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Yakko
Fri, Aug 7, 2015, 6:43pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Deadlock

@Yanks

I certainly agree that the episode teasers were too revealing but I don't think your example qualifies as a spoiler. If someone were watching for the first time and noticed the character's name was Marritza in the opening credits it would only reinforce the Cardassian prisoner's assertion in the first two acts of the story that he is, in fact, a filing clerk named Marritza. Only in the second half of the episode does he openly masquerade as Gul Darheel until his breakdown at the end of the show. Now if this were TNG's "The Defector" and James Sloyan were identified as "Admiral Jarok" at the top of the show then I'd agree with you...

Still it would have been simpler all around to just list the actor without specifying the character's name.
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Yakko
Sat, May 18, 2013, 12:09am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Death Wish

No Sintek. Your life is not richer and your human experience is not deeper because you never noticed the difference in the costume. You're just less observant. Now if you noticed the difference but just didn't give a shit THAT would suggest you might have healthier priorities. However you ARE posting a comment in a "Star Trek" message thread - and a "Voyager" one at that. Unless you're randomly trolling boards then you must be as big a geek as anyone here. Still I'll be the bigger geek and point out that the commbadge props were made of wood and not plastic.
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Yakko
Sun, Sep 23, 2012, 11:48am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S1: Caretaker

As long as we're dogpiling on this pilot episode nearly 18 years later I have a minor quibble that's always bugged me. The Caretaker is almost portrayed sympathetically and nobody seems to hold him accountable for the mass murders he commits in bringing ships to the DQ. Janeway is pretty hard nosed with him on their first encounter about how unacceptable his actions have been in bringing her ship there and abducting her crew. We couldn't at least get a line indicating that she's a just a little pissed that he caused the death of over a dozen of her crew?

I agree with the general sentiment here that the show is a fairly solid pilot that shows quite a bit of promise that the show will largely not deliver in the ensuing seasons.
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Yakko
Sun, Sep 16, 2012, 4:42pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: Valiant

Ladies and gentlemen, we're all posting comments to a review of an episode of "Star Trek". It's safe to say we're all nerds and that nerds should hold themselves to a more exacting standard of minituae recall.

In "The First Duty" Wesley Crusher was not a member of Red Squad or Nova Team or Nova Squad. It was Nova Squadron.

Sheesh.
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Yakko
Fri, Sep 14, 2012, 1:51pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Timescape

@Paul

Well I didn't mean to imply that runabouts made shuttles obsolete. They certainly stayed in service and there was no evidence that Voyager had anything but shuttles until Tom built the Delta Flyer. But why couldn't Picard and Data been flying a runabout back to the Enterprise in "Genesis" for example? I'd only be guessing but it could be that the runabout forward interior set was too often unavailable. Remember that during "TNG"'s seventh season "DS9" was concurrently in production on its second. The Defiant hadn't been introduced yet so the runabout set was in use a great deal.
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Yakko
Thu, Sep 13, 2012, 9:27am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Descent, Part I

@Nic

I agree that the teaser is the best part of the ep. I love Newton's outraged "How dare you!" when Data dismisses the apple story as apochryphal.

I never thought about "First Contact" being the end of Data's arc but he definitely regressed afterwards.

"Generations" - He gets the emotion chip and it overloads his neural network and becomes fused - it can neither be removed nor deactivated so Data's just got to learn to live with having feelings.

"First Contact" - He can turn the chip on and off at will. Okay - I can buy that he and Geordi figured out a way to do this. The Borg Queen attempts to use Data's emotions to manipulate him much as Lore did but, as William B says, Data proves to be emotionally mature enough to behave true to his morality.

"Insurrection" - He can now remove the chip if he wants and he never has it installed throughout the entire film. He's intensely curious about the experience of childhood but never bothers to explore it through an emotional context.

"Nemesis" - The chip is never mentioned and might as well have never existed since Data is STILL talking about his quest to become more than he is but seems content to be less than he was two films ago.
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Yakko
Thu, Sep 13, 2012, 9:00am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Timescape

@Paul

In DS9's second season episode "Paradise" O'Brien mentions that runabouts are a new class of vessel that had only been in service for two years. So of course we'd never seen the Enterprise crew use them since they didn't exist before. It seems believable that the flagship would be equipped with a few of them. I always liked that they had a runabout here because it helped build continuity between the two shows.

That said it would have been cool if they'd used the NEVER SEEN Captain's Yacht that's docked on the underside of the saucer section.
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Yakko
Thu, Sep 13, 2012, 8:40am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Suspicions

I've always layed that overwrought feminist bent at the feet of Jeri Taylor. The worst example for me was in VOY on "Parallax" when Janeway and Torres sit and spew technobabble back and forth and excitedly figure out the entire plot while the menfolk look on with dull expressions. The early Janeway was almost written as a Mary Sue instead of the nuanced and more believable leader she eventually became. I never thought Major Kira was written as a feminist cipher so much as a hothead. I've always chalked that up to the fact that her role was originally intended for Ro Laren.

As for "Suspicions" I agree with every criticism here but I still enjoy it. By the sixth season TNG had become like a comfortable old blanket to me and I just liked spending time on the ship with the characters even if the stories were often mediocre. Probably a hypnotic side effect of the bland boring monotonous sonic wallpaper that passed for musical scoring at that point.
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Yakko
Sun, Sep 9, 2012, 7:22pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Frame of Mind

Thanks Otter. I had the same thought in retrospect about Frakes' agitation. He's in just about every frame of that episode and often doing a lot of yelling and carrying on so I imagine he was working 16 hour days.

I actually spoke to him at a sci-fi con three years ago and it never occurred to me to tell him that story. Probably for the best - I probably would have come off like Annie Wilkes from "Misery" if I had!
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Yakko
Sat, Sep 8, 2012, 8:58am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Frame of Mind

I've never been particularly fond of this episode but it always resonates with me on a personal level. In February of 1993 I was a young Trekkie visiting family in L.A. and I made a pilgrimmage to the Paramount lot in hopes of catching a glimpse of "TNG" - the sets, an actor - something. There were no tours but I managed to sneak on to the lot. (Not through the famous main gates but through the far less secure Gower Street entrance on the side.) I carried a clipboard and mostly walked purposefully in the hope that I'd look like someone who was supposed to be there. After circling the lot a few times (the coolest part for me were the city streets I recognized from "The Untouchables" and countless other productions) I took a stab at entering Stage 8 through yet another side door. Out of nowhere I was spotted by some guy with a headset. I bluffed and pretended to be lost and looking for David Livingston's office (a name I only knew from show credtis!) and he sent me on my way. I was too freaked to try entering the building again so I kept walking near the trailers with the slim hope of seeing a cast member. I was just about to give up when I saw none other than Jonathon Frakes. He had just gone to his trailer and was upset about something. I don't remember what he said but he looked like he was about to tear some poor P.A. a new one. He shot me an angry look and stormed off. Given his apparent mood and my own status as a trespasser it seemed unwise to say anything to him but I was curious why he wasn't wearing his Starfleet uniform costume but instead was dressed completely in black in a kind of informal tunic. I left the lot shortly after and would never have known what episode he was shooting until "Frame of Mind" aired three months later and I saw that he spent most of the show in the same black tunic I had seen that day. In retrospect I'm damned lucky I wasn't arrested but it was thrilling at the time.
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Yakko
Thu, Aug 20, 2009, 3:27am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Badda-Bing, Badda-Bang

I'm completely with Bligo. That whole scene with Sisko and Kasidy discussing the status of blacks in 1960s Las Vegas strikes me as something written to appease Avery Brooks' concerns with the glamorization of the Rat Pack era in the show. While I'm sure he'd argue the issue was very relevant in 1998 it seems completely incongruous that a 24th century human in the Star Trek universe would refer to the struggle of "our people" unless he was referring to humanity as a whole. Granted Chakotay veered into this territory with Native Americans but in that case it was a group that had deliberately kept itself somewhat distinct from the rest of Earth's culture. To me having Sisko make such divisions does much more to undermine the Roddenberry vision than any of the flexible morality the Federation displays during the Dominion War. It's always spoiled the episode for me a little bit.
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