Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:

Total Found: 124 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 5
Set Bookmark
ben
Tue, Oct 24, 2017, 2:17am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Lethe

I must admit it is really funny how emotional people get because of this show. :D
How is it to go completely of the rails after 6 episodes. Get a life guys... at least cool it a little and if you just don't like it, here is a crazy thought, don't watch it.
And to everyone who shouts "BULLSHIT SCIENCE!!!" yeah it totally is but
Maybe you should rewatch some of the older shows. Wes and a time alien touching consoles through which the Enterprise could reach far away places.
Or Sisko and his son flying around in a solar power bajoran ship with warp speed.
Or the mirror universe.
or
or
or

Set Bookmark
ben
Mon, Oct 23, 2017, 11:13am (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: Lethe

Well apart from the whole subspace telepathy thing and the mind fighting.
I kind of liked this a little more. Chars seemed more positive and supportive.
The admiral plot was pretty obvious, though.
Set Bookmark
Ben S
Fri, Oct 13, 2017, 8:53pm (UTC -5)
Re: ORV S1: Krill

For me, this was the best episode of an already good show. Orville beats Discovery in my mind, so I hope they continue to deliver.
Set Bookmark
Ben S
Tue, Oct 10, 2017, 4:46pm (UTC -5)
Re: DSC S1: The Butcher's Knife Cares Not for the Lamb's Cry

...and this was the episode where I quit trying. I shut it off three quarters of the way through and turned on an episode of TNG to wipe the bad taste out of my mouth. If this is the future of Trek, I’m out.

So many things I hate about this show. So many. I gave it 3 3/4 episodes to impress me, which is more than some shows get, but it failed on so many levels.

They could have stripped out everything that references Star Trek and had a workable grim sci-fi show that was its own thing. But, no, they had to try to cash in on the Star Trek name with something that is clearly not Star Trek. Doesn’t work for me. If I didn’t already pay for CBS for other reasons, I would cancel my subscription.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Tue, Oct 3, 2017, 2:53pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Renaissance Man

@PeterG,

Maybe you should re-watch the show again in its entirety before agreeing with Jammer now in 2017. I found a great appreciation for this show now in retrospect and maybe you will too.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Fri, Sep 29, 2017, 12:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Renaissance Man

@Chrome, TNG and DS9 were amazing shows, some of the best TV of all time. So, to say Voyager was maybe not quite as good as those shows, still says a lot about how wonderful this show truly was. But, from reading Jammer's reviews as a whole, I never got the impression he appreciated what he was watching most of the time. Again, this really comes through in his last few reviews of the series, where his overall disappointment of the series becomes quite clear to me. I just finished rewatching the entire series again, and I have really come to appreciate how good this show was, and how it's possible we may never get a Star Trek show as good as this again. I definitely get that impression after watching the first couple of episodes of Discovery.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Fri, Sep 29, 2017, 12:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Endgame

Let me sum it up for all of those haters on Voyager which call themselves Star Trek fans, of which Jammer is really included:

It was a great show that had plenty of Sci-Fi intrigue, mixed with action and heartwarming stories about humanity. A wonderful addition to the Star Tek universe, which is miles better than Discovery at this point. Discovery hardly resembles a Star Trek show. Very disappointing through 2 episodes so far.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Sun, Sep 24, 2017, 1:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Renaissance Man

@Chrome, if you have read every review Jammer has done on this show then it's the mistakable conclusion that he is disappointed with this show as a whole. And I just want to voice my opinion that I disagree wth that general sentiment and am very fond of this show as a whole.
Set Bookmark
Ben Ramsey
Fri, Sep 22, 2017, 11:46pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: A Matter of Perspective

Just wanted to mention one thing that I didn't see anyone comment on - why would the Federation put their officers at risk of prison by having any dealings whatsoever with a culture that does "guilty until proven innocent"? To me that's the most unbelievable part of this episode. There would be some sort of diplomatic immunity, at least to some degree, or some negotiated amnesty, all done ahead of time, before being willing to subject themselves to such potential liability.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Fri, Sep 22, 2017, 9:50am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Renaissance Man

I disagree with Jammer's assessment of the series as a whole. I found many of Voyager's episodes to be moving and thought provoking. An excellent series overall and a wonderful addition to the Star Trek saga. I'm glad I passed my love of this show along to my children.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Sat, Sep 9, 2017, 1:30pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Homestead

I'm glad some people recognized how great the scene was with Janeway and Neelix near the end. She didn't want to see him go but she caught on very quickly where the conversation was going and you can see it in her eyes and in her facial expression right before and during the dialogue where she devises that Delta Quadrant ambassador role. Well written too and well acted too by both Mulgrew and Phillips. Voyager was a very special show and gets overlooked becaue of TNG and DS9.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Tue, Sep 5, 2017, 11:32am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Friendship One

C'mon guys, obviously Janeway doesn't believe that exploration in general doesn't justify the loss of life. Nobody in Starfleet would believe that, especially not Janeway. She was referring specifically to this probe and that in retrospect, the sending of this probe for the purpose of exploration wasn't justified due to the loss of life experienced here since it's been Starfleet's policy for a long time not to give technology to civilizations that aren't ready for it. That's all she meant by that line.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Tue, Sep 5, 2017, 10:11am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Author, Author

I can't believe anyone is not happy about watching the latter part of this episode because it has similarities to Mesaure of a Man. Doesn't it make sense that there should be a legal decision as to whether Holograms as advanced as Doc should be considered a Person? Would that legal determination be any less interesting because we saw an episode many years before on a different Star Trek show that involved the legal rights of Androids? Not to me it doesn't. It's a totally logical progression of events based on everything we've seen on Voyager. Like Jammer, I was wondering about this issue for some time and it was great to see a payoff of some here. I commend Voyager for exploring the issue of sentient holograms to the full extant it did after the issue was first introduced but not really explored many years before on TNG.
Set Bookmark
Ben Sisko
Sun, Sep 3, 2017, 11:59am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Q2

No wonder why Star Trek went off the air in 2005. It wasn't that Enterprise was so bad, it's because many of its so-called fans love to hate on it. This episode was a thoroughly amusing hour of television. It didn't need to be an intellectually challenging episode. Voyager had plenty of those too. It's also just fun to watch an episode like this which is meant to be quite whimsical. Lighten up Star Trek watchers.
Set Bookmark
Benjamin
Thu, Aug 31, 2017, 11:43am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S4: In a Mirror, Darkly, Part II

I just don't see how this empire can survive with everyone killing each other to get to the top.
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Wed, Aug 2, 2017, 5:09pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Endgame

I enjoyed the finale for what it was - an exciting action flick, but I also agree with all of the complaints about it. It could've been so much more. Especially some sort of epilogue. The way it ended, it felt like there was going to be a follow up episode.

What bugs me about the main conflict between the Janeways was what to do about the transwarp hub. All I could think of, when they were planning to blow it up, was, "They built it. They can build it again. So how does this matter?" Even worse, they mention that there are six transwarp hubs. The animation in Astrometrics, displayed the connections from the one hub they were talking about destroying. It showed connections throughout the galaxy. So, are we to assume the other 5 hubs don't have a similar spread of connections? If so, what will destroying a single hub accomplish in the long run? Unless we go with the idea that it's just this one hub that has so many connections and the rest only have a few strands. The basis of this conflict was lame and this problem should've been pointed out in the episode, so that they could focus more on attacking the central node/queen's cluster/whatever it's called. That at least made sense, but since it's less eye candy, we just have to assume that the suicide infiltration by Janeway with the "virus" (what the hell was it anyway? and how did it destroy the complex?) works without giving us any information on how that was possible. And are we supposed to assume that the queen's cluster getting blow'd up destroyed ALL of the Borg? Or not? Or some? Or the other transwarp hubs? hello?
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Tue, Aug 1, 2017, 1:26am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Natural Law

What I appreciate about Seven's character during the final season is that she often became the opposition voice - putting forth a point of view that ran counter to the one that was either the point of the episode, or the main argument put forth by a major character. This was especially poignant in Repentance. No judgement, just highlighting that no one side has a monopoly on logic or morality. (That is, of course, what makes a dilemma a dilemma. Otherwise it's just a propagandizing morality play.)

So comes the moment when Seven talks about the Ledosians helping the Ventu with technology, infrastructure and education. Chakotay objects to this:
Chakotay: "Can you honestly say you know what's better for them?"
Seven: "...No, I can't."
Janeway: "Then what do you think we should do?"
Seven: "I am uncertain."
Janeway: "It's not like you to be on the fence."

That last bit with Janeway seems to be meant to solidify the idea that she doesn't have strong moral or logical reasoning to back up her statement. And this is where I lost my @#$% when watching this episode. This is the kind of scene that ideologues construct in which they think they've scored some sort of moral and intellectual point that silences the opposition to some humble state where there is no adequate reply to maintain their position. Bull$hit. What Seven should have said was:

Seven: "Commander, can you honestly say that YOU know what's best for them?"

I would love to see that smug face struggle to say 'No' when it's so obvious that he does think he knows what's best for someone else. That he knows how another culture, on another planet, should (or should not) develop. That he should be able to dictate how and when a culture, not his own, should or shouldn't be exposed to other things.

But don't worry, the writers covered for this obvious hypocrisy by making it obvious that these people don't suffer or have to work really hard to survive. They have herbs and poultices that heal bone micro-fractures in a matter of days! Wow! they don't need antibiotics or alcohol! Who needs hospitals? And with that magical barrier, they never have to deal with dangers or the threat of maturing into an advanced race on their own. Thank the gods for the powers of writing in excuses into the script. Yes! For the sake of someone else's ideals and values, the Ventu must stay at their technological level. So enlightened!

They're basically living in a terrarium mean to keep them the way they are. Forever.

Seven's reply of not being sure is the most honest answer, but it's used here as a kind of agitprop for the morality of Chakotay's position.
Set Bookmark
Ben S
Mon, Jul 31, 2017, 9:47am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Night Terrors

Seems like I don't agree with some of the reviews on this site, I found "Devil's Due" to be entertaining, for example, but this episode to be a boring mess. The crew might not be able to get REM sleep, but this episode nearly gave it to me.
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Sat, Jul 22, 2017, 1:49am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Critical Care

I can see this episode being an allegory for either of the two most common assumptions: the US health care system or socialized medicine. It's actually quite telling that this is possible. But if we look at the pattern of ideology (and let's be honest, the Star Trek universe is a socialist utopia) that the writers and stories have shown us over the years, it's most likely meant to be critical of the US system. Fair enough. It's their show and they can say what they want on it, and I was fine taking the story as it is (I despise socialism, btw).

But it wasn't until I watched the SF Debris review of the episode that I noticed what was missing from the allegory that makes it crumble under the weight of logic. Money is never mentioned once. Only value to society. Chuck does a great job of pointing out that the criticism towards the US system makes sense if you are talking about money (in terms of how the Allocator determined where care was to go), but if there is no money involved, then the allegory makes no sense. It's the kind of messy mixing of metaphors/similes that happens all too often when one is too eager to promote an argument in a message show. If the Allocator was programmed to distribute care based on value to society, the result would not look like the socialist wet dream (by which I mean a representation that is so obviously meant to show the results of evil capitalism) that we have in 'Critical Care'. I understand where they wanted to go, and on the surface it looks like they got there, but in truth the message is muddied by sloppy allegory whose logic fails to holdup under scrutiny. It's like taking a plane to France and ending up in Paris, California (and trying to convince everyone that the chapparal in the your pictures is standard plumage in the French capital).
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Tue, Jul 18, 2017, 6:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Unimatrix Zero, Part II

So, the reason they had to invade the tactical cube was so that they could "infect" all of the drones who were part of UM-0 at the same time through the central thingy. Ok.

Later, when those drones had been cut off from the collective by the virus and the Queen had no way to access them, she threatened to "infect" the drones with the same virus (only modified to kill them) by using UM-0.

If you could run the infection through UM-0, to get at the drones who were part of UM-0, why bother with the cube?
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Tue, Jul 18, 2017, 1:13am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Fury

This episode pissed me off. But it wasn't the Kes mess that did it. It was the "return" of the Vidiians (or the reminder, I guess). Yes, the Kes story was really botched and they screwed up what could've been a wonderful Coda to a character I liked. But it's the Vidiians that enfuriate me.

Well, maybe I should be honest and say it's not the Vidiians, but Voyager's reaction/handling of them. Here is a species that LITERALLY looks at every other sentient species as consumable. They're not desperate, they're evil. They may have begun as desperate, but now they only look to consume. Why would you treat them with kid gloves...ever? If you don't put them down when you meet them, they will turn on you without exception.

When the grappling things were broken off, Voyager fired torpedoes at it and they obviously got through the shielding. They should've kept firing until there was nothing left. Anything left alive would just attack and consume whoever passed by.

They were an excellent villainous force in the show - my angry reaction to them is a good indication for me, but it was the kid glove treatment that pissed me off. Voyager should've built a coalition of species predated by the Vidiians and led a massive fleet to wipe them all out. (Hmm...maybe they should've done that with the Borg, too...but hell, I like the Borg. Yeah, I know. But at least the Borg want to use you as a living being to increase their own. The Vidiians want to literally rip you to pieces to fix themselves.)
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Thu, Jul 13, 2017, 10:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Spirit Folk

This episode didn't deserve it's one star. The only moment I really enjoyed was (and maybe I'm giving the writers too much credit) the call back to Logan's Run when the Doctor drones, "There is no Other Side....only Voyager...." I actually laughed out loud at that.

And that was the only good point of the episode. I can't recall yelling at the television, "Why does that even matter?" so many times before this. All of the usual complaints have already been mentioned but there was one point in the episode at which I literally threw up my hands in frustration. The shotgun blast to the holodeck control console was stupid enough on its own, but what really pissed me off was that it turned off the safeties Permanently. When I say permanently, I mean that either they designed the holodeck so that the safeties can only be turned on/off INSIDE the holodeck, or the crew simply forgot to consider turning the safeties back on from outside of it. And I will not buy any bullsh!t about the shotgun scrambling the controls so that the safeties stay off. That makes the tech on board Voyager equivalent to those old Christmas lights where if one bulb burned out the whole thing wouldn't light and you had to figure out which one to replace by testing each one.

This is my first run through Voyager and I consider this episode to be the very worst so far - even more than Threshold. Threshold at least had bullsh!t come out of nowhere leaving me in a state of bewildered shock wondering if it was bad on purpose. Spiritfolk was made up of nothing but the laziest contrivances that makes me recall one of the best lines from MST3K: "You know, this was really avoidable." (The Pumaman S09E03 - if you're curious.)
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Thu, Jun 29, 2017, 3:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Equinox, Part II

Very tense and fun episode. Major complaint would be Janeway's hypocrisy, but it isn't. Her experiences in the Delta quadrant actually support her condemnation of Ransom's actions and violation of Federation Principles. The true culprit of hypocrisy is Janeway's superpower: plot contrivance. Because Voyager seemed to be uninterested in exploring the idea of a Federation starship in dire circumstances over a long period of time, they used the Reset Button on a near-weekly basis. (Can you imagine how much more engaging and interesting Voyager would've been with even a sprinkling of what Equinox went through?) Plot contrivances allowed for Janeway to take stands and act based on Federation principle because she would rarely have to face the consequences of her actions - either because the episode is written to conclude with her in the right or when she did face consequences, they didn't matter because they would be resolved or ignored by the episodic reset button.

It doesn't take away that the episode was gripping at times. It was nice to get a taste of what Voyager could've been in better and bolder hands.
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Tue, Jun 27, 2017, 3:37pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Think Tank

I can't think of the think tank as truly villainous. The intro segment was a legitimate deal, and that the blue fish-dude tried to lie his way out of it without the proper payment. Sure, their replicators "wouldn't work" by a plot contrivance, but there's more than one way to get/grow/trade/barter/buy food. Therefore the introduction was an attempt to make a legitimate act of helpfulness look sinister while the ones who were helped are cast as the victims, even thought they're the ones trying to deceive! Of course, later in the episode the Think Tank is much more villainous since they orchestrated the events to create a situation that would work to their own goals. (which made me wonder...did they create the trap that destroyed that planet? or was it those bounty hunters? Pretty extreme measures either way. Or can a planet literally explode randomly when you scan it?)

There was a jaw-dropping moment for me in the planet explosion scene. Voyager's shields are up and a chunk of the debris them, gets vaporized, and hurls Voyager backwards. Given the size, mass and speed of the chunk of 'sploded planet, there is no way in hell Voyager (or any ST universe ship) could possibly survive that. I mean, if Voyager's shields can block that, there's no way any weapons fire from anyone can get through. I know its just eye candy, but it's utterly ridiculous. I've always been critical of planet-busting visuals - starting with when I first saw Episode IV as a kid. The best depiction of planet 'splosion was in Titan AE. Those chunks were deadly. And the most realistic-looking (in my experience) is the Stellar Converter from Master of Orion II.
Set Bookmark
Reuben K
Fri, Jun 23, 2017, 12:08am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Gravity

@Tmrn I agree with nearly everything you said. It would've been really engaging if the aliens attacking at the end were that desperate and Tuvok points out that they are not necessarily the enemy. Of course, that would require the original message that Voyager sent to include the information of what the idiotic and inexcusably inflexible aliens were doing to the sinkhole and what that would do to the planets therein.

My point of contention is the racist remark: "Is it because she is white and looks like a human and has sparkly stuff on her face while the aliens look less human and have darker skin?" Too often these days such a statement is brushed aside, accepted or simply ignored because it targets "the Man" or white people. Basically it's become acceptable to make disparaging remarks about a particular skin color because of the skin color - making a race-based judgement. I understand the history behind the accusation and for all I know it might be true! But that does make its tone any less racist than it is.

I mean no offense to you Tmrn. I just wanted to make the point that this kind of behavior shouldn't be accepted. Again, the trend you point out may have some basis in fact, but too often it is used by race-baiters on both sides to pollute the debate with their own agendas.
Next ►Page 1 of 5
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2017 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.