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James Smith
Mon, Sep 25, 2017, 4:02am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Vulcan Hello / Battle at the Binary Stars

I tried to like it. I really did. I can deal with the JJ-Trek set design, I figured I could rationalise the Klingon makeup change, I even decided I could live with the ship designs being a) out of place and b) extremely ugly.

But I can't get past the fact that I don't like very many of the characters presented so far, especially Michael Burnham. This isn't a bash on the actress - Sonequa Martin-Green is great, but Burnham is monumentally bone-headed.
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Smith
Wed, May 24, 2017, 2:53pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

A lot of good points brought up about the show.

I would venture to say there is little continuity in Star Trek in general - most shows reset during the next episode with previous events/circumstances rarely brought up later in the series. I've also always had the impression that these episodes were written and spit out quickly under tight time constraints, so that there simply wasn't much time to sit around and think about the past history of characters (and Star Trek history) and how that would play into the present situation.

And of course, the show's entertainment value always trumps logical script-writing as well as any kind of scientific accuracy. That's television.

I would have to disagree that Jellico had an initial 'disdain for Riker'. From the moment he beamed on board, he seemed genuinely excited to work with Riker and the entire crew. It wasn't until he found out that Riker had neglected to carry out a specific request that his entire demeanor changed.

The conflict really seemed to surround the idea that it was Jellico's job to come onboard and immediately start preparing the ship in every possible way for combat. Rather than having outright disdain for anyone, he expected to have every order/request carried out without question, and immediately labeled someone as hostile if they showed any resistance. This may have been a failing on his part, having worked with diffiulct crews in the past during temporary missions, and transposing that hostility onto Riker for simply wanting to discuss the situation with him.

More than anything, it seemed he was expecting that, of all the crews he'd worked with, the flagship would be the easiest, full of top-notch officers who are ready to go above and beyond. When this does not occur (at least not up to his standards), that's when his disappointment begins.

Additionally, the attitudes of the crew certainly got to him as well. For example, rather than complaining and being outraged by the workload, if Geordi had said "Yes sir, I'll get right on that and do the best I possibly can to finish it in time", Jellico probably wouldn't have even cared if the job took longer than scheduled, as long as he knew that the crew had a great attitude and wanted to work hard.

This was why he immediately took so well to Data, and had him follow his run around the ship. It wasn't in Data's nature to complain, and instead simply calculate things coldly (like how long a job takes) without emotion or personal grievances.
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Smith
Fri, Apr 28, 2017, 8:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The Game

I always liked the obvious implications of "The Game" in modern society......just look around, everyone desperately staring at their smartphones, addicted to the quick highs and instant gratification of texting and games.

The problem with "The Game" is that they should have introduced it much more slowly, just like smartphones, so that by the time people caught on to what was occurring it had already overtaken society's social norms. At that point, it's not only built into the culture but also a 'social status' symbol, because heaven forbid someone catches you NOT looking at your phone and thinks you're unpopular.

Thanks for finally saying it out loud, Outsider65. I think the turbo lift scene basically told us exactly what the game gives people for completing higher levels and giving up control of their own mind. In that sense, it is actually a pretty bizarre scene when Beverly wants her own son to partake of the device.

What I always enjoyed about the episode was Wesley's brilliant play at misdirection, meaning that the entire chase sequence was simply done to give Data enough time to study the device and come up with a cure. I thought this was well written, particularly when it came to Data's entrance onto the bridge when it seemed Wesley was the only normal one left onboard.
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Smith
Thu, Apr 13, 2017, 2:47pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

I would say that on an officer level, they are usually transferred sideways to another unit after a promotion, usually because they need to fill a spot open, not because they're afraid of running a unit that they used to be a part of.

On the enlisted side, you run into those problems all the time. You have corporals who become sergeants and are now in charge of people they used to go drink with on the weekends, which is a major problem, and why fraternization has become increasingly against the rules in the modern military.

I agree with your take on the episode - Basically Jellico had high hopes for his tour with the flagship, and you could see the huge disappointment when he realized that certain members of the crew were in fact fighting him as opposed to helping him achieve his battle-ready goals.
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Smith
Wed, Dec 14, 2016, 2:18pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

Great points, Flying Squirrel.

Honestly, I don't actually know what modality Starfleet is actually supposed to represent. At one point during DS9 "Homefront", we actually get the notion for the first time that the Federation/Starfleet are two different entities, one representing the government, and the other representing the actual space-bearing military structure.

So I really cannot argue with your idea of a hybrid culture, since we are never presented with a solid foundation of what Starfleet actually represents in its entirety.

Riker is used to having Picard's ear and talking candidly - Now suddenly he gets "I don't want to talk about it, get it done" - It's a drastic change, but these are supposedly battle-ready officers who should be ready to adapt to any command style.

I realize you have to have drama in any given episode, but in reality it just doesn't make since for the crew to show that much resistance to a new command style - and they aren't being told to work their ass off simply out of a difference of style, it is all in preparation for a potential battle, which I would think they would all be on board with.

There is purpose behind everything Jellico is requesting - it's NOT just him being an a-hole.
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Smith
Tue, Dec 13, 2016, 6:06pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

I agree, there really was no reason for Riker to NOT be acting captain.

But at the same time, I was never really in agreement with how butt-hurt the crew was with a new Captain who happens to like things at a faster pace. Jellico was a war officer, who knows how to prepare for battle and is not obsessed with the 'pleasantries' that go along with a peace-based mission.

The crew was taken off guard, because they were used to a more lackadaisical command style from Picard. Boo-hoo, Troi has to wear an official uniform instead of one that shows off her cleavage.

Of course, I actually have military experience, and know what it's like to have the commanding officer interchanged with another, which happens every two years, and with which there is no going back. You either deal with it, or you will have serious problems.

Of course, you'll get no argument from me that the entire episode was bogus. Picard went on a mission, with the support of the stupid bimbo female admiral Nechayev , in which he was sent with the full knowledge and planning of the Cardassian empire. I'm sure in a Federation of 20 billion humans and one can only guess how many alien races, there were probably at least a thousand others familiar with Theta waves who could have gone on the mission instead. Joke.

The episode's main premise seamed devoted to the drama aspect of having a new captain, not providing an actual legitimate reason for Picard to leave the Enterprise.

But who cares......I enjoyed watching Jellico say basically "Stop complaining, get it done" over and over again.

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Smith
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 4:58am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

That was Nova squadron's punishment right out of the gate.....doors that don't automatically open....
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Smith
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 10:34pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: The Pegasus

Thanks, Chrome.

I'm still not sure if the trade off was worth it - Suffering through 2 hours of a boring, non-sensical script that was an insult to all things TNG just to gain technology already commonplace?

Hell, Janeway already brought them back transphasic torpedoes and armor hull plating before Nemesis even occurred, so that should have been the bigger breakthrough.

Who cares about cloaking with you have an armor hull that no current species in the alpha quadrant can shoot through (except maybe the Sheliak).

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Smith
Sat, Dec 3, 2016, 2:12pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: The Pegasus

What did the Romulans give up in the treaty?

They promised not to make a crappy movie with a bogus script about a boring clone who looks nothing like Picard, and a band of (somewhat) Romulan misfits who have no reason to be angry at the Federation at all.

Unfortuantely, in 2002 they broke the treaty and the movie got made.

Conclusion: Starfleet can now use cloaking technology whenever they want.
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Smith
Thu, Nov 24, 2016, 10:30am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

"Public opinion would've been on their side IF they were successful"

Yes, that has merit, especially when you go back and listen to all of Boothby's comments about Nova Squadron. Basically, they were considered super-celebrities on campus, so they were betting that the massive celebrating that would ensue would dwarf the one that Boothby talks about when "Nova Squadron won the Rigel cup", and this would put enormous pressure on the faculty to be lenient.

Whether that would actually happen or not is debatable, especially when you see what a hard-lined approach Admiral Brand took.

It was a gamble, and Locarno (as well as the others) may have been caught up in their own fame, and thought they could get away with almost anything. Wesley even alluded to this during his final speech to the inquiry: "We thought we could do anything".




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Smith
Thu, Nov 24, 2016, 12:33am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

I agree with Trajan's comment, thank you for finally pointing that out.

To me, this is a huge fallacy in the story. What was the plan if Nova Squadron HAD successfully completed the Kolvoord Starburst?

Everyone acts as if they would suddenly all be given a free pass as long as the maneuver was successful. As Picard put it: "Locarno would graduate a living legend".

But wait a minute - They all knowingly engaged in a highly dangerous and illegal flight maneuver. They all knowingly lied and filed a fraudulent flight plan.

Why would the academy ever let them fly again after a stunt like that? Their flight privileges would be revoked permanently, and they would have severe reprimands placed on their permanent records, which would follow them around everywhere. Good luck getting a captain to trust one of them at the helm of a ship after that.

Basically, it would have ruined their flight careers, their team would be disbanded, and Locarno might not have even been allowed to graduate at all.

So was it really worth it?

Chrome stated: "If the maneuver could have been performed safely in the 24th century, it may have shown Starfleet that the rule was obsolete".

Okay - They might eliminate the rule in the future, but that has no bearing on the present, where Nova Squadron willingly disobeyed a standing regulation that banned the maneuver.

As others stated, I also wondered where Troi was during this entire episode. Even non-betazoids could see that they were hiding something. Troi would have known instantly that they were all lying, and a great scene would have been Troi coming to Wesley's room and having a heart to heart discussion with him.
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Smith
Tue, Oct 11, 2016, 1:11pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Sub Rosa

I think most newcomers simply read a few comments from the top, and then scroll to the bottom and post something. I would bet that there are few that have the patience to read through the entire forum.

That being said, I agree with Robert. Don't feed the trolls.

Peace.
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Smith
Sat, Oct 1, 2016, 4:38pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Future Imperfect

The most GLARING plot hole (in my opinion) was Worf still being just a helmsman after 16 years.

Yes, someone else mentioned that many of the officers should have gone on to other things by now, but Worf's position was by far the most ridiculous, unbelievable part of this story.

Really? SIXTEEN years of additional Starfleet duty and Worf is still just a helmsman? And Riker doesn't even have one single reaction to it except to pat his chair when he sees him for the first time? That should made him very suspicious right away.

That was extremely lazy by the writers, as was the fact that they must have blew all their money on the futuristic Sick Bay set - so much so that they left the Enterprise bridge virtually unchanged with no advancements whatsoever.

I get that it's all supposed to be a fantasy created for him - but if Riker's mind gave him a futuristic Sick Bay, why not the rest of the ship including his quarters?

Was it really so hard to believe that Data could finally use the word "Can't" after sixteen years? (this was an idiotic idea from the start of the series - Data can use complex words in a poem about his cat, but is unable to use contractions??)

Also, the fact that the boy called the Romulan "Ambassador Tomalak" was extremely trivial, and shouldn't have been the event that smashed the house of cards. For all Riker knew, Tomalak had the boy call him that all along in case they needed to use him later. Again, just trivial.

I also liked how Riker saw Minuet perfectly a couple times in the video and had no reaction to it - but then the final time, he finally reacts to it..... And why the hell would it pick Minuet instead of Diana? Diana was actually real and IN HIS LIFE every single day. You would think she would have been much more prominent in his mind than a holodeck fantasy from years past....

You'd think they'd send an away team down at the end to take advantage of the advanced alien technology the boy used the whole time. But don't get me started on new technology suddenly being forgotten.....like Voyager returning home with transphasic torpedoes and armor hull plating, yet it's no where to be seen in Star Trek Nemesis. Lazy ass writers.....

All in all it's still a fun episode to watch. However, when you watch these things over and over again, you can't help but notice all of the errors and inconsistencies.

Lastly, this must have been a fun episode for Geordi. Levar Burton often said in interviews that it was a pain in the ass trying to walk around with the visor on, which he could barely see through. At least he got a break for a couple scenes.

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W Smith
Mon, Aug 29, 2016, 5:01am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

I guess time has been kind to STID in your eyes. STID was just awful. Yes, even worse than V and Nemesis. It's the only Trek I don't and won't own on DVD because it doesn't even feel like Trek. It's so full of plot holes and poor characterization that I don't know if I could even give it one star. I especially dislike what they've done with Spock in the Kelvin timeline turning him into an emo Spock.
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W Smith
Mon, Aug 29, 2016, 4:54am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek Beyond

Good to see Jammer back, but disagree with the movie assessments. STID was the worst of all Trek movies, even V and Nemesis at least felt like Trek STID was just cringe-worthy on so many levels: whitecasting Khan, ill-thought and executed homage, no exploration, huge plot holes, emo Spock and the silly romance, etc.). Beyond was good, but not great. Krall as the villain was lacking with a ridiculous motivation and back story. But at least the characters rang true, except for Spock who still feels off. Oh well... Trek is best on TV anyway so I look forward to what they bring in Discovery.
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john smith
Fri, Oct 2, 2015, 2:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: Behind the Lines

I think it would make more sense for the female changeling to impersonate Odo in the final scene when Kira talked to him, so that when Odo regain his sense it would look forced. The female changeling had a hold on him, but if even just one sentence was enough for Odo to see past her, then this conversation with Kira would make no sense.
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John Smith
Wed, Sep 30, 2015, 10:18pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Empok Nor

This episode doesn't make a lot of sense. 2 killers out there vs a group of not well trained officers. Instead of making the Cardassians their top priority, Miles split them up and made them do other minor tasks so that they got picked off. Was Miles really a soldier?
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W Smith
Sun, Aug 30, 2015, 1:45pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S4: These Are the Voyages...

I agree with Jammer's review and two stars. I felt the episode was well-intentioned but with some obvious missteps and off-notes. I loved the recreated TNG sets (my favorite Trek by far), and the last 30 seconds brought a tear to my eye.
But Trip's death was utterly ridiculous. It felt so off and rushed, like let's just tape this and get it done. How the aliens got on board? Where was security? It was absurd. Too much Riker playing chef. No character development for the Ent principals in 6 years. It could have been much better with a few more rewrites and plot tightening.
I also think it would have been better received as a regular season episode with Riker and Troi commenting on history through the holodeck (minus Trip's death). That would have been a real love letter to the fans, and allowed Ent to have a more rewarding finale.
In any case, 10 years later and still not Trek series... just a rather poor alternative universe film reboot. I hope the 50th anniversary next year persuades the suits at CBS to do a new Trek TV series that continues in the prime universe.
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W Smith
Tue, Aug 25, 2015, 2:48pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S4: In a Mirror, Darkly, Part II

So tired of the mirror universe, it's been played out to death and is just an excuse for scenery chewing and showing off female midriff.
The one cool thing was the Defiant bridge being lit up in the last episode. Otherwise, the story was plodding and pointless.
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W Smith
Sun, Aug 23, 2015, 1:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S4: Bound

Greg nailed it, nicely done and kudos to him. Still the episode itself could have been done with more nuance and with an overall better story. But if the point of the episode is how to approach a relationship and not get burned, then it's correct. Those of us who have lived longer and become wiser, now know the score. Be strong and don't be weak, and never let someone steamroll you or make you sacrifice your principles and values. That advice is good for men and women who want to enter a romantic relationship. But frankly, friends with benefits is best, and I think most young people today are realizing that as well.
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W Smith
Sat, Aug 22, 2015, 3:26pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S4: Fourth Season Recap

It's been 10 years since Enterprise went off the air and still no new Trek show on TV. At the time of Ent's cancellation, I figured a new Trek would crop up in five years or so, but I think the new JJ films sucked out CBS/Paramount's incentive to do a new series. It's a shame because I don't think Trek works narratively as films very well (action is not its forte), and is much better suited to TV's weekly episodes for thoughtful storytelling. Such a shame.

As for Enterprise, it was finally finding its legs in season 4 (better than season 3 IMO), and I would have liked to have seen a season 5. Another shame.
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W Smith
Sat, Aug 22, 2015, 2:50pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S4: Divergence

Maybe I missed it, but why was Archer the only one who came down to the planet? It's a hostile planet full of Klingons, wouldn't you at least take a few MACOs with you?
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W Smith
Fri, Aug 21, 2015, 2:05pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S4: The Aenar

A disappointing conclusion to the three-parter but not terrible either. The Aenar were interesting, and the Romulans had a clear motivation: chaos in the galaxy serves their plans for expansion. But the big plot hole was Gareb's motivation in going along with the Romualans' orders. If he really believes his entire species is dead, then what are the Romulans holding over his head? I figured either the Romulans threatened to kill all Aenar if he didn't cooperate, or he was being injected with some kind of "obedience" serum. Didn't make any sense that he would cooperate since he gave up his life as soon as his sister contacted him.

The best part was the Trip/Archer scene at the end. It rang very true, and something that anyone that has gone through a romantic breakup can relate to. It's not easy to get over unrequited love, and sometimes it's just best to get far away from that person in order to move on.
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W Smith
Thu, Jul 16, 2015, 3:26pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S3: Doctor's Orders

Overall not bad, especially since it dealt with Phlox who is well played by Billingsley. I saw the plot twist with T'pol well before the reveal, but my wife didn't see it coming at all. I think those of us with training or exposure to scriptwriting or story analysis caught it because we look for such things while watching a story. We know that a gun revealed in a camera shot means that gun is going to get fired at some point in the story. For others, it's a surprise. Seeing the "twist" in advance doesn't mean anyone is smarter or more prescient, it just means we all approach our story time in a different manner and outlook. That said, I didn't see the Sixth Sense plot twist coming, though seeing that movie probably helped me in this episode to detect the similar twist.
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W Smith
Thu, Jul 16, 2015, 3:21pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S3: Hatchery

Jammer hits the nail on the head again that Phlox must not watch much Star Trek to not see that Archer was going to get affected by the bug goop. It was so painfully obvious what was going to happen and what was happening, that the hour just becomes frustrating to watch. At least the episode could have concentrated on the peril of "only following orders" by the MACOs who have become nothing more than plot ciphers.
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