Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:

Total Found: 92 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 4
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Tue, Oct 31, 2017, 9:34pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: Majority Rule

This is my favorite episode to date of the Orville and Best Sci-Fi in comparison between Discovery vs. Orville to date. I know Jammer is still resistant to the idea of the comedy in the show and I can see that, but let's be honest, the social commentary is spot on and if this were an episode of Voyager/DS9/TNG, it would have been given 4 stars.

The social commentary of social media and direct democracy is great, what Seth did here was underline the very biggest elephant in the room, "Democratic values do not work" in reality. It's too easy to push people into a type of thought without context, creating mobs of majority with similar ideas and ideals.

In the American and world social media, we are encountering these problems from celebrity/political maneuvering to cyber bullying by kids forming these kinds of flash online mobs. It's a reflection of how bad pure democratic system with no outside ethical or moral basis can be.

Set Bookmark
Trekker
Sat, Oct 7, 2017, 3:35pm (UTC -6)
Re: ORV S1: If the Stars Should Appear

Orville to me is okay, like Star Trek TNG Season 1.

It's serviceable, but not original.

When you contrast this show to Star Trek Discovery, breaking new ground in the wrong direction, I have to ask the question:

Do you want to enjoy a TV show that ventures into a dark world that masquerades itself as a Utopia? Or do you want to live in a light world that does not hide its frivolous nature?

I think Orville needs a game changer episode to put it up there with the best of Classic Trek, but it's on a good trajectory for something like that. Star Trek Discovery in contrast is heading in a direction that makes it far more akin to Battlestar Galactica and Star Wars than Star Trek, I expect it not to live up to the classics and stride for different path that is appealing to some, but just not what I'd consider engaging for a Star Trek show. I love the new BSG for a reason, just like I liked DS9, TNG, and TOS for others, along with Babylon 5.

Right now I want optimistic Sci-Fi, not Pessimistic Sci-Fi.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Sat, Oct 7, 2017, 12:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Context Is for Kings

I agree with the assessment of other fans, this is most likely the prequel story for introducing Section 31's activity in the 23rd century, basically retconning them. Perhaps we will see the Omega particle experiment that was mentioned in Voyager around this period as well.

Still, I disagree with Jammer's review and praise for this show. Don't get me wrong I love Alias, The Wire, and many shows involving complex "things we must do for greater good", but this is Star Trek after all.

Gene Roddenberry's vision was of a time when humanity would be able to solve our own problems and reach out into the Stars, seek out new life and civilization, and boldly go where no has gone before.

Star Trek isn't a Sci-Fi intrigue show with mysterious plots, cool tech, and morally ambiguous characters. Humanity was meant to be exalted for our virtues, not made grey for our modern issues. Instead of looking into a future beyond partisan bickering, religious issues, and perceived human racial differences, we're moving back into territories that would work for most modern TV Shows.

At the heart of it what does this say for us as viewers and the public at large, if this is what Star Trek has become, what we have become, when we can no longer look towards a future of hope and potential.

In the original DS9 episode, we got the shades of grey, but it was matched by optimism of Dr. Bashir, who represented the better parts of humanity in contrast. In Enterprise we had Johnathan Archer, who while not as strong as a acharacter, was still an idealist with hopes for a better future.

We had good contrast when introducing Star Trek's shadowy Section 31, Michael just doesn't show that same level of contrast. Furthermore, the plot lends itself to far too much darkness than hope, I mean what hope can be seen in the depths of war with the Klingon Empire.

My issue is one of philosophy on this point.

There's also plot contrivances that I did not really like in this episode, like the whole "criminal being unguarded schtick" that allowed Michael to wander freely on the ship, then the whole Sci-Fi horror sequence.

2 out of 4 in my book, I know what they're going for, but it's not really Star Trek. It's "Derivative Spy/Secret Organization thriller, A star Trek show" in the vain of "Rogue One, A Star Wars Movie". There's a difference between the real deal and its ancillary productions.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Fri, Sep 1, 2017, 12:33am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Tacking into the Wind

On a non-Dominion, but larger mythology note for Trek from TOS-DS9, I think Worf really deserved to be Chancellor of the Klingon Empire, even more than Martok.

It's not something I see discussed here or on other Trek related areas, but Worf had a lot of things going for his "divine" right to rule, for a Klingon:

1. He is from a Noble Klingon House, even back during the TOS days in Star Trek VI, his grandfather was a high ranking member of Klingon society and his father sat on the council. Sure, they're not as militarily oriented or politically connected as the Duras family or even Gowron, which is why Mogh, Worf's father, could so easily be castigated as a scapegoat. Worf is still noble-blooded.

2. He defeated Duras in a duel, while Duras was seeking to claim the Chancellorship. It means Worf, if he still had his noble title could have made the same claim and legitimately have taken it from Duras (and likely Gowron).

3. He found Kahless' clone, sure it's not like finding Christ's second coming, but he did install the 1st Klingon Emperor in many generations, returning a constitutional monarch to Klingon Society. In any other situation, he should have been a member at court.

4. He, along with Kor and Dax, found the Sword of Kahless. That's like finding Excalibur or the holy grail. Of all the odds in the universe, Q must have stacked it in his favor :P Quite honestly, Worf is the only one left from the Quest alive (Kor died in a blaze of glory and Jadzia died due to Dukat), so he has sole claim right now. If he wants to, he can go back to coordinates where he jettisoned the sword, then just take power.

For all those reasons, Worf, and the writers, should have just let him become Klingon leader, he was meant to be.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Thu, Aug 31, 2017, 10:45pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Treachery, Faith, and the Great River

Odo stories are introspective and deeply plotted.

I think this is among his best and DS9's best as well, dealing with War, Conscientious Objectors, and Faith. Religion was the subtext, but as a theologian once said, there's no war without faith, because there would be no reason to fight. (I think it was Cardinal Richelieu, not sure if I got his quote right).

It also opens up a long term plot issue of the Founder's death due to a virus, which is spread in an odd nod to HIV/AIDS (you can interpret it in many different ways, but a changeling's link is pseudo-sexual.)
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Tue, Aug 29, 2017, 8:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: In the Pale Moonlight

@Real Ric

TNG is a late 80's wholesome Sci-Fi show that had trappings of its times. The dream of evolved human beings was subsequently overwritten.

The TNG fan boys are optimists and we do need them in our dark world to plot a future ahead as we're stuck In the Pale Moonlight, we live a world with terrorism, fundamentalism, fanaticism, racism, elitism, and all the worst that mankind has created. We want to rise above all this and seek strange new worlds, but to do that, we must face some ugly truths, not everyone is Captain Picard or Janeway, most are Kirk and Sisko, soldiers fighting for a better way of life while mired in the war.

@Chrome

Why can't it be both?

People know the CIA can be nasty and grotesque, they know the NSA is spying on them, and yet, they accept it still believing in Justice, Liberty, and Freedom in the US. Realistically, we gave up our moral high ground, but perspectively, we believe we're still right for compromising it.

Section 31 and Sisko's actions are nothing more than what people have come to accept from our own intelligence agencies or military officers.

If DS9 were produced in 207, this episode should have had a follow-up post dominion war. I'd love to think that Jake Sisko would discover this truth about his father and Garak's dealings, then pull a Snowden on both of them. Ultimately, the revelation in the 24th century as such revelations in 21st century, are meaningless, because We, the people, have accepted this reality (and our own acceptance also leads to denial into the Trump Administration's era)
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Mon, Aug 28, 2017, 9:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Past Tense, Part I

The Episode is good as a social commentary of how bad we can be as human beings and how low we can go. It is timeless, because human drive for separating ourselves from others is a permanent fixture in our history: from Slavery to modern day ghettos vs. Suburbs. We are a tragic species with cycles of horrible actions. In Star Trek, if it weren't for World War III and some help from the Vulcans as Good Samaritans, we'd still be stuck.

Perhaps, we should evaluate this episode more for what is in our present (very close to their Present 2024) and see what we can do to prevent it.

--------------------------------------------
@Bob

I think they were focusing more on the issue of insulating poor people into Sanctuary cities/Safe areas that the Left has been promoting as a defensive tactic. Pres. Trump's actions are turning this defensive tactic into a siege tactic, the Liberal Bastions are insulated, defended by municipal walls to keep out people, but in the end without money, influence, and support from outside, these places might as well become Become Sanctuary Districts like this episode.

I think your anger is misplaced, the Left's own desire to seek shelter will likely create the outcome that is most feared. If you were just trying to get to be angry at you and raise hell, CNN and other forums are better for that.

@Those on the Progressive side, if you want to prevent Sanctuary districts from rising, prevent this kind of segregation based on poverty, and social status (on this point, I do agree that the episode heavily implied immigration issues to point when a supporting character in Part 2 was distinctly Hispanic descent was telling his story to the web), then stop creating castles and do something about the world at large. If there's prejudice in the small towns, drive down to the closest town of less than 20K people and go to the local Church, School, or Bar and practice some good civic duty and better yet invite some friends from different racial/ethnic/religious backgrounds too. Help set up events, fundraise, or buy a round of drinks and just be part of America rather than preach down.

-----------------------------------------------

Overall, this future is not set in stone, we have time to change it.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Mon, Aug 28, 2017, 8:22pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Children of Time

To answer the question on Time Travel, I have a simple answer:

What if the events in this episode happened in an alternate Universe- Timeline aka Abram's Kelvin-verse and when the defiant was in orbit the 1st time, it had already split into its quantum duplicate like the Voyager episode Deadlock?

Star Trek has already given us answers to the questions many people pose here, all you must do is use the canon to answer them.

It would also solve a different mystery too, Dax did not know what the crew did in the episode, so what Yedrin knew was from an alternate timeline set off already from the point of departure in the first entry.

However, I'll warn you if toy take my interpretation literally as the right one, then this episode is a guiltless platitude rather than make Odo a potential genocidal Dominion changeling for the sake of Kira.

I like the original interpretation of fate being in our hands rather than the one I came up with. Sometimes, even if your solution is correct and makes more logical sense, the idea of "perceived" free will and choices of good/bad choices makes the story richer.

In the Star Trek Universe, if you can't explain something, we can always say its Q, just like humans do with God, We can also explore things using science, logic, and deductive reasoning, which comes up with a less interesting though more likely correct answer. However, like Q points out, our exploration is not out there mapping stars, but "exploring the possibilities of existence", I think that is more important and the stories implications on choices is far more interesting than an easy answer.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Sun, Jul 2, 2017, 9:39pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Course: Oblivion

@Tyler,

The point is sometimes pointless, like Time Travel Episodes "Yesterday's Enterprise" did it matter that "alternate" Picard sacrificed his entire crew and ship to save a ship from the past that he had just hoped would "potentially" create peace between Federation and Klingons. When "real" Enterprise sees the Temporal rift closing, not realizing what he did to save the federation and billions of lives, did that not matter.

Voy "Course: Oblivion" and TNG's "Yesterday's Enterprise" comes from the same narrative branch of Star Trek "Alternate" possibilities storyline. Why do we consider TNG's episode classic for their sacrifice that no one will know about (even Tasha won't know since she's dead according to Sela) versus condemning voyager's episode for exploring a character story with the same alternate potential themes?

I'd argue that both episodes deserve equal eye of judgment for what it means as a story rather than judging it based on whether it is part of the main continuity or not, because as pointless as this episode might be, the same arguments could be used for Yesterday's Enterprise as well that many including Jammer and myself consider the epitome of classic Star Trek.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Sun, Jul 2, 2017, 9:23pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Second Skin

This was worth 4 out of 4 in my view.

Kira was submitted to nothing less than the same type of psychological mind games that Picard suffered in Chain of Command, which was also brought forth by Cardassians. The beauty of the Cardassians is their innate nature of using Orwellian type confusion tactics and visual dis-congruity to reshape the perspective and reality of the character into what they need.

Not only was kira fooled but we the audience were starting to believe it, perhaps Kira was the very thing she hates, perhaps DS9 was willing to take a character into a dark territory that would not get explored until JJ Abrams did in Alias, a decade later. Alas, there was not enough bravery for that even with Ron Moore and Ira Behr at helm, good idea, but they could have upended TV a lot earlier.

Still the lack of breaking ground does not prevent the episode from being great, it had all the right notes and the right misdirections to give us a good hour of entertainment.
Set Bookmark
Greattrekker
Thu, Dec 22, 2016, 8:59pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Once More Unto the Breach

In the end, Kor went out with a lot of class and gusto as a TOS alum and he actually got a mythic end.

I think Klingon stories are good, maybe overdone by the time of DS9 after decades with TOS/TNG/DS9's Klingon war arc. This is a Star Trek species of warriors with both brutality and nobility, like an ancient Greek myth. In terms of the overall story arc, I like how they handled it. Yes, there were faults, but nothing too severe and I appreciate less big CGI action instead a subtle and silent in Klingon terms memorial to Kor.

9/10

Set Bookmark
Greattrekker
Tue, Dec 20, 2016, 10:35pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Children of Time

To me this episode is probably my favorite of DS9, including the Episode In the Pale Moonlight.

It's true science fiction, an imaginative plot, and a love story that defies convention and even fate. Odo's love for Kira is poignant and potent, just like Kirk's love from the TOS episode "City on the Edge of Forever", but unlike Kirk, Odo does not have a cold logical Vulcan friend to keep him from making a morally dubious choice.

In that way, I think DS9 answered Harlan Ellison's classic with its own classic that reverses and parallels the issue of fate and love in time travel. However, DS9 showed that its voice is not as utopian and "greater good driven" as TOS, the voice of DS9 is a human story set in an alien cultural intersection.

10/10
Set Bookmark
Greattrekker
Sun, Dec 18, 2016, 10:04pm (UTC -6)
Re: Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

This was a good tie in movie for Episode 4, A New Hope, and adds a good bridge for Episode 3 Revenge of the Sith.

Seeing Anakin/Darth Vader in all his glory is a great plus for this movie. Seeing the death star operating at 1 reactor power was good too.

However, I do agree with others on here, the movie was plot driven, not character driven, so it lost some charm. I want to care about Jyn and the others, but the plot was more about the overall rebellion rather than an individual story.

To quote Jammer in his reviews, I'd consider this movie 70% set up for Episode 4, when Leia and crew were escaping Vader. As set up, after we know the results from history, I actually think the film producer did a good job. It's weakness is that we lack tension in the end, we know that Luke, Leia, and Han would come along to save the day eventually in the follow up movie from 1979 Star Wars, so everyone's sacrifice is already paid in full.

This is a morality tale, if you do the right thing despite all odds, the universe/Force will make sure you get your rewards. That's what "Rogue One" basically becomes, it's a futuristic fable that we already know the moral implications and conclusions about.

I thought Star Wars Force Awakens was a better movie overall attempting both new things and set up new arcs.

Rogue one is set up for a conclusion we already know will happen, but it is done wll and fits into the overall story.

I'd rate this 3 out of 4, good, but nothing we have not sen before.

Set Bookmark
Greattrekker
Sat, Dec 17, 2016, 4:06pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S3: Scorpion, Part I

Species 8472 had a good intro that just were never followed through sadly

As an intro, this episode served Voyager well, I'd have preferred Ensign Kim to actually die off (gives viewers a bit more stake and hatred for the new villain to kill a core cast member).

The planet killer, "cough" Babylon 5 "cough", was a good piece of imagery to demonstrate the power of these new aliens.
Set Bookmark
Greattrekker
Sat, Dec 17, 2016, 3:54pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Course: Oblivion

@Muninn

Completely agree that this episode is for the Cynics like Year of Hell Part 1

Voyager should have tragic baggage, after all those years of space battles, mind control, and borg attacks, people died non-stop. the ship should be a grim graveyard to remember those we have lost and serve to inspire those that remain.

Of course, I am also a fan of the Walking Dead, which take this bleakness to a whole new level that most commentators on the site would likely be less inclined to favor.
Set Bookmark
Greattrekker
Sat, Dec 17, 2016, 3:41pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S3: Remember

@Yanks,

When you stare into the darkness, make sure it does not stare back at you.

This episode of Star Trek represents what happens to society in denial of itself and its reality. None of the elders in the Enaran delegation wanted to accept that the price of their progress was mass murder or genocide, but hope it would slip through as a forgotten footnote of history. As a parable, not only can it apply to Germans and Japan during World War II, it can be applied just as harshly to United States with the extermination of Native Americans or United Kingdom in its desire for a global empire.

Also, I never doubted Trump could win and my politics is conservative (but not populist). I do believe in stronger border security, tighter controls against Islamic extremism, and stronger military. Yet, I don't favor outcasting certain groups, religious, or philosophical groups, despite deeply disagreeing with liberals on economic and security issues, I would not have it any other way as a check and balance is what make America great, rather than uniform society.

My interpretation of Star Trek is that even in the best future for humanity and other alien worlds out there, we all still retain certain philosophical and ideologicl differences based on our positions and our choices, i.e. Civilian scientists will hold different views to Starfleet officer versus Maquis Farmer/rebels.

Set Bookmark
Trekker
Sat, Oct 1, 2016, 5:23pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: Q Who

This is a classic episode and deserves full marks for good reason, a true original that open the doors to many other stories down the line.

Most people don't read the novels post TNG/DS9/VOY, but I like the take on the Borg, except for Voyager novel with Janeway's stupid death.

Q is actually trying to help humanity in this initial encounter, giving the Enterprise a clear first contact with the Borg, not in our own backyard, but in the Delta Quadrant itself. It's semantics, but it could have been the key factor for why the Borg invasion did not occur earlier in Season 2/3 and it gave people like Commander Shelby a chance to prepare along with others in Starfleet, I wonder what Section 31 would have done at the last moment if the Enterprise didn't stop the cube in BoBw-2 (probably throw out a planet killer to take on the cube or launch a protomatter bomb).

Also to address an interesting discussion from years back on this blog, the novels explained a reason why Q do not judge theBorg in the same way they do other species. In the Novel series Canon, Destiny Series, the Borg originated from a species called the Caeliar, who have mastered the control of Omega molecules, the very essence of what created the universe itself. Basically, we're talking God-Like equivalent species, so the Q Continuum would not have oversight over another advanced civilization's messes, they got their screw ups and others have their problems. The Q, specifically De Lancie's Q and maybe even Graham Q from Voy Death Wish, though are guiding mankind on a path and destiny towards some kind of future, potentially to the same state of evolutionary advancement, so their interest only intersect up to a certain point as teachers.

Even the novels don't explain everything, there's a lot of guesswork in Star Trek and we can argue for eternity or into "Forever" without a clear answer as to the Borg or what Q intent was.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Sun, Sep 11, 2016, 7:28am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

Dougie: Well, Enterprise's final season had success by going in that direction leading, sadly unseen, to the Earth Romulan War. Romulans were always good for cloak and dagger story-lines (a familiar face with an emotional response), which I guess a sizable population enjoy along with me (*cough* Game of Thrones *cough*).

As for other species, I really wish the Gorns would be seen again (Lizard suits aside :P ) as TNG and onward does not mention them again.

The Gorn probably are a shoe-in for re-introduction, they need a better backstory and Lizard people are under-represented.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Sat, Sep 10, 2016, 10:53pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

karatasiospa, you're right Menagerie was the Trial Episode with Pike in a wheelchair.

The Cage, the original pilot, was the one where Pike was Captain, 10 years before Kirk.

Balance of Terror, eh...really:

Maybe the development of Plasma Torpedoes, or the Earth Outposts along the Neutral Zone, maybe even the reason why the Romulans crossed the Neutral Zone after 100 years of silence.

I would love to some more Vulcan/Romulan intrigue being built up.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Tue, Sep 6, 2016, 11:56pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: Pen Pals

Tin Man-

I agree that intervention is necessary sometimes, but it is haphazard.

World War II is the best example of US intervention for a positive cause, but recent history has shown that intervention may not always lead to positive outcomes.

I won't even go into the quagmire issues of Iraq, which is well documented by groups of both sides of Liberal and Conservative factions as a mistake (Blame Obama or Bush more, it's still the same war).

I think a perfect counter example to World War II is the Bosnian War of the late 1990's. The US prevented a genocide by Milosevic of ethnic groups, including the eastern European Muslims. We did a good thing and people thought, we just stopped Muslim Holocaust in 1995.

However, what the US and the world had not known at the time was that Pakistan's military and intelligence had been supporting Eastern European Muslims with arms and intelligence assets for geopolitical positioning. At the same time, extremist factions and terrorist groups had gained sympathizers within Pakistani government (let's be honest, Bin Laden couldn't have lived close to a decade in a well armed compound without some support within Pakistan), these terror groups in turned gained supporters and strategic assets from this victory.

IF we knew what we do now 20 years after the Bosnian war, ask yourselves should we have intervened and stopped the genocide there, or allow Milosevic to remain and continue his reign to create a buffer zone between the West and the Middle East.

I am not saying it was wrong to stop mass murder, but we know that inaction could save lives as well down the road, so it's really hard to tell if intervention is right or wrong without the effects being known.

Set Bookmark
Trekker
Tue, Sep 6, 2016, 10:59pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

There are other possibilities from 23rd Century:

Here's a few more:

1. Talos IV incident, a famous issue 10 years before TOS, which we only got a brief glimpse of during the trial sequence in "The Cage".
2. Another incident in the 23rd century, James T. Kirk is in Starfleet Academy in the prime timeline at this point in history and entering service as an Ensign (Now that would be sweet to see a young James T. Kirk being mentored by the main female Commander character). IT was established in TOS episode "Shore Leave".
3. IF they go back to the 2240's, not 2250's, there's an even better set up: TOS episode "The Conscience of the King", Kodos the mad Eugenics based governor of Tarsus IV could be a forefront of the arc. Also, a child age James T. Kirk can make a nice appearance as he was one of survivors of the genocide of Tarsus IV.

The name Trekker isn't a moniker, I know my Trek History pretty well even if I began in the 90's. The old series to me is dated and flawed in so many degrees, but I do pay homage to its ideas that inspired TNG, DS9, voyager, and the last season of Enterprise.

There are things we can explore from this period of Trek history, not to mention that the Enterprise and Constitution-class starships began around this period long before Kirk, Spock, McCoy, and company came into their own.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Tue, Sep 6, 2016, 9:57pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Measure of a Man

Um....Wow, even though I understand what each of you are arguing, I am quite baffled at how far scientific and philosophical debate meanders into Quantum theory.

For me this episode was a great viewing pleasure, it touched on ethics of artificial life and the concepts of "responsible use", which is a term that is now frequently applied in the field of information technology and business for applications. Even on a technology use level, the ethics are very interesting.

Data is more than a machine or a program, but is he sentient?

If we apply the Turing tests to Data, based on famed Father of Modern Computing, Alan Turing, we may be looking at this episode in another angle.

At the start, the poker game demonstrates Data has limitations to his understanding of intuition and human behavior. It makes sense to judge him as merely a machine, not a sentient being.

Yet, Data has over this episode demonstrated self-preservation instincts and even intuitive concepts of racism. I loved the scene in Picard's ready room:

--------

Capt. Picard: Data... I understand your objections. But I have to consider Starfleet's interests. What if Commander Maddox is correct? There is a possibility that many more beings like yourself can be constructed.

Lt. Commander Data: Sir, Lieutenant La Forge's eyes are far superior to human biological eyes, true?

Capt. Picard: M-hm.

Lt. Commander Data: Then why are not all human officers required to have their eyes replaced with cybernetic implants?

[Picard considers this shortly, then looks away without giving an answer]

Lt. Commander Data: I see. It is precisely because I am *not* human.

----------

That exchange is worth the episodes labyrinth of legal arguments and philosophical issues over life and sentience, because at the very core of this episode, we can see Data is a sentient being; perhaps not yet fully capable of intuition or human answers consistently that Turing would have wanted for intelligence, but Data does demonstrate intuition and human-like associations with his current issue.

I also think in addition to all of our arguments here, we should also ask a deeper question about Star Trek's Federation and this "Brave New World". Over the decades, we have seen the problems of this galactic power from a deaf ear to humanitarian needs in the name of a Prime Directive on some occasions, then a willful abandonment of it if it is advantageous.

Has humanity really grown beyond bigotry, selfishness, and settled for peaceful exploration of the stars?

I think if anything our bigotries and selfish instincts are still very clear in the reflections of the leadership of Federation and Starfleet, not to mention all the species that composed the federation, who would prejudge a being that has served its institution as merely an asset, when the situation is more advantageous.
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Mon, Sep 5, 2016, 1:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

Here's Screenrant link on the name "Discovery":

screenrant.com/star-trek-discovery-title-explained-bryan-fuller/

Star Trek's new incarnation could be interesting, I've been watching Trek since the 90's and I am used to Arc stories from DS9, along with Babylon 5.

The Sheliak incident would be a likely culprit, but there are other even more dramatic incidents in Trek lore in the 23rd century aka "Omega" molecule creation., which despite what novels will tell ou did occur in the 23rd century without a real canon date. (Personally after the games, I think Omega has been overused and hope it's not in this series. Cool concept, but too overused.)
Set Bookmark
Trekker
Mon, Sep 5, 2016, 11:29am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: The Void

@Yanks:

It's the wrong categorization between communism and what happened in this episode. Liberals tend to ascribe too many ideas on sharing and mutual cooperation to Socialism and Communism, instead the terms are only true for macro-state/social systems of development rather than individual concepts. Think of this Yanks as Christian concept of "fellowship" as in classical Christian interpretation of the 12 apostles, if you want a Conservative approximation.

For me as a progressive realist, it is quite logical o share resources if the different resources can be used to reach an ultimate goal. As the basis of Industrial theory, "specialization" of labor and parts form the core concepts from which odern Civilization can trace its roots. There is nothing "commie" or socialist about it, just a reality of modern society and progress. If I grow apples worth $1.00 a bushel + have eggs worth $0.25 a dozen and you grow wheat worth $0.50 a bushel + have cows with milk worth $0.50 a gallon, but an apple pie is worth $6.00, then why shouldn't we cooperate and make apple pie.

If you believe that trade is socialism and Communism aka Trump movement of 2016, (Modern American reactions to trade and resource management are quite idiotic and simply incoherent from a Conservative perspective as well), I must say that you have no solid ground to stand on. Trade and resource allocation is not fair, it is necessary to reach our goals as a society to keep Civilization running. Some people will make more, some less, some will get promoted without merit, and other remain stagnant even with capability.

Star Trek's Federation is a socialist ideal state, there are things about it that we want to reach (Technological Singularity, Peaceful Co-existence), things that will never exist (Utopian distribution of goods/resources), and other things that are contradictory to economic form (Latinum, scarce resource allocation, social structures with human dominance).

Set Bookmark
Trekker
Mon, Sep 5, 2016, 12:35am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Friendship One

Personally, 1/2 star rating for me.

I really hate this episode after watching One Small Step, then this episode you can see how hamfisted Voyager's writing became at the end. Janeway's little speech was just bad: anti-Trek, anti-space exploration, and anti-human sentiment despite mourning a dead crew member.

We also learn nothing about these aliens, surely they were around the same tech level as 20th Century Earth. They had radar and ICBMs, our theoretical physicist had already been dreaming up potential for anti-matter back then, aka where Gene Roddenberry got his idea for TOS in 1960's.

It shows a sad element in Star Trek, the tech level and physics capability of species don't match up, its a plot contrivance at its worst.
Next ►Page 1 of 4
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2017 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.