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RandomThoughts
Tue, Mar 28, 2017, 9:08pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Arsenal of Freedom

Hello Everyone

I always thought the machine started at its lowest level when against a newer foe. It had to learn their strengths, weaknesses, and capabilities, then would level up in a appropriate manner. If the Ferengi had landed, it would have started off the same, then gone off in a different direction. Same with Klingons or Romulans. It would eventually decide how much power was needed to defeat/kill the newcomers, and used no more than that.

No matter how smart Geordi and the Enterprise got in defeating one of the weapons in orbit, the machine would just program another machine to defeat them the next time, or come close to it. Then a better weapon would appear based on the information from the previous one.

If our intrepid band of heroes hadn't told it they were intent on buying one, it would have continued to display its weaponry and destroyed them all. The hologram did say it was a learning machine.

Actually, I'd have thought this would have had the weapons designers of Starfleet salivating for years. With just a few tweaks (don't kill the folks that designed you), something like this would be able to defend just about any Federation planet from invasion, forever. And for the larger/more important planets (Earth, Vulcan, etc.), they'd just give it more power to do whatever it wanted/needed to do. Of course, it might have destroyed the solar system to defeat the Borg, but what a show it'd have been...

Too bad when one of the shows went back to Earth, on a somewhat war-time footing, they didn't show a few of them floating around in the background, on partol at Starfleet...

Regards... RT
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 5:58pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: In Theory

What always got me was that Jenna liked Data for who he normally was, but once they started "dating" he wrote a program that altered his behavior (in pretty creepy ways, IMO) and that program lead ultimately to her ending it. He is capable of having "friendships" without acting too strange so if he had approached this as just another relationship things might have turned out differently.

For Jenna's part I have no idea what she was thinking, were her experiences with men really so bad that she decided to try robosexuality? I guess after her bad experiences she might see Data as a "safe" choice because deep down she knows he's not capable of getting emotionally invested, and that he'd be straightforward with her and not cheat or play games. If Yar had spread around rumors after their liaison I could see some of the crew members pursuing him out of curiosity (or maybe not, I'm sure the holodeck could do a lot better) but Jenna seemed only to be seeking emotional intimicy (something she knew he couldn't give her), not a physical relationship. I've never bought any of Data's "romances" with humanoids (Yar comes close but that's because it wasn't really "romance") and want to see him try pursuing a relationship with, say, the ship's computer or another robot (he has shown to have a greater affinity for other machines than even his closest "friends").

Maybe we should be grateful the relationship never took a physical turn, but at the same time I was curious as to how that would play out if it had. How does Data feel about being "fully functional" when it's such a useless "function" for him to have? What was Soong thinking? Does this mean Lore is "fully functional" as well? Why are his robots even anatomically correct? The implications are so hilarious and disturbing I'm (not quite) sorry it wasn't brought up again.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 3:56pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

Picard is so old, sending him on a black-ops mission seemed kind of odd, even of he was an expert in the technobabble of the week. His explanations to the others were so simple they could have easily trained someone more fit for the task to go. Having Crusher there was laughable, shouldn't they have brought an expert on bio-weapons instead, or at least a more action-oriented character? Worf I could understand, but a giant Klingon isn't exactly sneaky. (Fiction always likes to have the laughably unrealistic premise of 6'+ guys somehow fitting into and crawling through tiny spaces though.) This was just a setup to get Picard in a tormented position again, because Patrick Stewart is so good at being tortured. (Between this and BoBW how is Picard not mentally fractured beyond repair or at least severely PTSD?)

I loved Jellico telling Troi to put a real uniform on. Those onesies made her look UGLY, they cut into her in all the wrong places and made her figure look terrible, she looks like a real babe in normal clothes. Now maybe the character can finally get some respect.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 2:56pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Rascals

The boy playing young Picard was dreadful - very wooden, and he sounded like he had a different British accent than Picard (or maybe his inflection was really just that off). That makes the episode very hard to watch, this kid didn't convince me he was Picard. The girl playing young Guinan was good, though, and the other two were passable. (The Ro girl was unpleasantly shrill, but I think that was just her voice).

Is it just me or was one of the ferengi (the engineer?) played by a woman? That would be a hilarious meta bit of irony, having members of this incredibly misogynistic species depicted by women, and would make sense cast-wise since ferengi are short.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 5:39am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: True Q

@Luke

I'm not a fan of unnecessary regulation, but I think in the case of environment it's warranted. Lots of people don't care about the environment because they're either idiots or they'll be dead before what they're doing has a big enough impact to effect them. I don't think holding manufacturers to a certain standard or even mandatory recycling is necessarily a bad thing. (You might be saying "whoa, what right has the government to tell me what to do with my garbage!?" but they already do tell you what to do with it, littering is a crime and it must be taken to the dump or gotten rid of some other way on your own private land. Requiring you to sort and place your trash in different areas of the dump is also required so having you place some of that trash in recycling instead isn't that much more work. Curbside recycling is just as convenient as curbside trash.)
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 4:57am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: A Fistful of Datas

Normally I'm childishly amused by such things, but Data-in-drag was a thing of horrors. (Don't get me wrong it was hilarious in its own way, just in the way that makes you scream/yell incredulously instead of laugh.) Worf and I had the same look on our faces as we realized the program might not end until he kissed the love-interest. Wish this had followed up with an episode or two of Worf being very avoidant to an increasingly puzzled android.

I kept wanting Worf to shoot one of the Datas just to see what would happen to it. (Would the holo deck simulate blood, would it "die", or would it just be mildy annoyed with a hole in it?) Or alternately, go around turning them all off (surely the chief of security knows about the odd off switch by now for safety reasons after Data's taken over or otherwise been a major threat to ship multiple times?)

Glad to see Troi out of the sausage suit and doing something cool for once, even if it wasn't much. (She looks so terrible in that suit, I cheered when she was ordered to put on a proper uniform a few episodes after this (and I miss the weird manskirts background characters wore in the first season.))

Also, "y'all" is a contraction of "you all", but no one called Data out on this because "it's Western" and he can apparently speak all languages perfectly except English (he speaks "Western" just fine, though). I doubt those Christmas lights in his head are as efficient as he claims they are if holodeck characters have a better grasp of language than he does.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 4:06am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: The Quality of Life

Terrible episode. Once again one of the mains is allowed to violate orders with zero repercussions, not even a slap on the wrist. Glad to know that Data finds "possible" life to be of greater value than the lives of his captain and best friend. He'd probably abandon his stupid quest for humanity at the first chance to join the robot uprising. Where's his sense of duty to Starfleet and his fellow officers? The implications of how untrustworthy Data is are astounding but of course will never be addressed. I'm not sure the episode realizes how sinister Data comes off, but it does lead me to doubt he's as benevolent to his creators as he lets on. Maybe he's only out there with them to find a robotic race to join. Though Data is accepted and treated as a Starfleet member, his willingness to abandon that for any old toaster that reminds him of himself is both chilling and foolhardy.

The exocomp design is so bad, it looks like it belongs on TOS. Can't believe something so cheap and fake was unironically used in a TV show during the 90s. Even Red Dwarf had better designs, and they were meant to be a parody of old cheap-looking crap sci-fi!

Also, and I know all Trek writers failed even middle school science, but viruses aren't considered life.

I think it's pretty stupid that Trek expects humans not to value their own species above others yet depicts Data doing the exact same thing in a positive light.

I agree with what others have said, Data is way too emotional and unobjective in this one, to the point of making some very irrational and selfish choices. I know he's never been as truly emotionless as claimed but he usually operates with a bit more sense and logic than this.

Even if the exocomps are "sentient" (and the episode made no good argument they were, which is probably why I dislike the episode so much (well, that and Data being a traitor and getting away with it (objecting is one thing, but mutiny is unacceptable, if he had been able to talk his way through instead I'd probably be ok with the episode despite the lack of convincing argument))) there's not a good reason to assume they're "enslaved". They're programmed to serve a purpose and are fulfilling that purpose, and for a machine (and even for men) what could be a greater life than fulfilling your purpose? Data and everyone else are anthropomorphicizing these bots in assuming they are all unhappy just because they were never given a career choice. (Funny that Data himself is doing so, doesn't he realize not all robots are made in the image of man and designed to think and act like man the way he is?) Indeed, the one that broke its own control circuits to avoid being ordered where it would get blown up later restored the circuit so it could be remote controlled again! If it were unhappy being a tool wouldn't it instead leave the circuit broken and go off doing whatever it pleased rather than making itself serviceable again? It could have attempted to communicate in some way to prove its sentience, but made zero attempt to do so. It was happy to continue its work, it just didn't want to blow up. The doctor had the right idea of just being "more careful" with them in the future, becoming useless would certainly not make the little bots happy. (Data is always searching for a sense of purpose, you'd think he of all people would put his personal feelings aside and understand this.)

Conversely, if the one that had blown itself up HAD done so out of a sense of despair, then that proves these little tools made to use screwdrivers in tight spaces were already (quite implausibly) MUCH more emotionally advanced than Data (a robot designed to actually be human-like, albeit without emotions (possibly as a safety procedure after the predecessor turned out emotionally unstable)) in terms of emotional ability and thus actually MORE sentient and human than he was. If Data had realized this I doubt he'd be so gungho to save them (his reaction to Locutus calling him "obsolete" was to take off his arm after all, and he fixated on Lore's supposed superiority for whole seasons, he doesn't seem to like being made to feel like an inferior piece of technology).

I don't really understand the "we love cats and dogs, but enjoy steaks at the same time" argument to say we are somehow worse creatures for it. We are animals, omnivores, and like it or not we need to eat other animals in order to survive. A cat or dog has no problem killing and eating a rabbit after torturing and terrorizing it for their own amusement, and while I know there are some sick people out there who probably do wound an animal and enjoy its suffering most people try to kill pretty quickly when hunting, rather than toying with a dying animal for hours and then leaving its mangled body to suffer a slow death because we were bored and needed the stimulus. I'm not saying that cats/dogs are evil (or that all humans live up to our own moral standards, although most probably are mostly capable of it if they choose). Animals don't function at the level we do, and concepts such as "good" and "evil" are beyond them. You can train your pet not to do these things, but you cannot teach it that doing so is "evil", just that it displeases you. Animals are often more intelligent than we give them credit for and are capable of nuanced relationships with each other and even other species, but they don't have the capacity to sit down and look at themselves and ask "is what I'm doing good or evil?" Even if they had the language to express such a sentiment the concept is entirely foreign to them and I'm doubtful even something as intelligent as a gorilla or dolphin could be taught to truly grasp the concept (maybe "good" and "bad" as in "this is pleasing" and "this is not pleasing", but not a greater, actual sense of morality). Animals are known to behave altruistically and selflessly, as well as to do terrible things, but in the end neither proves they have a morality. Humans however do have a sense of morality, of good and bad, and have the power to change their environment. That's why we should (and I'd even say it's our responsibility to do so) take good care of other creatures and our planet, because we are aware of ourselves and what is right and wrong, and can kill our prey with as little suffering as possible, and maintain our natural resources wisely. I know a lot of eco-nuts would just say we're a cancer on the planet and should off ourselves, but we deserve to live just as much as any other animal. (And I know someone is probably going to mention relativism and how "good and evil are totally subjective, man", but I'd argue that objective standards can be reached based off of our own knowledge and studies, for example, "raping someone harms their body and mind and so shouldn't be allowed", "animals feel pain so we should take care to minimize their suffering", etc etc.)

@John Oct 13 '15

It's late and your description of the whole situation and what you'd do in Riker's position has had me in stitches for at least 5 minutes. Kudos
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Outsider65
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 1:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Time's Arrow, Part I

I have to note the similarities and differences between Data's desire for death in this episode and Asimov's character's desire for death in The Positronic Man (I believe that's the name of the story I'm thinking of? It's been years since I've read that story and even longer since I completely watched through the almost unwatchable TV adaptation, "Bicentennial Man". (I'm not a fan of Robbin Willliams, his way of speaking and acting in pretty much everything I ever saw/heard him in always made me feel very embarrassed by/for and very bad for him, as though he hated himself and was willing to do any humiliating or self-defacing thing to make me laugh. I felt like I was watching a man with little to no self respect/esteem torture himself for my amusement, it's very hard to watch. Given how things turned out I wonder if my feelings weren't too far off the mark, poor man.)

Data makes for a poor Bicentennial Man. Given what I remember of the story, in that one the robot chose to die so that he would be granted human status. In this episode Data is happy to learn he will die because it makes him feel closer to his human companions. In Asimov's story it makes sense, because the robot has done everything possible to make himself as human as possible, and dying from old age is just the final step. It makes less sense for Data to want to die, especially since his death is not a natural one (despite what he claims unless he's replacing/upgrading his parts as he goes along he will wear out and naturally "die" some time in the distant future) but shown to be a seemingly violent end. For all he knows he may be no more long lived than a humanoid like Guinan, not knowing the length of his life-span hardly means he's immortal and is a really illogical conclusion for him to come to. Even if he was "immortal" he's still obviously able to be destroyed, just like anything else. If existing indefinitely truly disturbed him enough that finding his own remains comforted him, he could have just as easily decided that one day he will have himself destroyed (I don't recall any of his programming making him unable to do so). There are species in Star Trek that do appear to live forever, like the Q, so fixating on having a death at all reflects his desire for humanity, rather than a desire for becoming "alive". It is an interesting look at the character, but really cements how odd some of his conclusions are.

@Ross I don't remember the exact lines, but it's possible Whitley was a secretary or the like, and thus while frequently talked to wasn't important enough to be introduced by name or was introduced by first name only. I'm not saying they didn't fudge it with Data (they do slip up and I think someone mentioned Spiner would ocassionally throw in some contractions just to see if they'd catch it (they didn't)) just that we could probably imagine a plausible explanation in this case.
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Outsider65
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 12:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Man of the People

I just realized Troi becoming "oversexed" actually makes sense given her rapid aging and Betazoid women's hyped up sex drive when they reach middle age. I loved how all her outfits looked like something her mother would wear. Not saying this was a great episode, I'm pretty sick of Troi getting mind raped, but it did have a few amusing moments.

I always got the impression background characters were trying really hard to ignore their superiors' embarrassing/inappropriate antics out of respect or fear, rather than being truly unreactive.
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Outsider65
Thu, Mar 23, 2017, 11:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Schisms

@ comments about Data and Pulaski (yeah I know I'm 5 years and 50 comments too late)

Pulaski didn't hate Data, though. Sure, she gave him a hard time (given her character's similarities to Bones' and Data's to Spock's she pretty much had to), but they were clearly friends and it was fun to see someone always putting him on his toes and challenging him. None of Data's other friendships had that nice back and forth, and it's not like he couldn't take a little ribbing (I don't recall her being actually mean to him at any point, either). I also liked her relationship with Picard, I could have totally bought it developing into romantic tension (personally I never saw any chemistry between Beverly and Picard).

Ok, the actual episode:

Why so many creepy episodes these last few seasons? Sure this one succeeded in being spooky but it always feels off to me when Star Trek tries to be The Twilight Zone. It's just so far from what they're usually off doing. Episodes like this just seem to clash with the worldview Trek usually puts on.

I did enjoy Data's poetry, especially the way he made sure to remind Riker to come. (I thought it was pretty brilliant, especially the first one that was probably describing an actual event (how many times in previous seasons did people ask Data to shut up in not so many words?), although the Spot one is a close second. I love little continuity nods like that, especially when they tie-in to character growth.) I wonder if anyone there was genuinely interested and didn't just come to avoid hurting his feelings, the whole room looked ready to fall asleep. I'm endlessly amused by the irony in that. I also enjoyed the scene where Geordi tries desperately to avoid hurting Data's non-feelings.

The rest of the episode, I'm not sure about. Like I said, I'm not sure how to take episodes like this.
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Outsider65
Thu, Mar 23, 2017, 10:24pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Relics

I hate how the writers and characters treated Scotty like he was some doddering old codger to be passed off to someone else at the nearest convenience - this is Scotty, for crying out loud! Scotty the miracle worker, Scotty who apparently wrote half the books on Starfleet engineering regulations! Geordi especially should have been hanging on his every word given how much Scotty's done, not snapping at him and sending him away. (This isn't the first time Picard has had to tell Geordi to play nice with someone, either. Geordi's generally a nice guy, but I'm noticing a pattern here...) The only characters who seemed willing to give Scotty the respect he was due were Picard and Data, and Scotty wasn't really interested in spending time with Data (given all the far more advanced androids Scotty encountered during his time with Kirk, I can't really blame him though, Data literally pales in comparison).

Scotty's been in stasis for 75 years and he came out alone as the only survivor of a deadly crash with the whole world now completely different, and other than Data creeping up on him at the bar and giving him a proper drink (Data's polite to everyone though, so that hardly counts) the only person even willing to sit down and talk with him is Picard. If this were some one-off character you could bet they'd be making a big deal out of this and would all be clamoring to listen to what he had to say and help him adjust to modern times. It's appalling.

I also hate how they robbed Scotty's character of all initiative. He's a captain and an engineering genius, and instead of giving him a ship or a place at Starfleet doing engineering research they make him content to take a shuttle craft and wander aimlessly completely alone, probably to just crash somewhere else and die for real this time. Not a very satisfying sendoff for an iconic and beloved character.
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Outsider65
Thu, Mar 23, 2017, 2:15am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: I, Borg

I kind of wanted to see Data interact with "Hugh" at least once. It could have been interesting (or maybe I just wanted a repeat of Data ripping off "Locutus'" arm when he called him obsolete).
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Outsider65
Thu, Mar 23, 2017, 12:46am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: The Most Toys

A really interesting episode with a truly despicable villain. The gradual revelations of the depths of the villain's depravity work well. It's chilling and a little heart-breaking seeing what even Data can be driven to do with enough mistreatment.

I have to wonder at all the comments explaining Data doesn't have emotions and then using words like "confusion" and "patience" to describe his actions during the episode. I think it's clear that while Data doesn't have "emotions" as such, he does have feelings after a fashion - he's clearly stated this several times, as him "being used to people" and even "missing" them as well as "being accustomed to their presence" and even sort of looking forward to being with them. He is not completely emotionless like, say, the ship's computer. Data is sentient and naturally has some degree of feeling as a result, even if he's designed specifically to not have emotions in the way most humanoids in the series do (given how cuckoo for cocoa puffs Lore turned out, this is an infinitely good thing), he is not strictly devoid of all feeling either (because a character like that would be boring and you couldn't do much with it).

Data's lie of omission at the end was very interesting. It can be seen as self-preservation or doing it for the greater good but either way it's showing us he's capable of deception. He's more of a potential danger to the Enterprise than even the holodecks, and has proven to be so on several occasions. The Enterprise is just lucky he likes them, or they'd be royally screwed.

And as for people saying Vulcans don't lie, what are you talking about? They lie all the time! How many times do they claim to be emotionless shells only to be proven wrong later? Sure, they mostly believe their own lies, but they're nonetheless still lying. They'll even lie when the truth is obvious. (How many times in TOS did McCoy or someone else point out something emotional Spock did only for Spock to flat-out deny it? Same with Sarek.)
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Outsider65
Wed, Mar 22, 2017, 10:22pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Time's Arrow, Part I

I'll admit I enjoyed this two parter despite the holes (when has an episode of Trek not had holes? As long as the episode is entertaining I can usually forgive them).

The 19th century scenes did drag a bit, especially when Twain was talking (was it really necessary for him to have so much dialogue?) but I appreciated a lot of the gags, and the way Spiner really played up being disturbed at finding the head (a much better likeness than the model from 1st season) piqued my interest enough that I actually jumped at the reveal. (I'm usually childishly entertained by the weird faces he's always making, but at the same time have to wonder why he's so much better at portraying subtle emotions than most of the other crew. It's always a bit jarring when he actually plays a scene straight and makes Data act as emotionlessly as he's supposed to be as a result.) The description of the aliens was much creepier in my mind than the lame way they actually appeared, but TNG aliens are almost exclusively humanoid so I shouldnt have expected anything different.

It was kind of a cop-out for Data's head to be "dead" this episode but able to be reactivated and immediately put back on duty in the next (it's been shown to be able to function fine while removed before so you'd think they'd have tried reactivating it and asking it what happened to it... No wait, that would draw too much attention to the paradox of it existing in two places at once, I guess). Picard being willing to fry the aliens for poaching Earth was a nice change from his usual hand-wringing about self-defense.

I wish there was more explanation of Picard and Guinan, is this really supposed to be the only basis for their "closer than lovers, closer than family" relationship? I was expecting some great adventure together, not a happen chance meeting with barely any interaction. And why do they automatically assume that Guinan is even older than she previously told them, when she could have time traveled there as well from a different point in the future? Anyway, like always lots of holes, but fun enough that I was mostly entertained.
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RandomThoughts
Wed, Mar 22, 2017, 5:47pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Home Soil

Hello Everyone!

@Trek

I have seen this three or four times over the decades, and I always thought it wasn't that they didn't understand the messages, it's they they didn't want to understand them. Because if they looked deeper, it might threaten their terraforming project. Perhaps not all of them, but some of them, turned a blind eye to the possibility. If they found something, all the work they'd done up to that point would be for naught.

Just a thought... RT
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RandomThoughts
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 11:11pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Cause and Effect

Hello Everyone!

@Outsider65

I saw Mr. Frakes at a Trek convention one time, and he had mentioned (might have been in answer to a question) that he was told to stand and walk that way early on. Something to do with him being taller than some of the other actors. So he always leans forward when he's walking, like he's about to break into a run, but doesn't. I always found it weird they asked him to do that. Oh, he also told us he had to wear a small hairpiece, to cover the bald spot that was slowly getting bigger as the years went on. :)

Now for sitting, I'd never really noticed. But he does seem to often sit leaning forward instead of sitting back.

Anyway, just thought I'd add my comment to the pile. :)

Regards... RT
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Outsider65
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 3:32am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Cause and Effect

Good thing Riker always feels the need to straddle/perch himself practically on the back of Data's chair every single time, or Data wouldn't have figured out his own clue. After about the second or third scene with the Ent blowing up I started to wonder how Ro would react to Riker trying that whole straddle/perch thing on HER chair. Presumably more uncomfortably than Data does. (Seriously, what's with the way Riker's always standing and sitting, did a venereal disease rob him off all ability to sit and stand like a normal human being?)
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Outsider65
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 2:52am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Unification

These episodes doesn't really make sense, but have a lot of really nice little moments. Data staring at Picard as he tries to sleep, Worf singing with the entertainer lady. I found those amusing.
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Outsider65
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 2:20am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Ethics

Beverly was very unethical here, wanting to hide the experimental procedure from Worf and force him to accept her less risky but less effective alternative. What gives her the right to make that call for him? As a patient it is his right to decide on what treatment he is given and he should be given all the options. I've never been a huge fan of "doctor" Crusher but this is a little much even for her. Why did no other character call her out on behaving so unethically?
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RandomThoughts
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 2:03am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Nth Degree

@K9T

Agreed. Gosh, what a great episode, and what great comments, until folks decide they are going to compare it to something that doesn't fit the episode or some certain agenda. Utopia then reigns of course.

Nuts to that. I so get tired of it. Head to the political boards folks. Please. There is, must be, a limit.

Otherwise, enjoy the day... RT
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Outsider65
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 1:23am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

I loved that Uncle Martin was the groundskeeper. Very fitting that he should still be hanging out on earth looking out for us foolish earthlings even after all this time.
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Outsider65
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 12:44am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Game

**Troi gave the headset to Beverly, nevermind. They don't seem to hang out much except to talk about their sexual conquests so it's actually very fitting Troi gave the orgasm game to Beverly. I still question why Geordi would be susceptible to it, though.
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Outsider65
Sun, Mar 19, 2017, 12:18am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Game

Sometimes I wonder how the idiotic Enterprise crew would ever survive without Data and Wesley to save the day. In all seriousness I found it implausible that no one besides Wesley even thought to ask questions before trying it. Beverly's always been incompetent so it's not a stretch to think she didn't, or that Riker forced it on her, but surely someone else would have? Geordi? How would the game even work on him if he's blind? Giving Wesley more than one other crew member working with him would have made this episode better, IMO.

Im once again struck by how normal and not weird Wesley's romances are in comparison to the other characters'. It's pretty sad that Wesley seems to be the only male character with normal romantic relationships. Looks like he really is the only one who doesn't have to find his women on the holodeck.

A highlight of this episode is Beverly forcing her kid to do drugs. That image alone makes the episode worth it.

They really ned to stop letting Riker vacation on Risa. This time he brought back more than just another case of space-AIDS.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 18, 2017, 11:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Ensign Ro

I'll admit, I hate Ro. I've never liked it when new characters came in and acted like they were hot shit and could treat the regular characters rudely, that's always been a peeve of mine. Any other grunt of the week would have been summarily put in their place but because the writers think this one's special she gets away with it.

It probably doesn't help that she was bitchy about her name (fuck off and learn English grammar, you don't see Keiko insisting on putting her family name first and then bitching about people getting her name wrong) and bitchy about wanting to violate uniform protocol (I'm sure Worf wasn't so rude about wanting a sash). I also never liked how she was obviously supposed to be "sexy" and got a special uniform in this episode with a removable top and short sleeves underneath. (Because tank tops are so sexy... Yeah, right, Star Trek. Wow, we got to see her boobs better and some bare skin, totally worth the special uniform. Not really.) We're also supposed to find her "tragic" but it's shoved down our throats just like with Yar. But Yar wasn't a crazy bitch with a petulant, childish attitude who deserved to be thrown in the brig for insubordination.

You can give a character a tragic backstory, that's fine, but don't present it to me as a sob story, like I should constantly be feeling sorry for them. Worf's backstory is arguable pretty traumatic but he's never presented to us in a "look how far he's come, the poor thing, you should really be amazed by the fact he's pulling it off at all, he's so strong but such a broken, fragile thing that needs protection because he's secretly so vulnerable" narrative like both Yar and Ro are. (I'd argue that Worf does have some of those traits, but the narrative never pushes us to see him through that lens, he's just that way.) If Ro were handled more like Worf, rather than being portrayed as a pushy wench who should get away with all the shit she pulls because the world feels bad for her, I probably wouldnt have much of a problem with her. I guess my issue with her is half how she acts and half how the universe reacts.

She also has too much unwarranted self-importance and is never shown to do or have done anything to earn it. Plus that wart on her chin grosses me out, but probably only because I hate her for other reasons.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 18, 2017, 11:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Conundrum

Data and Troi's chess game and her comment about intuition was obviously a callback to Kirk and Spock's chess games in TOS where Kirk apparently baffled Spock with his humaness or whatever. Maybe 3-D space chess is different than normal chess and really does require more than just logic and knowledge of the game to win, they're still claiming it does in this series so who knows. The point was that we got to see Data make a pretty cool drink for her and got to see them hanging out (maybe I'm in the minority but I do enjoy watching the characters interact as friends while off duty, that's one of the reasons I liked Pulaski so much, she integrated so well (that and Crusher always looks blitzed out of her mind)).
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