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Sven
Sat, Nov 18, 2017, 9:52am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Into the Forest I Go

Well, I have to admit that I am not entirely convinced of DIS as a series so far, particularly in regards to it being Star Trek and not just by name. I don't really 'feel' it, but both my 12 year old son and my wife are completely sold.

Regarding your reviews, Jammer, to paraphrase a Hollywood executive during an Academy Award ceremony in the late nineties: 'You keep writing them and we'll keep reading them'.
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Sven
Tue, Oct 31, 2017, 9:52am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Magic to Make the Sanest Man Go Mad

Weird how so many who hate DIS it and have left it 'for the garbage that it is', keep popping up to repeat their words the next week in various incarnations...
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Sven
Fri, Oct 27, 2017, 3:34pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Lethe

@ MadManMUC

Who the hell repeatedly watches a show (ENT) he or she deemed bad the first time of a franchise he or she believes is fucked. Come on, man. Leave the building and move on to something you do like.
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Sven
Fri, Oct 20, 2017, 3:26am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: Q Who

That ending. After seeing it nearly ten times, it still gives me the creeps.

Guinan putting it out there, almost shy. "Since they are aware of your existence..."
Picard's hesitation in moving the pawn, the sudden realisation of an awful truth. "...they will be coming."
"You can bet on it."
Picard taking it in for a moment and seamingly hiding nervousness standing up from of his seat.

Oh yeah, space will never be the same again.
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Sven
Sun, Mar 12, 2017, 12:18am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

Tony Todd lived a somewhat-troubled young life (Wash DC poverty, unspecified familial trouble, transplanted from parents to live with his aunt in urban Connecticut) -- he was steered into church, Boy Scouts, cinema and theater by his surrogate mother figure (Clara), and returned to Connecticut post-grad-school to teach drama for a while.

When his aunt died, Todd went into a multi-month depression, and withdrew from acting. This DS9 role was the first post-hiatus job he considered taking; after reading the child-continuing-without-his-parent script, he said yes, and brought much of his emotion into the performance, as sort of grieving homage to the woman.

I guess that's what makes The Visitor resonate so strongly with me -- the wrenching pain and monomaniacal fixation of a boy growing up without (and unable to let go of) his father. I agree that these interludes occasionally verge on melodrama, and that Avery Brooks' interpretation is uneven (weaker early on, strongest in the episode's final moments), but it is no less powerful for those wavering notes. Becoming a father myself has only made the episode's gut-punch that much stronger in subsequent decades.

Some might make the (valid) observation that "the emotionally-wrenching transformative timeline that never was" is an overused Trek trope. But, for my money, this one does it just as well as Inner Light, and just possibly moreso. Belongs right up there with Duet, Family, Pale Moonlight, etc.
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Sven
Sat, Mar 11, 2017, 1:42pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Quickening


Quite clear (to me) that these no-good-way-out medical and ethical storylines are the very best DS9 has to offer. In a greater cinematic/literary sense, one can see the early seeds of BSG's 2003 revival planted here. (As well as Ron Moore, naturally.)
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Sven
Sat, Mar 11, 2017, 1:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: Wrongs Darker Than Death or Night

This script was a hasty back-stage kludge -- the Season 6 storyline was supposed to be *Kira* having a romantic affair with Dukat (probably in the present day), which you can vaguely see hinted in the earlier wow-you're-a-nobler-character-than-I-thought and ouch-I-hurt-my-posterior and you're-incorrectly-using-the-dermal-regenerator buildups -- Nana Visitor rejected the storyline (justifiably, in my view), yielding an unpleasant creative standoff, until finally Ira Steven Behr came forward with "Okay, you don't sleep with Dukat, but your mother did." I would say this eleventh-hour backpedal shows through in the final product.
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Sven
Mon, Mar 6, 2017, 10:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Sub Rosa

Pretty sure I can prove the Anne-Rice-plagiarism connection.

The three emergent theories are that (a) freelancer "Jeanna F. Gallo" blatantly stole Anne Rice's intellectual property, or (b) freelancer "Jeanna F. Gallo" legitimately had no prior knowledge of Rice's work, or (c) freelancer "Jeanna F. Gallo" is in fact a pseudonym for Anne Rice herself, submitted either for anonymity, or possibly as part of a legal cover-up to give the author credit and enable some sort of hush-money payments.

But. Beverly Crusher learns her Scottish family originally had the matriarchal surname Howard (Beverly Howard, Felisa Howard, etc.), and the Howard bloodline has a familiar-spirit that clings to and romances them from generation to generation, etc. Beyond the existing Witching-Hour parallels, I think this subtle reference is actually most damning.

ANNE RICE'S FIRST NAME IS IN FACT HOWARD. HER DRUNKEN NE'ER-DO-WELL FATHER PLAYED A CRUEL JOKE ON HER IN THE HOSPITAL AND WROTE "HOWARD" ON HER BIRTH CERTIFICATE. THE PLAGIARIST AUTHOR HAS PUT AN(OTHER) ANNE RICE IN-JOKE (THE NAME "HOWARD") IN THE VERY SCRIPT ITSELF.

To me, this suggests that Gallo must have intentionally plagiarized, or (as I am coming to guess) Gallo is Ms. Rice herself. A person claiming to be Ms. Gallo commented on Internet review www.agonybooth.com/star-trek-the-next-generation-sub-rosa-part-1-1497 -- you'll have to scan this for yourself, but (to me) her prose reads remarkably similarly to Anne Rice's 2004 flame-war with dissatisfied book fans on Amazon.com.

As a final Easter egg: the writer's name, "Gallo," might (or might not) be evocative of "Gallopinto," a traditional RICE and beans dish. I think all of these little tongue-in-cheek references speak to an identity-coverup.
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Sven
Wed, Aug 19, 2015, 8:00am (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S3: Rajiin

This episode shows the equivalent of sending a spy to covertly find out what milk tastes like and then sending about fifty soldiers to break the spy out of prison while passing at least 10 milk bottles. Unless I'm missing something and there was a good reason to pass all those humans to find the person to learn you all about human physiology. Her cover is blown, so why bother freeing her. Just take the first five humans and go home for analysis. Oh well.
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SvenTviking
Wed, Jan 22, 2014, 3:54pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S1: Dear Doctor

Ok, here's my two pennyworth.

Firstly, Star Trek is entertaining TV fantasy drama. But it's lousey Science fiction. Apart from warp drive (which may actually,maybe,just possibly work) the things ST does to true science is what normally happens in an extreme porn film. This is because ST is mostly written by normal TV scriptwriters with a bit of help from the odd real sci fi writer or real scientist, who they mostly ignore for the sake of a good story. Now the problem with Hollywood scriptwriters is they do like to act the great philosopher and sci fi gives them lots of opportunity to do so. So, these half wits get involved with huge moral questions like the ones in "Dear Doctor" and then display their ignorance.

Now the great thing about TOS was the concept of the Prine directive and Kirk's attitude towards it. For Kirk, the Prime Directive was basic guidence, BUT reality, pragmatism and compassion ment that very often, he rightly ignored it.
When TNG came along, the prime directive was absolutely binding and going around it was almost a capital offence, federation PC. Reality, pragmatism and compassion went out the window.
Mix this worship of the prime directive with some Eugenics and bad evolutionary theory and you get the utter moral mess that is "Dear Doctor".

Consider this. We are trying to save and conserve the Giant Panda, even though it is an evolutionary dead end. Why? Compassion. We try to save primative tribes in the Amazon basin. They are threatened by being in the way of loggers and cattle farmers, as well as genetic susceptabilities to the deseases of modern man. Why? Compassion.
The morals of Dear Doctor say all these things should be allowed to die, that compassion should never count and should be ignored. People with no compassion have scientific names. Sociopaths and Psychopaths.

Now as old Flox uses very bad concepts of evolution (there is no genetic "judge" making judgements on who should live or die, there is certainly no genetic imperative for one race to get out of the way of another.) and a complete lack of compassion, what is he? Psychopath quoting bad science? Joseph Goebbels?

I've been checking out the forums and youtube comments pages to see peoples views on "Dear Doctor". It's about 20/1 negative with most saying the considered this episode "offensive" and "fascist". I agree totally and I think those who comment that Flox & Archer make the right decision really need to look at their own moral compass. Or see a analyst to see if they are psychopaths as apparantly there are quite a lot of them about.

If you want some good sci fi that deals with a "post scarcity society" like the Federation, may I recommend the "Culture" novels by Iain M Banks. The Culture is a vastly powerful advanced (Federation plus several thousand years) utopia with citizens living idyllic lives due to the brilliance of the technology. But it certainly has no prime directive. The prime directive would make a Culture citizen puke. There is only right & wrong, good or evil and the Culture WILL get involved, you just might not notice as they are very subtle. And frankly, The Culture is a lot more believable than the Federation.
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