Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:

Total Found: 14 (Showing 1-14)

Page 1 of 1
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Sun, Nov 20, 2011, 10:16pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Rapture

Elliot, I think it's at best an inference and at worst personal projection to suggest that the Federation and humanity are atheist and/or utterly without religion. The only legitimate source for that I can think of are some silly throwaway comments from Picard in early TNG, which was still being overseen personally by the atheist Roddenberry and which therefore smack far more of Roddenberry's personal wishful thinking than reality. The fact that Trek never chose to explore any non-Bajoran main characters' spiritual beliefs implies more that that show a) isn't about religion and b) didn't want to open a can of worms that could end up offending a bunch of people than it does to any sort of official interpretation that you have to be a card carrying atheist to join the utopia that is the Federation. Besides, if renouncing your culture and religion and becoming another bland drone was part and parcel of joining the Federation, I have a feeling Bajor would not even consider joining. And yet they are, so clearly the Federation is not as anti-religion as you want it to be.

I cannot for the life of me understand why so many atheists are so incapable of accepting that there will always be people who choose to have faith. If the Federation is even remotely the "tolerant" place we're told it is, it has a place for religion, or else Eddington really is right in "For the Cause" - they're worse than the Borg.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Fri, Aug 19, 2011, 10:30am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

I agree with the star rating for this episode and the general commentary, but I do disagree that it was made explicit that Kamala did what she did out of her own free will. The breakfast conversation between Picard and Crusher early in the episode makes clear that Beverly is appalled by the way Kamala is being treated, and her umbrage is what prompts Picard to look into it rather than just washing his hands of the fact that the Enterprise has become a de facto human trafficking vessel. (His apologia for arranged marriages in Earth history is pretty squicky, here, too). The episode regains its moral compass as Picard realizes that what Kamala is and is being forced (whether by gun or by overwhelming social pressure is rather beside the point when it comes to servitude this thorough), but I don't think it does anyone any good to pretend that Kamala and Picard are equals who have chosen of their own free will to deny themselves happiness for the "greater good," unless a woman subsuming her identity in order to become the embodiment of a man's desire is actually seen by the male writers and fans of TNG as "the greater good."
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Sat, Apr 9, 2011, 12:21pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Silicon Avatar

Every kid wants things that they shouldn't have. I wanted a pet lion and an airplane when I was a kid. Fortunately, my parents saw the wisdom in not getting me whatever I wanted. Abandoning your kid for no good reason is not good parenting, and it's something that shows up time and again on TNG. It drives me insane.

I would have found Marr's "revenge" a little more credible if she hadn't up and left her kid because she decided he was a hindrance to her career.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Sat, Apr 9, 2011, 12:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Ensign Ro

I find it interesting that so many fans reserve such invective for the female characters they dislike, far over and above whatever unkind words they have about male characters they dislike. I liked both Ro and Dr. Crusher as characters, but even if I didn't, really? Yes, Crusher can be poorly written, but there is not a single character on TNG that was not poorly written at least some of the time, due to the inconsistencies of the myriad screenwriters and the - lets face it - poor quality of the first couple of seasons.

I also think the fact that Nick doesn't know any "human females" who have an attitude says far more about his interactions with "human females" than it does about "human females" themselves.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Sat, Apr 9, 2011, 10:51am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Silicon Avatar

They didn't "shoot first and ask questions later." They were, to continue the metaphor, essentially letting the crystalline entity go on an unabated shooting rampage while wringing their hands about whether they had the "right" to stop it from massacring more people. It absolutely blows my mind that people don't think sentient beings have the right to self-defense. Yeah, this episode ranks as one of the worse examples of naive Star Trek why-can't-we-all-just-get-along "morality".

Also, why do so many parents feel compelled to abandon their children on TNG? I love how Dr. Marr just left her son alone "with some friends" on the colony so she could run around and be a scientist. She couldn't take him with her? I had a hard time feeling sorry for her loss since her kid was obviously pretty low on her totem pole of priorities to begin with...
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Fri, Apr 1, 2011, 4:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Silicon Avatar

The problem I had with Picard's "moral dilemma" was the idea that the concept of self-defense is somehow morally suspect. If shellfish could fight back against whales, wouldn't they? SHOULDN'T they? Why should any lifeform with the ability to fight back against its own imminent destruction decline to do so, or feel as though it should? Honestly, by season five, I was pretty well and tired of Picard's neverending "moral dilemmas" over issues that are self-evident on their face (such as the right to self defense, or the idea that being alive but "contaminated" is better than being dead and "pure" [See The Masterpiece Society]). TNG had mostly left such preaching behind by this point, making the occasional lapses that much more frustrating.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Wed, Aug 5, 2009, 2:40pm (UTC -5)
Re: Confessions of a Closet Trekkie

PS, Greetings from a fellow Illini - your descriptions of college days sure brought back some memories! (BA, History, Class of 2007)
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Wed, Aug 5, 2009, 2:39pm (UTC -5)
Re: Confessions of a Closet Trekkie

I used to be exactly like that: I'd only admit that I was into Star Trek/Star Wars/LOTR/(insert geek fandom here) if I was pressed repeatedly for detail and under duress. But somewhere along the line, I realized that the only people who judged me (usually with comments like "Star Trek is gay" or "That's retarded") aren't the kind of people I have any desire to spend any time around, anyway. So then a funny thing happened - I started being pretty up front about being a geek. I have three Trek shirts, which I wear fairly frequently (though I must say, they're well-tailored to fit me and sort of unconventional, so it's not the standard giant baggy XL convention T-shirt). I go to pretty much every sci-fi movie in the theaters. I spend a lot of time browsing in not only the Science Fiction section of Borders, but specifically the movie/TV tie-in section with all the ST and SW books.

Of course, there is a very significant difference: I'm a girl. And - sad to say - there are a lot fewer girlgeeks out there. I'm not interested in impressing other girls, and I'm not interested in impressing frat boys, so really, who do I have to hide my nerdiness from? Most guys I meet who are halfway smart/interesting/cool either share, at least partially, my interest in nerdy stuff, or at least think it's neat that I'm not just interested in reading Cosmo and watching Grey's Anatomy or Gossip Girl.

I can imagine that the stigma would be greater for nerdy guys trying to meet girls, but, AS a nerdy girl, let me say - we WANT to meet normal guys who love Star Trek. I've been hit on by my share of geeks, most of whom fall into the unfortunate stereotypical category you described earlier, but BOY would it be nice to meet a normal, well-adjusted guy who just so happened to know the name of the TNG episode where Picard went down to the planet with the guy who only spoke in metaphor. Because then I would reply, "yeah, but I rather preferred the DS9 episode where Sisko tried to lie to the Romulan senator and then assassinated him." And it would be awesome. And if they could actually name "Darmok" and "In the Pale Moonlight," I might just die of joy.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Fri, Jul 10, 2009, 2:07pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Singularity

I actually thought this was one of Trek's funnier episodes. The acting was spot-on and never over the top, and reminded me again why I like Dominic Keating so much. The nuttiness emerged gradually and subtly, so that when matters came to a head, it didn't feel forced. The scene in the mess when Hoshi is freaking out over her "family's honor" and Archer starts fighting with her, and then Reed's obnoxious klaxon goes off was just a great comedic moment, played with perfect timing. No, you can't take this episode seriously, but I don't think that's the point.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Thu, Jul 9, 2009, 3:25pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S4: Demon

The fact that I went to the University of Illinois makes this review that much more hilarious.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Tue, Jun 30, 2009, 1:30am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Marauders

I just saw this episode for the first time the other night, and wow, did you nail it. I was actually kind of excited for the climax when the Enterprise crew were teaching the colonists how to shoot and defend themselves - I (foolishly) was expecting a badass, shoot-em-up showdown in which the Klingons summarily got their asses handed to them. That's what would've happened in DS9, anyway. And even later-season TNG. Hell, even season 3 Enterprise.

But no, what I got was a ridiculous exercise in "showing up" the bullies without, miraculously, harming them. And the bullies - KLINGONS! - just shake their fists and leave? Without so much as a bloody nose? I call BS. Honestly, Star Trek was at its worst when it resorted to ham-handed moralistic preaching, of which this episode is an indirect, though apt, example.

Set Bookmark
Rachael
Fri, May 15, 2009, 12:45am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Stigma

Agreed with the other commenters that the allegory seemed to be much more about the original 80's attitude towards AIDS. I thought this was a decent episode, but I kept thinking to myself how courageous and edgy it would have been if it had aired in 1993 instead of 2003. As it is, our attitudes towards AIDS and homosexuality - though FAR from perfect - have come so far as to render the social commentary here a bit dull.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Tue, Apr 7, 2009, 6:21pm (UTC -5)
Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Wow, I wish I'd known about this site back when DS9 was on! Nevertheless, I'm glad I found it now, and it's been a real treat reading all your DS9 and TNG reviews.

Just one question: have you ever read any of the Star Trek "relaunch" books, and if so, would you consider reviewing them on your site? I've read most of the TNG and DS9 relaunch books, and since I highly doubt we'll ever see any more TV/films with those casts ever again, the books are really the only "canon" way to follow the stories of these characters, but they - like the episodes - vary greatly in quality (the Destiny trilogy by David Mack is my personal favorite). It'd be awesome to read a review written by someone who obviously knows and loves these characters, since they're probably the only original Trek that will be forthcoming, the new movie aside.
Set Bookmark
Rachael
Thu, Apr 2, 2009, 3:01pm (UTC -5)
Re: Trek's Musical Problems

I just discovered this website, and I LOVE it! I love all things Trek and am just now coming down from my BSG high, so reading your well-written and incisive reviews is both bringing back good memories and easing the pain.

I see someone has already invoked Bear McCreary here, but I was compelled to comment on this particular article precisely because McCreary's *insanely amazing* BSG score makes the Trek music unlistenable in comparison. I didn't really notice it the first time I watched DS9 when it aired 10 years ago, but upon re-watching the DVDs now, post-Battlestar, it's just cringe-worthy. Thank God DS9's usually incredible scripting and focus on character interaction make the banal music mostly irrelevant.

I'd really, really like to see someone take on a new installment of Star Trek in the post-BSG world. I think BSG changed science fiction for much the better, and I'd be thrilled to see a newer, darker, more intense Trek. Of course, in many ways, DS9 is the direct progenitor of nu-BSG, both in the creative talent (Moore, Weddle, Thompson) and in tone, style, and substance.
Page 1 of 1
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2017 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.