Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:

Total Found: 149 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 6
Set Bookmark
Sammy
Mon, Jan 16, 2017, 4:27am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Suspicions

I was 13 when I saw this episode. Loved seeing Beverly kick that alien dudes butt!

Worf definitely should have had more involvement in this episode.

Set Bookmark
Sam
Wed, Jan 11, 2017, 6:10am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

I know it's been a few years but to answer Captain Tripps point about the similarities between Galaxy's Child and Tin Man; Tin Man was a living space ship - bred (engineered) to carry a crew. Galaxy's child was a space whale.
Set Bookmark
SamL
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 5:44pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Timeless

The only thing I liked about this episode was seeing Janeway's frozen corpse. Serves her right - getting killed on account of the same propulsion technology she acquired from an alien race that was assimilated/destroyed by the Borg because of her selfish desire to get her crew home.
Set Bookmark
Samuel
Fri, Nov 11, 2016, 2:46am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Imaginary Friend

This one is at first boring and dives in to unwatchable territory by the end of the first act. This episode is not hated enough by TNG fans in my opinion. It's not "so bad it's good" it doesn't suffer from plotholes or even relian idiotic deus ex machinas. It took me two hours to stream this on Netflix. I just had to pause every five minutes to take break from the toxic mix of boring, bad acting, and ironically unimaginative plot. This is easily my most hated episode.
Set Bookmark
Baron Samedi
Thu, Nov 3, 2016, 9:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: Second Season Recap

@Samaritan I just saw this and appreciate that someone read my previous write-ups! I'm still working on Season 5, I think I got 5 episodes in before I got distracted. I promise I'll finish it eventually. Given that your last review was from a year ago, we're probably moving at similar paces.
Set Bookmark
SamSimon
Mon, Sep 26, 2016, 10:33am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Empok Nor

I like this episode a lot! Just rewatched it yesterday and it still works for me. Yes, there are clich├ęs, as Jammer wrote, but it's well directed and well acted.

Plus the terrible "Ferengi love songs" still burns my memory... so this is gold!!!
Set Bookmark
Baron Samedi
Thu, Sep 22, 2016, 1:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The Game

@pennywit I agree completely, this was always one of my favorite episodes. Only it and "The First Duty" come to mind as episodes where every element of a Wesley story "clicked" into place nearly perfectly. Wheaton and Ashley Judd had surprisingly good chemistry and the end chase scene is very fun - it shows Wesley being clever enough to pull off a few nifty tricks but also being captured at the end, which I makes it all believable and exciting.
Set Bookmark
SamSimon
Wed, Sep 14, 2016, 6:19am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Soldiers of the Empire

After Ferengi love songs, this episode felt like the perfect one!!! I liked it a lot, I guess I'm not yet bored by the Klingon episodes!
Set Bookmark
Baron Samedi
Sun, Aug 28, 2016, 11:46am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: I, Mudd

This was hilarious. Not "good" in a strict sense but so ridiculous that I'd recommend it. I feel like it went through a cycle where it was amusing when it came out, then became dated and "bad-bad", and now is "good-bad" due to the campiness and ludicrous dialogue. The acting throughout was hysterical by the whole cast - including the regulars and the guest actors. I love the earnestness of TOS, as well as each episode's attempt to tell a unique story. The fact that the episode is trying to be lighthearted and funny makes puts this in a separate class from something like "Spock's Brain", which I always felt like I was laughing at rather than with.
Set Bookmark
Sam
Thu, Aug 25, 2016, 10:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Darmok

Oh, apologies for the long post, but one last thing: we actually see the problem of teaching young children Tamarian directly in a scene from the episode, i.e., where the captain "tells the story" of Darmok and Jilhad to Picard. Of course, he doesn't actually "tell the story." He says about 10 phrases, and for each phrase, Picard intuits about five sentences just to explain what's going on. If you've ever talked to a child, you know how this process works -- except YOU need to do WHILE telling the story. You'll need to use some sort of denotative words or phrases with standard meanings to fill in the gaps for kids, just as Picard does for himself (because he's heard thousands of stories before and knows "how they usually work"). Kids don't know "how stories usually work" when they hear a story for the first time with a new situation or a new word or a new meaning. The only solution with kids is to explain the novel situation using "simpler" words or phrases that have clearer, denotative meaning. (Why can't the Tamarians do THIS when confronting other cultures?) Alternatively, you don't explain the new word directly and the kid learns its meaning from context -- in which case the kid now only understands "Darmok in X" to mean "I'm hungry" and nothing about Darmok himself. Learning words from context (how most of us pick up new vocabulary) will guarantee that the metaphorical meaning is completely lost. Thus, once those "stock phrases" begin to have a secondary meaning (rather than just a metaphorical one) for young kids, within a couple generations they'll start to lose the old metaphorical context.
Set Bookmark
Sam
Thu, Aug 25, 2016, 10:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Darmok

I know this is a very old thread, but I just have to say one thing in response to comments that try to show how this language can work practically by using metaphorical examples in English. I don't think anyone here is denying that metaphors can be used to construct meaning. The question is -- what's the next step? The Tamarians don't just use metaphors haphazardly, making them up as they go along (as in English we mostly do) -- they clearly have standard denotative meanings, allowing the same phrases to be reused in similar linguistic contexts to allow consistent communication.

We have a different linguistics term for what that is -- it's an idiom. And idioms frequently become "fossilized," in the sense that we continue using them for their denotative meaning, but we forget the meaning of the individual words. You "wend your way through," you "eke out a win," you use "sleight of hand," you "ride roughshod," you have "kith and kin," you "give short shrift," etc. I challenge anyone here to define the words wend, eke, sleight, roughshod, kith, and shrift, use them in other contexts correctly, and explain exactly how the function in these idioms (many of them metaphorically).

Of course, most people would have no clue, even if they know precisely what the idiomatic phrases mean. But that's only the beginning, since this process happens with words themselves. We forget etymologies, so if a word is used metaphorically at first, it often loses its original meaning. We successfully know what "gargantuan" is without having read Rabelais's novels, we know what "titanic" means even if we're rusty on Greek gods, and we know "colossal" denotative meaning without being aware of the statue at Rhodes. And those are just words all meaning "big" -- there are literally thousands of common English words derived from proper names for specific things that most people don't know the etymology of... yet understand the meaning.

And that's ultimately the problem with this episode. Even if you can figure out a way for the Tamarians to teach their kids this grand mythos without a proper denotative language to explain the meaning of the phrases in the stories, there's just no way that these metaphors survive for more than a few generations without becoming "fossilized" and people forgetting who "Darmok" was, while continuing to use his name in idioms with clear, recognized meaning. The vast majority of kids raised in this culture will just know to say "Darmok in X" when they mean "I'm hungry" and "Darmok on Y" when they mean "I'm sleepy," and eventually nobody cares who Darmok is, because that meaning is not only not necessary for communication, but it's impossible to describe completely to language learners without a denotative language to "fill in the gaps." Knowing who Darmok is would actually be an IMPEDIMENT to understanding, since you'd spend time thinking about this dude and why he's on the ocean rather than just instantly understanding the common phrase's meaning which was just uttered at you.

Oh, and by the way, if the universal translator fails at this language, then how exactly is it supposed to succeed at ANY language? How is it supposed to know what wend, eke, sleight, roughshod, kith, and shrift mean in those idioms? Does it really need to understand ancient Earth history to translate words like colossal and titanic? Obviously, no. Words like colossal now have denotative meanings that are now primary, not metaphorical. And words like wend and eke only make sense in modern English within phrases -- they have no atomic single-word meaning to modern English speakers. Most known Earth languages have plenty of similar situations, where etymology has become irrelevant to meaning -- in fact, you might say that's the DOMINANT case for most words in most languages. And once a word or phrase becomes isolated for specific uses, it's no longer a metaphor -- it now has a specific meaning. If the universal translator can't figure that clear denotative meaning out just because it's conveyed in a phrase rather than a single word, it should fail in every episode... because language isn't based on single words with atomic meaning. (If it did, we'd have had perfect machine translation between languages decades ago just by inputting a dictionary and a few simple grammar rules.) Meaning frequently resides in larger linguistic structures, but those structures aren't "metaphors" -- they're just stylized idiomatic phrases, where native speakers don't generally even know where they're from.
Set Bookmark
Baron Samedi
Sun, Aug 7, 2016, 2:02pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Space Seed

I've been rewatching a lot of TOS lately (instead of painful S5 Andromeda), I actually find this episode a lot better than I remembered. Khan is incredibly well-written to show how his effectiveness as a ruthless leader - I loved the quick cuts showing him picking up on Kirk's strategy of letting Spock ask him tough questions and looking for weakness during the dinner scene, as well as Khan's tactic of offering to spare Kirk (and then Spock) from suffocation for the loyalty of a bridge crew member. I get the complaints about Lt. McGivers, given the context of TOS often portraying female characters poorly, but in this particular story I actually found the seduction sequences very interesting. McGivers hadn't been exposed to the type of power exhibited by Khan in the tame, progressive Federation, and I don't think an individual case of a storyline like that needs to be inflated to a broad regressive statement about gender relations. Khan could tell that her claims of mere intellectual curiosity were a facade (a lie she was telling even herself) and dug under her skin, and she had no experience dealing with what Khan represented. Also, the final conversation where Spock discusses wanting to revisit the planet where they leave Khan and his crew is some bone-chilling foreshadowing unintended at the time. Spock's optimism that Khan's group wouldn't immediately die out (versus how we find out things actually went in TWOK and the bitterness against Kirk the planet's conditions fostered) is a great example of how the Federation has moved past the ideology of Khan to such an extent that they genuinely don't understand him or the danger he poses - which is why the Enterprise crew naively allowed Khan to access to the ship's database in the first place.

The fistfight at the end is still very silly - we see full images of the faces of the stunt doubles, causing me to laugh nearly as much as the lizard fight made me in "Arena" (another episode I liked more on repeat, for reasons that were less intended), but the episode is compelling enough that I honestly don't mind Kirk turning the tide with a flimsy piece of plastic.

This episode and The Wrath of Khan are good examples of how clunky execution (the fistfight in "Space Seed") and gaping plot holes (Khan recognizing Chekov in TWOK) really don't matter when the characters and story are compelling, whereas I find myself dwelling on those elements in "Into Darkness", which wasted a great cast on a horrible script and unimaginative directing.
Set Bookmark
Samuel
Tue, Jun 14, 2016, 1:05am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Most Toys

@Lore comments: Lore is dead. He is floating out in space and assumed by all to be dead.
Set Bookmark
Samuel
Fri, Jun 10, 2016, 12:08am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Civil Defense

Actually, not entirely wiping the computer makes good sense. They establish on the show repeatedly that the computers are a hodge-podge of federation, bajoran, and cardassian tech. Again, it's like saying why don't I wipe my office Mac and put Windows 10 on it. Different systems behave differently. Why not just replace all the doors with starship doors while they are at it? The point is that they and we are always at risk because of the constraints of technology. Totally believable in hindsight!
Set Bookmark
Samuel
Sun, Jun 5, 2016, 5:18am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Wars: Episode VII — The Force Awakens

Reviewers up talked even the prequels. Is there nothing so terrible that marketing and a little nostalgia won't retread as a Midas touch? The prequels were significantly better an this, more experimental and less hackneyed. Jammer, how could you prop up this mess and yet give PM 2 stars? Not to be trolling this page, but this is clearly an inferior feature, critics and popular press notwithstanding.
Set Bookmark
SamSimon
Sun, Apr 10, 2016, 9:38am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

This episode is pure perfection. Tears and shivers.
Set Bookmark
Baron Samedi
Fri, Apr 8, 2016, 8:57am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Bar Association

Wow Luke. That was impressive.
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Sat, Nov 28, 2015, 11:15pm (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: Second Season Recap

Season 5 Episode 3 "Decay of the Angel"

2 out of 5 stars.

"Dylan, Dylan, Dylan. What is the point of this? Are we pretending we're a crew again?" ~ Beka
"Oh, believe me. I won't make that mistake five times." ~ Dylan


This episode appears to be a hidden continuation of "Waking the Tyrant's Device" from last season. At some point in the future, Kroton's android rebellion appears to be going on and for some reason, the androids want Andromeda. Its not make clear why. Fortunately, it appears that in the future, they don't make androids like they use too, as the present day models are far superior.

In this episode we learn, for the few who haven't guess it already, that Doyle is an android. But she's not just any android, she is in fact the Rommy avatar. Harper wasn't able to get her personality just right (she was apparently obsessed with "finding Dylan") and so created a new personality for her and programmed her to think of herself as human.

Its a nice continuity nod to find out that Rommy is obsessed with getting back to Dylan, in the 1st season Andromeda was in love with her captain, but this was forgotten in later seasons. Here we see that she still in love with him and being reunited with him is what she wants most.

Doyle saves a man named Argent who quickly finds out that Doyle is an android, even though Doyle herself is unaware of this. He quickly attaches himself to her, despite Harper's obvious dismay and eventually manipulates things to both reveal to her that she isn't human and to get her to an asteroid with a Tesseract Generator.

This same generator is responsible for teleporting the Andromeda, Dylan, Rhade and Beka to an empty area of space. Here they are attacked and captured by armed men. Argent reveals that he is working with these men and that they in fact are all androids from the future. They have some plan for the Andromeda, although it is not reveal what, only that the Andromeda will play an important roll in their android revolution.

Fortunately Harper hacks the generator and destroys are beam out into space all the androids. Doyle takes many of them down, but despite the fact that these androids are supposedly from the future, they easily go down with one hit while Doyle takes several with apparently ill effect.

This episode gets only 2 out of 5 stars as the story doesn't make much sense and does nothing to move the season arc along. Doyle is a breath of fresh air and its uncanny how Rommy-like the actress can be at times. Rhade is more like his original character in this one, but still angry. Beka is Beka and Dylan is about average. Harper and Argent have some pretty funny dialogue with each other and some amusing scenes.
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Sat, Nov 28, 2015, 2:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: Second Season Recap

Season 5 Episode 3 "Phear Phactor Phenom"

1/2 out of 5 stars.

"He didn't insult me, not once. That's not right." ~ Rhade


Unfortunately this episode isn't really better then the last. Here we learn that there is apparently a "ban" on technology over the whole system. Who exactly in forces this ban is unclear as if also exactly what level of technology is okay and what isn't and who makes that decision.

Harper is alive but has been in the Seefra System for 3 years. Apparently the parts from Rommy avatar came with him but he hasn't been able to repair her. This hasn't stopped him from building over androids however.

He has also teamed up with the resident mad scientist who is trying to recreate (and failing) the Vedrans. At least there is someone here who thinks the Vedrans should be in Tarn Vedran. Why is she doing this? Well because the new Vedran will naturally be able to save everyone . . . because, you know, Vedrans.

Dylan and crew aren't happy with him, but they don't make it clear exactly what they're aren't happy with. Harper has also been stealing, but its not clear what or why he is stealing. But it won't matter anymore, because they "neutralize" the mad scientist and Harper is now back with Dylan.

The episode suffers from too little Rhade and too much Beka. Dylan here is just classic Dylan, but it is nice to see Harper is still his usal entertaining hyperactive self. Doyle is a character with a lot of potential and its obvious to everyone but the main characters that she is another android built by Harper.

At this point, I'm getting a little tired of being shown how messed up the Seefra System is. Let's move on to the mystery of WHY is this way and WAY it should be fixed and HOW they are going to go about doing that. And where are the VENDRANS?
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Sat, Nov 28, 2015, 12:33pm (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: Second Season Recap

Season 5 Episode 2 "The Weight" (part 2)

1 out of 5 stars.

"You know, this seems like a bad deal because, apparently, I die either way." ~ Dylan

Once again, this episode leaves more question then answers, not about the plot, but about the entire set up. We learn here that no one knowns about Slipstream in the Seefra System. In fact no has even heard the term "Slipstream" and faster-then-light travel is thought to be a myth. (This despite the fact that Seefra periodically get new arrivals and the that fact that if this really is Tarn Vedran - it would only be a mere 300 hundred years cut off from the rest of the galaxy, not nearly long enough to completely forget the existence of Slipstream on all nine planets.) We also learn that water is in short supply on all nine planets, not just Seefra-1.

Beka has been in the Seefra System for several months, aboard the Maru, she can't leave the system but keeps trying until she runs out of food, water and power. Why she doesn't land a planet before that point? She never bothers to explain. Just because, I guess.

She finds the Andromeda, intact (so much for the theory that Seefra-1 is the Andromeda), but without power and so sets of a distress signal. At some point she gets captured and tortured for about a month, including being threatened to be burned alive by a creature imaginatively called the "Core", a name which it sounds more like a machine then a creature. She then makes a deal with the leader of her captors, Jonah, and "fall in love" with him . . . apparently getting captured and tortured are the roads to a girl's heart.

At this point Dylan and Rhade show up to answer the distress call and we play the same old tired game, is Beka loyal to Dylan? Cause we haven't found out the answer that before, in like a dozen previous episodes. Jonah doesn't trust Beka not to be loyal to her old captain and devises perhaps the weirdest test in any science fiction episode. He presents Beka with two buttons. One unleashes the "Core" who will kill Dylan; the other fires a missile which will destroy the Andromeda.

The test doesn't work as Dylan as figured out, along with the audience, that the "Core" is actually Trance and that Jonah isn't really going to destroy the Andromeda - both buttons unleash the "Core". When the "Core" comes out, Dylan addresses her by name and Trance, naturally, doesn't hurt him, even though she looks like a miniature sun with little tentacles.

After Dylan reveals Jonah's trick to Beka, Jonah, apparently in a sudden fit of insanity, decides to shoot a missile at the Andromeda after all, purely out of spite with Dylan. This doesn't really sound like someone who managed to create the largest commercial cargo fleet in the system, but hey, who cares about consistent character representation? He and Beka split ways, with Beka telling him that she "really did love him" - because, you know, torture and stuff.

Beka frees Dylan and they are joined by Rhade, who has spent the entire time wandering the corridors. Yeah, former Admiral here people. They use Trance to power the ship and shoot down the missile, which also conveniently destroys Jonah's ship with splash damage from the warhead. The "Core" turns back into Trance's humanoid form, but she has no memories and only vaguely recognizes Dylan and none of the others. Rommy comes back online as well and informs everyone that it was Trance who saved them all by tesseract-ing them through the Route of Ages and into the Seefra System and that doing so cost her physical form and memories. Why and how Rommy knows all this is anybody's guess along with how she lost power.

The crew then mention that all they are missing is Harper and "Rommy" even though Rommy is right there because she is the slagging ship itself! But presumably they mean her Avatar (which as you recall was destroyed last season) and who the bad Andromeda writers keep acting like is a complete separate character from Rommy, even though we all know that the Ship and the Avatar are one and the same (that's the whole point of the Avatar in the first place).

This episode only rates 1 out of 5 (proper) stars. The new Rhade is still fun to watch and listen too and sounds less like Tyr this time around. Dylan anger at yet another person trying to claim his ship is well done, especially the scene where he see the company logo painted on the Andromeda's hull.

Unfortunately everything else is pretty lackluster. Beka has always been a rather boring character with really no function on the Andromeda, here she is running her "I'm a pointless character" in full tilt. While Dylan has is gathering the crew back together and getting his ship back and Rhade has connections, work, money and knowledge about the Seefra System; Beka on the other hand as been avoiding planets, getting captured, beat up, threatened and then "falling in love" with the man responsible for her troubles.

The whole plot is actually rather boing and doesn't really do anything to advance the story arc or make Beka interesting. The only good scenes are those with Dylan and Rhade together, as their dialogue is still pretty entertaining.
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Sat, Nov 28, 2015, 1:57am (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: Second Season Recap

Season 5 Episode 1 "The Weight"

2 out of 5 stars.

"There are three types of people. Those who can count, and those who can't." ~ Flavin

"'You can't get there from here' should be this place's motto." ~ Dylan

In Season 5, Andromeda returns to its space opera roots, setting up a season long story arc. However this arc appears to have little to do with the original storyline.

After the rather anti-climatic showdown with the Magog "World" Ship (actually several worlds with an artificial sun) Captain Dylan Hunt flies through the Route of Ages and somehow looses his slipfighter without explanation, manifesting in a dark corridor where he comes face-to-face with himself. Baron Samedi, above, describes this second Dylan Hunt as "godlike", but in actually this Dylan is exactly identical to the first Dylan, except he is wearing a jacket. (Why Baron Samedi thinks this Dylan is godlike, I don't know, maybe he is a closest Sorbo fan?) The two Dylans smile as if to say "of course I'd run into myself here" and then turn away from each other.

This scene is never explained, or commented on, for the rest of the episode. What was it about? What did it mean? Why did it happen? Who the slag knows? Is this Dylan's "paradine" self? Is this Dylan from another time zone (such as when he existed the Route of Ages in a later episode)? This is Dylan from another universe? Is the scene a visual joke on the old saying "If you travel long and far enough you will eventually meet yourself."? This question, and more, will not be answered.

Dylan finally escapes the corridor/Route of Ages only to suddenly ended up wearing the jacket the other Dylan was wearing. Have the Dylans swapped places? Is this in fact the other Dylan we are now following? Or is this writers'/director's error? We may never know.

Dylan is now on a planet (still no slipfighter) and is found by the Trance stand-in for this episode. Flavin. Flavin in fact is about this episode's only redeeming quality as he actually makes for an interesting and fun (if predictable) character.

We are then introduced to this planet's/system's rather farfetched premise. Its 12 planets, all identical, all of which everyone finds familiar, which is suppose to be Tarn Vedran or the Andromeda. Why everyone find this familiar when only Dylan has been to Tarn Vedran and the denizens of the planet are not the Andromeda's crew is not explained, like pretty much everything else in this episode.

We also meet Schwarzenegger's little brother, who apparently runs this planet. Its unclear if the entire planet's population consists of this one little town or not. But its a population of idiots. Also working for the Arnold's little bro is Rhade.

Rhade's character has received a makeover. While the new Rhade is a lot more fun then the old, one can't help but feel that this part was originally written for Tyr and has been adapted for Rhade's character. He also comes off as slightly unhinged and angry at Dylan for . . . well no good reason really, just because mostly. Where would this episode been without some conflict between the main characters. It seems the writers have totally forgotten that Rhade use to an Admiral, as he in no way acts like one would expect a former Admiral to behave.

After what seems like several bar fights, Dylan and Rhade are finally reconciled, Flavin does his Obi-Won thing and dies and the bad guys are driven off. No question are answered, including the pink elephant in the room which none of the characters even address. If this is Tarn Vedran, then where are the Vedrans?

This episode rates 2 stars mostly because of some fun characters. The new Rhade is a little weird, but its fun to see him less wooden and a little more Nietzschean. Flavin's character too is a lot of fun and Thomas' impersonation of a priest-like Schwarzenegger is fun to make fun of. A lot of things aren't explained, but then again, it is the first episode of a season-long story arc and it does a fair just of setting up the premise, as awkward as that premise is.
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Thu, Nov 19, 2015, 2:12pm (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: Belly of the Beast

Why would the Cetus be sentient? What would it do, exactly? It can't create art, can't compose music, can't build anything, can't write a story, can't grow food on a farm, can't talk to anyone because there is no one to talk too. It would just go insane being by itself for 6,000 plus years.

Which, by the way, what DOES the Cetus do for those 6,000 plus years? Are there other planets its eating? Is it having little baby Cetuses? Is it traveling here from another galaxy/dimension? Is it even the same Cetus every 6,000 plus years or is it a new one every time?
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Thu, Nov 19, 2015, 1:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: The Fair Unknown

Considering the various things actually wrong with this episode, you actually took time to complain that the Vedrans are "excessively blue"? Why? Do you think Trance use to be excessively purple? Or that the human character are excessively pink? With the actually stuff to complain about, commenting on this just seem excessively petty.

Like the writers often do, you too seem to forget that Rommie is a COMPUTER. So of course she is in favor of blindly following the admiral's orders, she's PROGRAMMED to do that and it was nice to the writers remember that for a change. Sadly, you didn't.
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Thu, Nov 19, 2015, 11:58am (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: The Things We Cannot Change

Interesting how everyone keeps blame Sorbo, when it was Trubune that actually turned Andromeda this way. Way to publicly wallow in ignorance people. All this bring to mind that ancient saying: "Better to be silent and thought the Fool, then open your mouth and remove all doubt."
Set Bookmark
Samaritan
Wed, Nov 18, 2015, 9:39pm (UTC -6)
Re: ANDR S2: Dance of the Mayflies

"The ungrateful dead."

That actually was hilarious!
Next ►Page 1 of 6
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2017 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.