone digs I hope) but the blasted Dominion - the Jem' Hadar and those hairdressers. Still, I do hear you Jammer on the comparison between the Borg and the Founders. A great last scene. Very classy. In spite of my objections I would very easily defend this remix/b side take on Trek against detractors. It really has broken free of the limitations of the self contained episode structure. (worst scene: Dax doing her impression of Sisko. Put her in a runabout with Wes, Deanna and her mom. Voyager never got this bad. Laters!)
Luke
Tue, May 24, 2016, 5:04am (UTC -6)
"Behind the Lines" is very successful at moving the plot forward and addressing relevant characterization. The main problem, sadly, is the ending. This is an absolutely chilling cliffhanger! Odo has gone over to the enemy, Rom has been arrested by the Cardassians and is being interrogated, Kira's plans are completely screwed, the minefield is being brought down and the Female Shapeshifter knows about the resistance. However, Odo's "defection" (it's probably not a coincidence that Quark misremembers "deflector" for "defector" earlier - nice bit of writing there!) never gets the payoff it virtually demands. After this he should have NEVER been reinstated as DS9's Chief of Security. If he's that vulnerable to the enemy's wiles then he has no business being in such a critically important post! But, much like with "Hard Time" and its lack of follow-up, that is a problem of later episodes, so I really can't hold it against "Behind the Lines", because the material actually presented here is top-notch. In fact, it's really a problem with "You Are Cordially Invited", as this issue is basically resolved by a single off-screen conversation between Kira and Odo.... in a closet.

The A-plot also offers some other really great material. Quark moving away from a neutral position to one aligned with Kira and the resistance, Rom showing that he can be a real winner of a character (despite what Jammer has said about him in the past) and the continued showing of cracks in the relationship between Dukat and Weyoun. I especially love the use of Quark here. Clearly the writers are finally using him as something more than the "comic" relief and treating him with respect. In fact, by the time the Occupation Arc is finished, he'll come away looking more like a hero than Odo. Beautiful!

The B-plot involving Sisko being made Admiral Ross's adjutant isn't anywhere near as compelling, but still enjoyable. It's nice to see the more low-level effects of the war like this while we focus on more large picture stuff in the A-plot (something "Sons and Daughters" failed at). And it's enjoyable to see Sisko attempt to adjust to this new position. I've heard through the grapevine that it was originally planned to make Sisko an Admiral after the Occupation Arc for his actions in retaking the station. That would have been a great change to the series! But it was scuttled at the last minute because the powers that be felt that nobody would accept the "main" character of a Star Trek series being something other than a Captain (pretty stupid when you remember that Sisko was a Commander for three years!). If there is a single problem with the episode, it's Dax's reenactment of the phaser cell ceremony in the Defiant's mess hall. Terry Farrell was simply not as convincing as Avery Brooks was with that material. You have to be more than a little manic to pull off a speech like that, and nobody on "Deep Space Nine" does that better than Avery Brooks.

9/10
Peter G.
Tue, May 24, 2016, 12:10pm (UTC -6)
@ Luke,

"If he's that vulnerable to the enemy's wiles then he has no business being in such a critically important post! But, much like with "Hard Time" and its lack of follow-up, that is a problem of later episodes, so I really can't hold it against "Behind the Lines", because the material actually presented here is top-notch. In fact, it's really a problem with "You Are Cordially Invited", as this issue is basically resolved by a single off-screen conversation between Kira and Odo.... in a closet."

I'm going to be a rebel here and go on record saying that I believe Odo and Kira resolving their issues off-screen in a closet was not only a good way to handle it, but was the best way they could have handled it. It seems like Odo's betrayal was so beyond the pale that we'd need to hear a really good argument from him to make up for it. Or maybe some people think there should have been no coming back from that. But what he had was basically a religious experience; the kind that changes your life in an instant. Of all people Kira would understand that, since she's said the same thing happens in an orb experience. In fact, Kira has even experienced this without an orb experience. When Akorem instructed the Bajorans to change their lives on a dime Kira went right along with it, giving up her responsibilities and quitting her job. Not out of malice, but because she saw a new calling; the same way Odo no doubt saw it when he felt called to the life of a Changeling in the link.

But about the resolution in the closet, I think a picture says more than words. For anyone who's been up all night bearing their heart to someone they're interested in or developing a relationship with, that feeling of intimacy where time goes away and even loud noises like the music don't matter - that's a real image that the sight of them in the closet conjured. At least, it did for me. Seeing them having a heart-to-heart in the closet always struck me close to the heart, because I know what sorts of difficult things they might have had to admit (both of them). Those things aren't our business to hear! It would almost be embarrassing to have to hear it. Just because the audience feels entitled to know everything as the ultimate voyeur doesn't mean it's what's best for the audience. The job of a storyteller is to get the audience to a destination, not to let them in on every possible detail. I, for one, am very pleased that what Odo and Kira said to each other remained between them, just as things should be between potential lovers.

I know the actors didn't like having these issues resolved in that way, but I think they're wrong as well. They're biased because they want the chance to act out those delicious scenes, but desire can conflict with understanding.
William B
Tue, May 24, 2016, 1:03pm (UTC -6)
I sort of agree with Peter G. on this regarding Odo/Kira, though I go back and forth. I think ultimately I can't quite parse the way they get together in "His Way" after this series of episodes, but for them to reestablish a kind of stability through private dialogue is sort of okay. Re: Luke's point that Odo should not be Chief of Security after this, I agree that in-universe a reassessment of his position would be prudent. However I always got the impression that Sisko et al. did not find out about what happened with Odo here. That Odo linked with the female changeling seems to be a matter of record, at least for Bashir (as his doctor), but the Dominion records do not show that Odo was supposed to be working for the Resistance and it would be up to the Resistance whether or not to talk about what Odo did. I tended to assume that there was a kind of agreement not to talk about it. Certainly I don't think Kira or Odo would want to talk about it.

That does, though, leave Quark, Rom, Leeta and Jake. Odo's non-action basically guarantees a death sentence for Rom (unless, of course, Odo intervenes to save him later), and his redemptive act is enough to go some way to redressing the consequences of his inaction, but is it everything? While Rom and Odo are not close, Quark's relationship with Odo should IMO have been impacted here too. I think we do see some impact, in that I think that Odo's relationship with Quark does seem to be less hostile and more recognizing that the two are both flawed individuals in "Who Mourns for Morn," "His Way" and "The Sound of Her Voice." Quark's knowledge of Odo's years-long pining for Kira and his overt loneliness is maybe how he understands/contextualizes Odo's betrayal.

All that said, in rewatching I was mostly more okay than I thought I would be with the aftermath of Odo's losing himself in the Link. There is a real sense that what happened in the Occupation really tested and transformed all the characters on the station. It reminds me a bit of the speed with which Odo forgives Garak's going over to Tain and even torturing him in "Improbable Cause"/"The Die Is Cast," to the point of even inviting Garak to have lunch sometime at the end of the episode. In addition to the religious experience Peter G. mentions, Kira has just for the first time felt the sting of feeling that she *herself* has perhaps become a collaborator in "Rocks and Shoals," and so she identifies with Odo even as she despises what he did, and in that "what about the Link?" moment in "Sacrifice of Angels" she also shows she recognizes what it is Odo has given up.

A lot of what I really like about this Occupation arc is that it is essentially a way for the show to reprise the Cardassian Occupation with some of the roles shifted and characters learning some unpleasant truths about themselves. After all, the lineup includes Kira, Odo, Dukat, Quark, and Rom, all of whom eventually find themselves on the opposite side of where they were before. And while "it is order you believe in, not justice" has been hanging over Odo since season three, I think this episode in particular is what finally demolishes the idea that Odo is some sort of incorruptible figure, while still allowing him to make a "real" choice to pick a side in the next few episodes.
William B
Tue, May 24, 2016, 1:26pm (UTC -6)
By "all of them find themselves on the opposite side" I should qualify that at some point or another during the second occupation they are in a position very unfamiliar to where they were during the first occupation, but certainly not always or even most of the time. (E.g. Kira mostly works for the Resistance but only after realizing she sees herself as a Collaborator; Quark tries to play neutral like he did before but this time he cannot; Odo tries to be for justice but collapses into his personal/spiritual connection with the Founder until his love for Kira brings his moral feeling for solids back. Just a summary, not meant to be exhaustive.)
William B
Tue, May 24, 2016, 2:28pm (UTC -6)
For Odo in particular, his belief, which everyone who knew him seemed convinced of, was that he had an innate sense of justice, possibly left over from his people ("Necessary Evil") which allowed him to be neutral and entirely fair and a true man of his word who respected all life while in the middle of a brutal regime with fights going on constantly. Despite working for the Cardassians, he somehow managed to earn respect from Bajorans like Kira because he stood above the fray (Kira even saw him as being above people like her, I suspect, based on her dialogue at the end of "Things Past"). Quark insisted in "A Man Alone" that Odo was *not* a collaborator. But this is all kind of suspicious; as Rusot and his flunkie rhetorically ask in "When It Rains," what exactly did Odo *think* was going to happen to the people he turned in? Odo certainly believes his own myth, as does everyone else, at the beginning of the series, and the people who don't are racist lunatics like those we see in "A Man Alone." But in "Vortex" Odo comes to realize that he can have respect for a criminal; in "Necessary Evil" we see that Odo was wrong on his *very first case*, that he is only just now learning what Kira was trying to tell him all those years ago about the impossibility of not choosing sides; in "The Alternate" Odo's buried rage is exposed. And then the Founders tell him that his love of justice is just love of order. Eventually we get to "Things Past" and it's revealed that his judgment was flawed but also that he was sloppy, for reasons which Odo-as-Thrax articulates: the Bajorans shouldn't be waging this pointless, disorderly resistance in the first place; Odo did not deliberately sell the Bajorans out knowing they were innocent, but he was already predisposed to look at them unkindly because he did not believe that any Bajorans' cause had any practical meaning or use.

So this episode throws another wrench into the proceedings, and something of the definite one: Odo breaks his word and doesn't even care once he links with the Female Founder, which particularly underscores that his ability to seek justice from a position of "neutrality" relied on the fact that he *was unable to form sufficiently close connections to threaten his objectivity*. Odo viewed romance as suspect and perhaps even something of a prelude to criminality early in the series. Now he gives himself over to interpersonal intimacy fully, which for the first time makes sense to him -- and which he places over everything else in his life. His code gets discarded because it was only a flimsy way to make sense of a world where he could not connect to anyone anyway.

Where I think this development weakens is over the next few episodes. (SPOILER) As is hardly a surprise, what brings Odo around is his feelings for Kira, which we have already learned stay him from the Link ("Heart of Stone"), lead him to personal depression and ruin ("Crossfire") and given enough time can warp him into caring about no lives but Kira's ("Children of Time"). And I think this development makes sense, but watching these episodes I still don't quite understand what changes from Odo's attitude at the end of this episode, his total serenity, and his anxious attempts to get Kira to like him again even in the following episode. I think some of it is simply time and the novelty wearing off -- the Link grows a little stale once he and the Founder start resorting to having humanoid sex and talking about how much Odo wants to do that with Kira -- and I do think that, given enough time, Odo's feelings for Kira would resurface. "Chimera" clarifies some of this by looking at different types of love; ultimately Odo recognizes in Kira a selfless/self-sacrificing dimension to love which is much less present in the Founders. In fact, I think that the key element really is faith -- without the actual intermingling provided by the Link, we have to rely on faith that our emotional understanding of other humanoid beings is an adequate reflection of what goes on with them within. Kira is defined by her faith, not just religious faith but faith in general, and I think it is that quality that Odo ends up falling in love with (he is much more of an empiricist), to the point where the comparatively tiny amounts of communication of affection he and Kira can share are enough to be worth more than the overwhelming sensory/spiritual experience of the Link, which nevertheless lacks the faith in goodness outside the Link which Kira represents.

The difference between Odo in these episodes and Odo in "What You Leave Behind," next time he and the Founder link, comes down mostly to his experience with Kira -- though I like to believe that Bashir and O'Brien risking their lives to cure him and his frienemiship with Quark matter too -- and his confidence in actually going for it, which requires a big leap of faith that is difficult for him given his various bad experiences over the years. In fact we could say that a lack of faith in anything they cannot directly feel is the *central* flaw of the Founders -- they are unable to believe that solids have good intentions since they cannot link with them, and they only trust solids whom they can manufacture as a result. So I do believe Odo coming around despite the overwhelming sensations from the Link to view Kira as being a person worth preserving, and finally to affirm most of the values that he had claimed to have before, but in terms of episode-to-episode execution I still find the transition from the Odo at the end of this episode to the one in "FtB" and "SoA" to be rocky.

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